Best material to use for a deck

Page 1 of 2  

I don't know if this is the right newsgroup to ask this question of but people here have been so helpful and knowledgable I thought I would start here. If you have another suggestion, please let me know.
We have a grandchild on the way and an aging pressure treated lumber deck that would be hard on the knees of a crawling infant so this is the time to tackle this project. I am definitely not going with pressure treated lumber but am considering ipe (aka ironwood), mahogany, cedar, or one of the composites. I would prefer to let the wood age to a grey rather than treating it every year or two if possible. What advice can you give me?
TIA.
Dick Snyder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
IPE... it ages very well and will last a VERY long time.
It is tough on cutting tools will require several blades and bits.
It costs more than SYP and may be hard to fine depending on your location.
PT SYP is still the cheapest and most durable for the money.
I looked at composites and after comparing (1) board at $18.95 vs 5.95 for PT SYP, I had a change of heart. That is very significant when you start using 50-60 boards just for the top.
If you can find it, I would use KD pressure treated pine.
I also used a under the board mounting system(Deck Master) and that improved the looks 200%.
Cedar is waaay too soft for a deck board.
Mahogany will take your breath when you find out the cost.
IPE is your cheapest "exotic" and it would appear that it runs "about" $2.30 - 2.60 per LF which is $26 for a 10' board.
http://www.ipedepot.com/picelist01.htm
It should not take you long to do the square foot math.
Dick Snyder wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Two years ago I bought mahogany and it was 30 a linear foot cheaper than ipe. $1.89 versus $2.19. I'm sure both are higher today.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Eastern cedar? The red/white good smelling fence post cedar?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I made fence pickets from it. It splits too easily and has lots of knots. Its also hard to get lengths and widths suitable to cover very much deck.
I've used Trex and treated. Wish it was all Trex!
Jim
wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, I was just wondering. I got a buddy that has a 300' old hog barn full of 5, 6, 7, and 8 quarter stuff, in lengths 10' to 20' or so. It'd be pretty I think, and I do need to replace my decking. Again, just curious.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My deck is cedar and looks like new. We wash it every spring with bleach, soap and water in equal volumes. Here in Maine, Eastern White Cedar is $1.00 per bf rough. Our decking is 2 inch and I would not trade it for any other material.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

everywhere and can't find one made out of it. The way I figure, if it holds up using it as fence posts, it would surely stand up to a seldom used deck. And I believe Maine has a little more harsh winters than Kentucky.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim,
Are you referring to Eastern White Cedar that comes from the northeast or aromatic red cedar (juniper) that grows like a weed here in Kentucky?
I was referring to juniper when I said it splits easily. Its used for cedar chests and closet linings. Keep bugs out and smells great.
Jim in Kentucky

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jim, Yes, that's the type I was referring to, the red cedar. I really didn't know it was juniper though. The same buddy of mine that has a hog barn full of it, is planking his house with it and it looks really good. He's had the majority of it finished for a couple years and the smell is gone, but it's still pretty. I've made some outdoor furniture with it, adirondack chairs, swing, regular garden chairs and the like, and also a cedar chest, and it's holding up real good. I never had a problem with it splitting though. As I said, I've just been tossing the idea around. He owes me, my deck does need redoing, so what better payment than wood. But, I'm not real fond of having to redo it again in a few years. That's why I was asking. BTW, the decking is going to be 2 by thickness, and the privacy walls would be 3/4.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I haven't but I will offer that IME PT fence posts (These are the old CCA variety) set directly in the ground will last through at least 3 sets of cedar pickets.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pat Barber wrote:

How dependable is this company? Their website is badly designed riddled with bad spelling, etc. Is this one guy running it from his garage?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jest because he kant spel good duznt mean he has bad stuf. Sumtime peeple put too much emfisis on educashun, knot reel jobs. Dont be a prejoodished snob.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CyBrShRk wrote:

I've ordered significant quantities from them twice, and was well satisfied both times. They are helpful on the phone, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ed_h wrote:

Agreed. The operation is run by Rob Pelc who used to post to this news group a few years ago. "IpeDepot" is part of "Advantage Trim & Lumber Co." located a few miles from my home. I buy most of my lumber from them.
See Advantage's tour page for an idea of the scope of their operation:
http://www.advantagelumber.com /
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dick Snyder wrote:

I did an ipe deck last year, and am in the middle of another one now. Both are replacements for cedar decs that didn't make the 20-year mark. Ipe is tougher and more time consuming to work than softer woods. It is heavy, hard, and requires carbide tools. On the other hand, it should outlast cedar--maybe by 2-to-1. It greys nicely in a couple of seasons, and since it is normally supplied clear (no knots), and comes in 20+ foot lengths, it gives a very nice uniform surface with few if any butt joints.
Special invisible (almost) fasteners are not cheap, and require additional step of slotting the edges (unless you buy the stock pre-slotted). This adds to the cost and time to install.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dick Snyder wrote:

Dick. The issue with PT lumber is overstated and mainly due to incorrect treatment before and after installation. If you buy good quality (kiln dried before and after treatment), PT lumber and seal it before use and on a regular basis afterwards, there is very little, if any, danger from the chemicals used to preserve it. The main danger with PT occurs when poor quality PT is used in the first place and when it is not sealed. Also, the appearance is much improved by the sealant and the annual maintenance regime allows you the opportunity to repair or remove any damage, splintering, etc. Furthermore, I suggest you use a low VOC sealant (such as Deck and Shake) some of which are safe enough to drink! FYI, I have no commercial interest in this issue but did a lot of research a couple of years back while involved in building a community playground.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ipe. It will grey and will last for 50 years untreated. Ipe is also sold as decking material in 5/4 thicknesses and rounded on the edges.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dick Snyder wrote:

IPE is great, but 2 things to be careful with this material.
1. Wear a dust mask. I had a nagging cough that wouldn't go away for a few weeks when I worked with this.
2. Wear Gloves. This wood is the worst when it comes to producing hard, needle like splinters. Make sure all surfaces that children would contact are sanded smooth.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.