Best Glue for Teak in Marine Application

I don't work in teak and have not done any marine woodworking in the past 15 years. We are building a new anchor pulpit out of 8/4 teak (done in a lamination of 1 and 2" strips with dowels). Do we have any marine woodworkers in the group to advise on the best glue (strength and work-ability)?
Thank you!
Dennis Slabaugh, Hobbyist Woodworker www.woodworkinghobby.com
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Use epoxy, and be sure to wipe the teak with acetone, just before glueing.
Cliff
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Teak wood contains oil. When stress joints are needed epoxy is not enough because oil contained in the teak wood will not allow for a strong bonding. Washing the wood with acetone will not remove all the oil from the teak. In your case I would use SS screws and towels construction with epoxy. As stated before, washing the teak with acetone prior to using epoxy is recommended. I do not know your design. If you are using strips of 8/4 side by side to make a board I would use a long enough SS bolt through or a threaded rod C'Bored on both side with teak plugs and epoxy. I get very good results making teak plugs with a taper cutter. If not you can buy standard teak plugs at your local marine store.
wrote:

Use epoxy, and be sure to wipe the teak with acetone, just before glueing.
Cliff
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. . . I would use SS screws and towels construction with epoxy.

You gotta know this is coming. What do the TOWELS do????? ROFLMAO.
Wayne
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Yes, after reading the post I realized that "towels" should have read "Dowels".
More so I should have said "Expansible wooden Dowel Pins"

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To all who took the time to reply to my post:
Thank you !!
I have not dismantled the old unit as I write, but I suspect that the "dowels" we see on the outside are in fact "plugs" hiding some type of mechanical fastening system. The advice of epoxy and stainless fastening hardware takes the prize! We do need water resistance and structural integrity for the heavy anchor. You all serve the group well. I will share some before and after photos over the next week or so when we get it completed. Thanks again!
Dennis
Dennis Slabaugh, Hobbyist Woodworker www.woodworkinghobby.com
wrote:

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wrote:

About 1995, I did a glue up with biscuits on 3/4" thk. solid teak hatch boards for the main hatch of my sailboat. Three angled boards with one side continuously exposed to weather. Used titebond II with no real confidence that I would get more than a few years out of the boards. Sold the boat in '97 and, since I live 300 miles away, lost contact. This past summer, the boat showed up at Bay Springs Marina about 25 miles from my house so I asked the current owner if I could come aboard to take a look at how my work had held up (I had done a complete refit including an Imron paint job in '95). Those same hatch boards were still in use and the glue was holding fine.
Titebond III might even be better, it wasn't around back then. Keep in mind though, I'm not sure that it was supposed to work.
An anecdotal sample of one.
Frank
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I have used both Titebond ll and lll. Like you I have made new main hatch doors for my previous sailboat. I learned that Titebond ll and lll are good above the water line. See http: //www.diybanter.com/showthread.php tu955&page=2 .
However, for building a new anchor pulpit out of 8/4 teak my choice would be epoxy reenforced with mechanical fastening devices. Because the bow pulpit is subjected to the sailboat weight, windage, wave actions compounded by the anchor, the length of the scope and other imponderable factors.
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You could be right, depends on the design. If it sits on or in a stainless steel structural grid with the chain roller attached to it and that takes all the stress, the wood becomes just for looks. If not, epoxy probably best bet.
Frank
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[snipped for brevity]

I hope you read the MSDS on that stuff....wait... you must have, you are still here...
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On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 15:19:36 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

Yep, cat/poly is bad stuff if you're not careful, I was fully and appropriately safety equipped and, of course, this job was done outside. I had already done a couple of trucks with it, so had some experience. It is very easy to use but the vapors are not certainly not fit for inhalation.
What I find amazing is that anyone could buy it back then and the body shop supply places didn't even give you MSDS sheets or even warn you about it.
Frank
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