Best three easy improvements to my shop. How about yours?

Page 3 of 6  
just got done moving the air hose reel from the wall opposite my work bench, to overhead, near the bench. Why didn't I install one years ago??? Used 1/2" "L" copper pipe. Was a breeze to install except for getting to one of the mounting screws behind the reel. Attacked it with a quarter inch ratchet and ultra short phillips bit.
dave
Rich Stern wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmmmm, a couple of questions. What pressure are you running your air system at and does anyone know the pressure rating of "L" copper??
Bay Area Dave wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The pressure of the system is between 100 and 125. the L will take everything a 175 psi system will give! I used to have an auto shop where I installed an extensive air system with L copper. It is WAY overrated for that. Not to worry!
dave
Mark and Kim Smith wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BTW, the burst pressure of L is MORE than 2,600 PSI. I couldn't find the exact figure, but it's MORE than that. also, the 175 PSI figure I mentioned was for a 2 stage, 3 phase compressor I had for the auto shop...
dave
Mark and Kim Smith wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've been reading the threads on using plastic pipe of various material and problems with them either shrapneling or blowing. Shops I work in use the systems built back in the 50's, 60's and 70's consisting of galvanized pipe. Tried and true systems. So why not use the tried and true ways I tend to ask myself?? The ol' "Pay me now or pay me later" If you treat them right ( bleed moisture nightly, etc ) they'll last forever. Or, you can keep patching your plastic pipe over and over. Even if you saved money up front, you'll probably lose that in materials for repair and labor to do it. Don't know as I have no experience with plastic. Just the concerns I read from others.
As for "L" copper, sounds like it has the proper rating so it'll work just fine. Same way to assemble?? By soldering joints, etc? As for 2 stage, 3 phase etc, type of compressor, that doesn't mean anything. What counts the most is the setting of your relief valve or "popoff" valve in your system. Most are set at 150 psi. Most systems run at 120 psi or so. Most all "bought" compressors have the relief valve built in, no need to add it to the system. A nice thing to add would be an automatic spitter to bleed off moisture and scare folks that aren't used to hearing such a thing!
Along the automotive lines, if you need something flexible in a permanent air line, hydraulic one-wire hose would work. It'll get you around corners pretty easy and last forever. Too tough to use at the tool end though. It has a working pressure of 2500 ( for 3/8" if I remember correctly. Should increase for larger sizes. Largest size I have worked with was about 2" on a 35 ton rough terrain crane. ) With a burst much higher than that. We're talking Parker or Aeroquip stuff. And no need to press fittings as both manufacturers make reusable fittings.
Bay Area Dave wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark and Kim Smith wrote:

Many indusrial applications are being done with copper. One advantave oer pipe is ease of change. Want to add another branch? With pipe, you may have to break 10 joints from the new spot to the nearest union. With copper, you just cut and put in a "T" where needed. -- Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Humm, I have to go with 38 wheels and 125 drawers!
On 06 Feb 2004 04:38:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Rich Stern) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is initially going to sound crazy but here goes.
Grade school kids brooms "huge vacuum cleaner" (their term for "dust collector").
Now the words - kids, cleaning, dusting - and the phrase "tidying" up don't normally go together - when they're at home. But in a SHOP...
Maybe it's ALL THAT POWER - dust collector's muted roar, the sound of a large volume of air being sucked into a four inch hose, the way things magically disappear as the end of the hose approaches them or the sound of small pieces of all sorts of things rattling their way through the pipes on their way to who knows where.
All of my "stationary" tools are on wheels and normally reside against a wall. They get pulled out when used and push back when done - leaving wood residue behind them. Out of sight, out of mind. But, after a kid, or a team of kids have sucked everything that they can reach into that four inch hose, they start looking UNDER and BEHIND things.
In BIG VACUUM CLEANER mode, kids become prospectors searching for the Mother Load. Discovering all the sawdust that collects under a cabinet saw is a cause for squeeling rejoicing. That will prompt a search through my "sticks and dowel" storage tubes for an arm extender to get to the otherwise inaccessible sawdust. And like gold miners, they'll stick with "the gold vein" until it's all gone.
When they discover more "treasures" behind the tools on wheels they'll hound you until you move them out of the way so they can continue their prospecting.
After finding and taking care of everything the dust collector can handle, they find brooms and start sweeping small to medium cut offs into two or three piles - to be gone through for later "glue stuff together, use your imagination, sculpture/projects" The rejects go in a scrap box for kindling and "the good stuff" goes into each one's large zip lock stash bag.
When "the room full of heavy stuff that generates sawdust" has been picked clean they move on to the "quiet gluing and bug spitting room" (bug spit to them is shellac to the rest of us - but bug spit sounds cooler). Here they can't use the HUGE VACUUM CLEANER - they know curlies will clog it up (earlier learning experience) - so it's brooms and brushes. The interesting curlies get saved for a future creative project and the rest get stuffed in a "fireplace fire starter stuff" bag. All those little pieces that dovetails and tenons create are each examined carefully for some wonderful use, the rejects going in a kindling box.
As a bonus for me, they also find every nut, bolt, screw and anything else I'd dropped and couldn't find. Those go in the "stuff that was found and will be sorted out and put away later" can. One of these discoveries will prompt a "what's this and what's it for" question and one of my "too much information" lectures. I've learned to pay attention, so when their eyes start to glaze over I let them get back to The Hunt.
In less than an hour the cleaning tornado moves on, other games to play. I'm left with a nice clean shop (it's still cluttered but relatively clean) bags of kids project parts, a bag of fire lighting curlies and a box of kindling. I'm also exhausted and inspired.
Exhausted because I've had to mediate at least a dozen "he got to vacuum for 10 minutes and I only got to vacuum for a minute", "I found that first and she took it", "why can't I use the push broom this time?", "she says this is from a pin socket and I say it's from a tail socket" disputes.
Exhausted because I've had to watch them like a hawk to keep them from bumping their heads while crawling under power equiptment searching for treasure, trying to move a wheeled cart supporting a disk and spindle sander away from the wall to get to who knows what behind it ...
The inspiration comes from listening to all the wonderful ideas they have for a piece of scrap they found and saved.
Inspired because they got me to look for useful stuff in what would otherwise be "just scrap".
For those who'e had their teeth on edge, worrying about kids in the shop:
The sharp handtools are in wall hanging tool cabinets behind a SCMS station and are out of reach of kids and, with the doors closed - out site, out of mind.
All power tools are unplugged, and those that can be "locked down" are locked down BEFORE the human tornadoes get started.
I've got one of those powerful magnates on a stick things and use it when emptying the cyclone garbage can - finding the iron bearing parts that shouldn't have been vacuumed up in the first place.
To date there's been only one injury. While crawling around under the sliding table of my combination machine (a Robland X31 for the curious) looking for more sawdust to vacuum up, and despite my repeated "watch your head" warnings, one girl tried to get up while under the sliding table and dinged her eyebrow.
That prompted a "que tip and peroxide - neopsorene - big gauze eyepatch with four big pieces of tape to hold it in place - just for dramatic effect - medical emergency production with an audience enjoying every act of the three act drama, The star of this production, with her "eye make up" was in all her glory, basking in the attention of her fans - "Does it really hurt bad?" - "You gonna have to get stitches?" - "Think you'll lose your eye?"
Of course the tape and the gauze came off before she went home and her "gaping wound" lost some of it's shock value - a shiny neosporened eyebrow just isn't all that noteworthy.
Maybe, in addition to eye protection, ear muffs rubber gloves and safety glasses, I should add a helmet or two.
Nothing to buy, no slick jig or fixture, no new use for an existing tool- a single, free in terms of dollars, shop improvement. Clean shop and another one of those priceless experiences.
charlie b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Excellent reading. You're a hard act to follow.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Now thats a drive by gloat if I ever heard one!
great read!
Thanks _Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The number 1 best thing I ever did for my shop was to buy ($90) a 96 drawer card file catalog from a university. Unbelievably useful and handy. Can put bolts/screws in drawes per size;blades for hand plane/planer/jointer/hand jointer in drawers per tool, etc.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 13:37:44 -0600, Lawrence A. Ramsey

Those things really are handy. I check the local used office furniture warehouse on a regular basis for something similar. One day, I'll have one too!
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have one of those in my office/studio (I'm a music teacher when I'm not making sawdust). I store my cassette collection in it. Almost 2000 tapes. Geez.
Warren
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The thought of a "powerful magnate on a stick" just made my day. I can think of several magnates who certainly deserve such treatment.
Nice account of kid-friendliness in a shop!
Warren
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06 Feb 2004 04:38:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Rich Stern) wrote:

1) I tried for years to come up with an effective dust collection solution for my SCMS. I've tried using a box behind the saw, etcetera. Every solution either compromised the cuts the saw could make, or didn't do a great job collecting the dust. Well, I finally tried making a shroud out of that flexible plastic that's used for freezer curtains. A couple of hours of fiddling around, and Voila! It works! I now have a dust free miter station. It's a flexible shroud that attaches to the saw and moves with it, and it doesn't restrict any cut (extreme left miter+bevel, etc) that the saw is capable of making. Very low effort for a large environmental improvement, IMO.
2) Mounted my outfeed table top on 28" drawer slides. The table is 28" deep,so when it's pushed in, it doesn't get in my way. When I push it out, it extends out to 56" behind the saw (60" past the blade) which is just long enough to handle 8' stock, and I can move it in and out without even walking around to the back of the saw. After suffering for years with temp supports and and later a large fixed table that took too much room, I'm really happy with this solution.
3) Replaced shelves under my bench with simple shallow pullouts. This was so easy to do it isn't funny, and it improved the cleanliness of my shop a ton, because I can now get a lot more stuff neatly arranged on the pullouts than I ever could on the shelves.
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
brought forth from the murky depths:

Great! I've been trying to come up with something similar on wheels for Dina and you found it for me. Do you have part of the sliding section as a flat area with a stop to make it work? Slots in the immovable part for the larger sled? Thanks for the ideas!
------------- ----------- T===========| | slider ||stop S===========| | || ------------- -----------

In visualizing what you did, I decided that my smaller tailed tools would benefit by being placed on a shallow sliding drawer under the assembly table. I think I'll add one to the mechanics vise bench, too. Now to find an Accuride set that slides both ways for the pair on the assembly bench and devise a simple center detent to keep it in place when I roll the bench around. A spring-loaded inline skate wheel in a rounded V-groove ought to do the trick.
- The only reason I would take up exercising is || http://diversify.com so that I could hear heavy breathing again. || Programmed Websites
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 15:29:23 GMT, Larry Jaques

Larry, I used 2 54" pieces of 3/8" by 3" cold finish steel bar, bolted to the sides of the saw, parallel to the miter slots, with the edge dropped just slightly (.01") below the tablesaw surface.
You could do the same thing with wood, of course; 1x4 maple or 3/4" x 4" ply would be about right. These pieces are the sole support for the top, so the area under the top behind the saw is totally free for storage. The table top itself is 1.25" Fnnform with a .5" UHMW top screwed to it. Te drawer slides are just screwed to the edges of the Finnform. I made it a very tight fit on purpose, and I've never had the table move as work slides over it, not that it would really matter if it did, the support would be moving with the work, which would be fine.
I have a cab saw, and I've never seen any indication of tipping when the table is extended with material on it, but perhaps this wouldn't work as well with a contractor saw. Just to be sure, I bolted my saw down for safety. I certainly wouldn't let the total go much more than 27" behind the saw without a leg to support it. There is no reason really that you couldn't have a support leg on a caster if you wanted, though. In my case, I want that space, I have a tool cabinet under there.
The drawer slides are screwed to the insides of the bars, with the top of the slides flush with the top of the bar (remember,.01 down from the saw top). There are no stops, the table travel stops when the drawer slides reach the end of their travel. Remember, that far edge is 60" out from the back of the blade, long enough for 8' stock. If I need more (e.g, if I'm ripping a 12 footer) I have to use a temporary support.
One bar is bolted to the left side of the saw, the other is bolted to the right side of the right wing (I happen not to be using a left wing, because I have a sliding table).I bolted the left side bar to the saw thru the holes where the left wing would normally attach. On the right side, I drilled the right side of the wing in 3 places and bolted the bar to the outside of the right wing.
The following detail is confusing, and it doesn't really have much to do with the sliding table idea, but it does explain why I chose to support the sliding table with steel instead of wood. Remember, I had an extra wing. I used it behind the right wing. It is supported on the right by the right steel bar, giving me an 8" by 54" right hand side wing. This is why I chose steel for the support bar. Wood would be fine for the support bars if you weren't doing this.
If anybody's interested in this, I'll post a pic. I've kind got a lot of stuff going on here which complicates things, but the sliding outfeed is really pretty easy and simple.

2 way drawers under the right side of my saw, to store panels under construction.

Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
brought forth from the murky depths:

Dina's a 1920's model on wheels and is a bit busty (top heavy). I was planning on putting a caster on the bottom of the extension. The existing table is made from waxed 1/2" Baltic birch ply and would take a pair of glides on the bottom without any problem. Glued blocks would handle the transition from wood to metal.

I was thinking a rolling sled storage slot might be handy there. Thanks for the reply.
--
REMEMBER: First you pillage, then you burn.
---
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Jaques wrote:

Ah yes. In my case, above the outfeed table, to the right and against the wall. 13"ish deep, 42" high and 32" front to back. Maybe some dividers to keep the larger sleds from banging into each other.
Also, somewhere to park the saw fence when it's not needed/being used. I'm thinking under the right hand extension, 'tween the saw cabinet and cabinet under the saw extension.
And then, a place to park/store blades.
And then, somewhere for the push stick/feeder blocks.
And then, some place for the zero tolerance inserts.
And then... Sheesh! We ain't even stepped away from the saw table and I'm already at five.
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.