Best HVLP "Conversion" Gun?

Okay, I've done a little homework, and I've narrowed my choices for a spray gun down to HVLP conversion guns. (I already have a CH 5 hp oiless compressor with a 26 gal tank; this should suffice for most conversion guns unless I *really* missed something in my reading.)
I would like to keep the price below $150US. I've been looking at the Wagner 0276124 here: http://store.yahoo.com/gleempaint/hvcongunnew.html . It received a good review here: http://www.sawsndust.com/r-wagnerhvlp.htm
I've heard/read the DeVilbiss units are good, too.
Anyone have any good or bad experiences with HVLP conversion guns they can share?
TIA for the replies,
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave:
I've been having pretty good results with the Porter Cable PSH-1:
I've been shooting Hydrocote's Water-based Super-Lac and their sealer.
It runs around $100 (down to $80 if you shop)
Richard

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Please tell me... What is the difference between an HVLP gun / system and the usual spray gun? How does an HVLP function on a shop compressor, special fittings, reducers needed??
wrote:

Email address omitted contra Spam.
John Hewitt, Malaga.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For all practical purposes the difference between an HVLP turbine or conversion system and a conventional gun off of a compressor is that the HVLP, due to the low pressure shooting the material out, is more efficient in it's use of sprayed materials. The low pressure produces a minimum of bounce back and over spray resulting in a transfer rate of 85% + as opposed to around 35% for a conventional gun. That also makes it a less messy proposition.
Nothing special is needed from the compressor for a conversion gun. The conversion takes place in the gun. However, it takes a lot of air at high pressure (a big, usually oil lubed, two stage, 3 HP + compressor) to run a conversion gun properly. Figure on 10 CFM + at 90 PSI for a rough figure. The requirements vary from gun maker to gun maker.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Thank you for that, justy what I wanted, but,
If it needs air at 90 psi, why's it called a Low Pressure gun? John Hewitt Malaga Spain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
it converts the high pressure to low pressure, high volume. that's why it's called a conversion gun, John. it takes a lot of CFM. most small and cheap compressors can't handle the CFM requirements for this to work properly. By the time you spend your hard earned cash for the needed compressor, you coudda bought a real HVLP setup.
dave
John Hewitt wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The 90 PSI is just for the conversion gun and not a turbine system. That figure is the compressor input to the gun. The output of the gun has to be (to meet regulatory agencies requirements for HVLP) 10 PSI or less.
I've got no idea how the gun changes (converts, hence conversion gun) the 90 PSI 10+ CFM to HVLP but, to meet the legal requirements of HVLP, it does. If pushed I would have to say that I suspect that that is the reason the gun needs such a large compressor putting out such a high volume at such a high pressure.
Note: those "legal requirements" are standards set by various national and state environmental agencies that spray systems need to meet for the purposes of rating their emission standards.
That help?
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.