Best modern Router table Router?

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I don't know about everyone here, but I still don't see a real comprehensive analysis in the magazines with the features important to me as to which router out there is really the best for a router table. Here are the criteria I think are important. I know I have missed a few, so I would be interested in other's enhancements.
* Router should have a tabletop height adjuster built in. (Why pay the cost for a router lift today when so many have the feature. Some cost more than the router!!)
* Router should have a good range for all bit types. (The router should go down far enough for bits that just want to groove or need a lot of range for their application and up far enough that they don't need a bit extension.) I have a Dewalt DW625 that used to be touted as a good router table router. It has a real problem with range and the ability to go up high enough. I HAVE to have a bit extender which amplifies the vibration. I also had to install a Router Raizer.
* Here is something that I don't see mentioned: The ability to release the bit without turning 3 or 4 turns for the self release mechanism to work. (Mark Sommerfield uses a Hitachi M12V that I think has that feature)
* A bent wrench to remove the bit from top of the table. I made one for my MLCS extender. I don't know how you can work without one.
* An accurate dial built in that allows you to make differential adjustments from a given position.
* A hole for the height adjuster that does not fill in with sawdust without having to cap the hole. (There can be a gap below the table to allow the release of sawdust)
Has anyone used the new Milwaukee 3+ hp router with some of these features? How about the new Porter Cable (890 series?)
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You're looking for the perfect tool; it does not exist. Some data on application (including the 5625) at the http://www.patwarner.com/selecting_router.html link. ********************************************* snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

to
table.
the
cost
as
release
to
to
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I agree with your words of wisdom, Pat. I've wasted a lot of time looking for the perfect tool, perfect woman, perfect bicycle, perfect book, perfect whatever......
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Well, Pat, you seem to choose the Milwaukee 5625 for a router table, which I suspected might be the best solution at this time. My question to you would be what is your reluctance to choose the Hitachi M12V which which seemed to be a favorite of Mark Sommerfield. What is its plunge range like? What are the negatives of the 5625?
I have the 5615 body grip (a great router). Your discussion of the range of routers in your link above is really interesting. Have you ever put together a "Pat Warner specification for a router table router"? As you point out in your article, a router table router is essential and I bet many people (me included) put a router in one and never take it out. So why not design one that is for that purpose only.
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As you point out in your article, a router table router is

That would be called a shaper. A shaper would probably be cheaper than the cost of a router, router lift, and router table.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com Wrote:

When I checked out reviews of the Hitachi M12V on Amazon, there was on glaring problem noted by more than a few reviewers. The plunge mechanis likes to stick after a while in the table, necessitating removal disassembly, cleaning and reassembly. Another little prob was th "cheesy" depth limiting adjustment hardware. But at $160.00 o so.....HTH. To
-- tomeshew
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Tue, Feb 22, 2005, 5:35am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@patwarner.com says: You're looking for the perfect tool; it does not exist. <snip>
But, he did get about the perfect answer. We could use that response for a LOT of tool questions here
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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Right off the bat, this IMHO is not the best scenerio as it addresses this situation and the one that you mention later about the adjustment hole filling with saw dust.
The Triton has coarse and fine adjustments but you reach under the table to make them. Simple. Why have to keep up with an above table adjustment tool ot holes that fill with saw dust if you don't have to?

The Triton has never left me with a problem of not being able to adjust the bit any where I want. It can be used by hand as a fixed base or plunge base router with the same base.

With the Triton a 1/8 ~ 1/4 turn of the wrench and the bit is tight or totally loose.

The Triton comes with a bent wrench for removing the bit from the top of the table.

The Triton is adjusted with a large knob for coarse adjustments and a "screw driver tipped looking" dial/knob that points so to speak for fine adjustments. It can be easily turned, by feel and with out looking, in 1/4, 1/2, or full turn increments.

Addressed above.

I strongly considered the big Milwaukee when buying. I compared both side by side and chose the Triton. Had the Triton not worked out for me I would have returned it for the Milwaukee. I have 1 year from purchase to exercise this decision. So far, the Triton is staying after 8 months of use.
The Triton also has a rocker switch that has a guard that keeps it from automatically being turned on while a bit is raised/ lowered for removal. The switch lights up when poser is connected. The Triton comes standard with an edge guide fence for hand held use. The Triton Can be use as a fixed base or plunge router with no base changes. The Triton has a feature to easily remove the counter balance spring for under table use or replace for hand held use as a plunge router. The Triton has variable speed numbers on the dial that represent specific RPM's as indicated in the owners manual. The motor shaft automatically locks for bit changes when the collet is raised/lowered past the bottom of the base. The Triton is visually UGLY but does every thing well IMHO. My Triton replaced a similar sized Bosch router that I used in 3 separate router tables in the last 15 years.
2 in depth reviews of the Triton. Initially a couple of years there were bugs to be worked out as indicated by the first review. These bugs have been worked out and I have seen no problems personally with the newer models.
http://www.mv.com/users/besposito/woodworking/triton /
http://www.mv.com/users/besposito/woodworking/triton/update.html
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The Hitachi requires about a 1/4 turn or less to release the bit.
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Tue, Feb 22, 2005, 4:57am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com claims: <snip> features important to me as to which router out there is really the best for a router table. Here are the criteria I think are important. I know I have missed a few, so I would be interested in other's enhancements.<snip>
You said it, important to you.
For me, flat top on the router table, low enough to sit using it, router that works. Viola, perfect. For me.
Make your own router table, the way you want it, put the router want in it. Simple.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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You make violas on a router table?
Cool !
Gus
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The Triton does appear to have most of the features. I hate to say it, but you are right. It is ugly. I should not let that influence me, but they could sure use an escellent industrial designer. I will read your links. Thanks.
JT I did build my own router table. Used a combination of several people's ideas, some which you will recognize.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v384/eganders/0ce312c4.jpg
So, I did most of what you suggest. I just have not put the PROPER router that I want in it...yet. But you all are helping me to decide.
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Well keep in mind that you will keep it hidden under the table. LOL
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egand, I completely agree with you on this!
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I guess the perfect router could be built, the the lift overcomes many of the shortcomings of the routers that exist. They have that long stroke you want and the adjustments are extremely precisce and can be zeroed out from any position..

I have a Bosch router in a Benchdog lift. Don't see the need for a bent wrench, but maybe it is needed for other models. OTOH, I do need two wrenches when with design changes it can be made to lock another way and thus only use one.
A good lift sells for $239 to $359 or so. I wonder what it would add to the cost of a router to add all those features into a single unit. Of course it would have to be modular so the router motor could be easily replaced if it craps out after a few years so as not to have to toss the entire works. Then the mounting ate would have to be adjustable or replaceable to accommodate all the various cutout sizes that exist. The answer to that would be to have Microsoft make the router, thus setting the standard for everyone :)
The downside is the ability for the weekender to grow slowly. First came the router. Later came the table, much later came the lift. Doing it all at once would have been more difficult.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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The Woodpeck plungelift is about half that ($129). Add a Hitachi MV12 for $160 or so and you have a powerful, decent setup for less than the cost of some of the other lifts.
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On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 05:57:17 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote
I bought the 5625 (Milwaukee) just for a table (Thanks Pat!). Anyhoo, like all routers it seems there is a fair amount of backlash in the adjustment. Some of the fancy lifts solve this problem or give you a way to accurately track the height ($$$). I think that a router designed exclusively for use in a table is called a shaper 8^)
-Bruce
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Disappointing. I thought that the backlash would not be an issue with the Milwaukee because its weight would apply pressure to the lower part of the thread. What am I missing here?
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On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 22:26:36 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote

It's not as bad as it sounds, just that if you are creeping up on a height for raised panels or something where a 0.005" difference will ruin it, the standard proceedure when you overshoot is to back off and approach the height again versus just backing off.
(Whew! long sentence!)
-Bruce
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

...
The one other thing that's useful in a table router is to have a dust-proof on/off switch.
I use the Bosch 1617 and I've had to clean out the switch three times in the last year. It's annoying as heck. On the bright side it seems that many 1617 users have this problem, and the fixes are described here on the Wreck.
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