Best Miter Gauge?

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This started out in the thread about the Osborne EB3, but I'm in the market for one myself, having found the Incra 1000SE wanting. What I'm looking for is one that has a one piece bar with a flip-stop that'll go out to at least 36" or so, that works with a sacrificial fence to prevent tear-out, and is "very" accurate on miters (with a guide bar that adjusts for zero slop). The Kreg looks good, but it only goes out to 24". I'd really like some extra length. (heh)
JP
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Hi Jay I have the Incra 1000SE and you can remove the flip- stop and install in the other channel to give you the room for a 3/4" backer board and they make 36, 48, & 52" one piece fence's
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Here's one that extends to 46" ($239)
http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID 97
You can put a sacrificial board on the Kreg to get extra wood. However, the flip stop will no longer work. The original track by Duginski (before Kreg) had a flip stop that works over the sac wood. But it wasn't as solid. I'm not sure if you can get the old track any more. But here's something that is close, and you can extend it. http://www.woodhaven.com/DoItYourself.aspx
I'm almost sure you can connect it to the Kreg. Woodhaven sells a Miter Gauge that is very similar to the Kreg. http://www.woodhaven.com/detail.aspx?ID 41 They sell a deluxe kit as well, for $240.
I think I got my Kreg on sale for $100 less.
You could probably make a flip stop out of wood. Woodhaven has a flip stop that should work over a sac wood piece.
The Kreg allows precise tuning. (Vernier does 0.1 degree, and you can tweak it further). I also like the solid stops for common angles. But you are not forced to use these stops. The Woodhaven doesn't have the vernier.
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You can get a 4' track for the Kreg.
http://kregtool.com/products/ka/product.php?PRODUCT_IDI
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I got the Osborne EB3 and I like it very much. Check out their website http://www.osbornemfg.com/video.htm . Also check out the reviews from all the major WW magazines listed on the Osborne site.
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Glad you like it. I won't tell you what it's inherent problem is.
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You'd better tell me 'cause I ordered one yesterday! Luckily, they're out of stock until May 10th, so I can cancel the order. :)
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When properly set up to fit you miter slot, and the end of the fence farthest from the blade extended away from you in the 45 degree position, the telescoping shaft extended full length, grab the far end of the fence and notice that you can wiggle it 3 to 4 degrees +or -.
Accurate 45's in this position will be achieved by luck good luck.
While the gauge is stable with the far end of the fence closer to you with the telescoping shaft in its shortest position when set at 45 degrees, you increase the tendency of tear out as the cut is made.
For the best position to guard against tear out on the back side of "any" miter gauge the fence should be set so that the end of the fence farthest from the blade travels forward of the end closest to the blade.
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Thanks for the clarification, but aren't these problems inherent in most miter gauges?
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They sure are inherent in most gauges. If I have a board that is as long as Leon describes that I want to miter I use my chop saw. If there were real problems with the EB3 why would all the leading WW magazines rate it so high?
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For the same reason you do not see negative reviews of cars in Car & Driver magazine.
Mark
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Board length has nothing to do with it. The gauge set at 45 degrees with the telescoping arm extend to the far position has slop. Every Osbourn that I have seen has up to 1/2" slop at the end of the fence in the shortest position.

I understand that Fine Woodworking was not impressed for the reason mentioned.
Is yours the 1 in a million that does not have the play when set at 45 degrees?
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NO. Most miter gauges DO NOT have the telescoping third leg of a triangle as the Osborne does. The problem is that the inner shaft fits too loosely inside the outer shaft. When the inner shaft is extended to its outer most position or near 45 degrees the whole telescoping support flexes back and forth causing the fence to move back and forth.
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Thanks again, Leon. I'm gonna let the order stay. I don't think I'll ever need to extend it that far. Most of my projects are of the smaller variety.
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wrote in message

Ok, let me resay this as I think I may have misled you here. I am not talking about extending the length of the fence. I am talking about extending the telescoping angle adjustment bar to its longest position at 45 degrees.
This is a problem if you use this 45 degree settings regardless of the size project. When the miter gauge is setting on the saw, one end of the fence is close to the blade. The other end of the fence will deviate dramatically when the gauge is set to cut in the 45 degree position and the "angle adjustment bar", not the fence, is extended to its longest position.
If you extend the fence to accommodate a longer board, the situation only gets worse.
The 45 degree setting that has the problem with retaining the 45 degree setting is when the end of the fence opposite the blade end is the leading end such that the end closest to the blade trails the other end of the fence.
When you get the gauge, before going to too much trouble to make the miter bar fit correctly, set the gauge on your saw and set the gauge to 45 degrees with the fence far end in the shortest possible position and leading the blade end of the fence. Grab the fence and you will be able to wiggle it back and forth several degrees with little effort. The telescoping bar that sets the degree angle will be at it longer setting. To minimize tear out on the back end of the cut you want to be able to use both 45 degree settings on the gauge. Unfortunately only one of the 45 degree setting is stable.
With the gauge set at 45 degrees with the far in trailing, the 45 degree will be very sturdy.
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Gotcha. What would you consider a good, not great, miter gauge?
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Hummm... I pretty much use the Dubby miter sleds for most of my miter cuts where I am cutting several pieces to fixed or repeated lengths. I wanted however to have something simple and quick to square the ends of stock and I wanted something to be dead on with out having double check degree settings. I was looking for a miter gauge that was better than the stock issue that comes with the saw. I considered many different ones and chose the Osbourne EB3 as first choice. I liked the telescoping fence but found problems with the unit design. I took it back and bought the Kreg. It too had problems but Kreg was more interested in fixing the problem than Osbourne was. I have been using the Kreg for a couple of years now to mostly square stock.
The Osbourne EB3 works great at squaring stock but if you are going to spend $200, 2 years ago, you might as well get one that can cut accurate 45's also. I do use it in that capacity on occasion. Humm I wonder why Osbourne is offering the EB3 at almost half price right now? ;~)
The Dubby is great, The Kreg is pretty darn good. I believe that just about any of the after market gauges that use an indexing pin for frequently used angles are probably the least likely to have problems long term, the Kreg uses this method. There are a few new miter gauges that have come out in the last couple of years that use indexing pins and I would give them a strong look if I were in the market again.
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On Wed, 18 Apr 2007 22:39:36 GMT, "Leon"

I will add that the adjustment of the bar for the miter slot is problematic for me, I have a 1948 Unisaw the slots have some wear, trying to get the EB-3 to slide smoothly in the miter slot with out slop is a PITA. The Rockler miter gage I replaced the EB-3 with adjusts the whole bar along its length a more elegant solution than the EB-3 multiple wedging allen screws.
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 382
Mark http://home.mchsi.com/~xphome /
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I strongly considered the Rockler also. Great for building from scratch but with only being able to set the gauge in 1.5 degree increments I had to pass. While normally 1.5 degree increments fits the bill for new building, I also do furniture repair on occasion and have to tweak miters to really odd angles not found as a preset setting on any miter gauge. I needed a miter gauge that would lock in at any angle.
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RE: Subject
A question:
What do any of these after market miter gauges accomplish that a sled with a cleat tacked in place along the layout line of the angle in question doesn't do more accurately and a for a lot less money.
Just curious.
Lew
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