best finish with polyurethane

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wrote

No, not really, natural hair brushes go limp when used with water based products, in my experience and as you suspect water does not wash out oil based finishes.
And concerning artificial brushes, different strokes for different fokes. I never use natural brissle brushes and I would be willing to compare finish results to what would be considered a good spray finish. Its all about knowing what you are doing. Contrairy to popular belief I get glass smooth with General Finishes oil based finishes and the recomended "foam brushes", a quality foam brush however, I use Wooster foam brushes.
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wrote

Read the tin: seems like you have not done much varnishing lately!
S

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wrote

I read the lable that you provided in your post below, it is a water based finish. The reason to not use steel wool is to prevent rust stains from the water based finish.
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On 16/08/2010 00:14, Leon wrote:

All this is complicated by the fact that some oil based finishes contain water i.e. the oil plus a small amount of solvent is emulsified in the water, supposedly providing the best of both worlds.
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stuart noble wrote:

Which?
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On 16/08/2010 12:55, dadiOH wrote:

Certainly oil based paints I've used you can wash off the brushes with hot water and detergent, but that instruction is the only indication that it contains water. Anything to get the VOC down I suppose.
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On 8/16/2010 9:09 AM, stuart noble wrote:

I was very surprised when I bought gloss paint for a garden bench - it looked and smelled like standard oil-based paint, but the instructions said to use water to wash the brushes. The coating lasted for 4 or 5 years, in an exposed location on the north coast of Scotland.
I don't remember the brand, but I bought it from B&Q.
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stuart noble wrote:

I've never heard of an any oil based paint where the brushes could be cleaned with hot water and detergent. Could you specify what product?
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In my youth I watched my father on many occasions washing brushes in thick washing powder 'solution'. In those days there were not many other household cleaning agents, and washing powder was used for many things, including washing dishes. I still use a sequence of: wipe brushes as dry as possible on sheets of newspaper; then hot water and detergent, and dry wipe on newspaper again; then a last clean up in brush cleaner or white spirit. That way you minimise the amount of dirty solvent you are left with having to dispose of.
S
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Typically you want to clean oil based products out of a brush with paint thinner and or mineral spirits. You can clean out that solvent with water and a cleaner that breaks down oil such as dish soap that cuts the grease on your dishes.
When I work with oil bases stains I clean my hands afterwards with paint thinner and then wash my hands with an automotive type hand cleaner, that removes the paint thinner.
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This is what I just said, except that you should wipe off the bulk of the paint on newspaper and keep the use of solvents to the minimum. You do not want to be using water last as this will take longer to dry, and speed the rusting of the metal bands and nails of many brushes.
Incidentally, whilst finally drying, roll the brushes up in strips of newspaper, held on with rubber bands. That keeps all the hairs together for next time.

There is always a temptation to do this, but you are damaging the protective surface of your skin and quite likely to become sensitised and be stuck with the dermatitis, discussed here recently.
S
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You might want to hold the use of solvents to a minimum but after painting all day long I don't want to spend 15 more minutes cleaning the brushes.
Additionally, I have never had a brush rust then again I buy the more expensive brushes ..and a few of my brushes are not of this millenium.

No need, at least with a good brush..

Possibly but I suspect that paint or varnish on my hands for a much longer period of time is worse. I normally have thinner on my hands for 10-15 seconds, that is all it takes. After painting 20-25 homes in the last 12 years and using this method of cleaning I have not had any problems. This has been my practice for 30 or so years with stains. I try now to wear synthetic gloves to speed clean up even more but you always get something on you.
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You are one of the lucky ones. I last worked in a lab maybe 30 years ago, and I still can't touch greases or solvents without coming out in a rash. I'm allergic to the gloves too...
We are here to advise others: not to say what we have got away with and invite others to do the same.
S
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Perhaps, but I don't know any one that has had a problem doing the same.... I was not the first and I learned it from others.

Advising is what I have done... But if you are prone to be sensitive to the product, common sence would tell you to use another method.
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The trouble being you only get one chance to find out and you may regret it for the rest of your life.
S
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On 16/08/2010 19:39, Nova wrote:

Not offhand. An exterior paint from B&Q IIRC.
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Nova wrote:

Just about any. What does soap do? It emulsifies oil.
BTW, cold water works too.
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Nova wrote:

-------------------------- Years ago would clean brushes used with oil based material with waterless had soap like Go-Jo, then finish with water.
Worked for me.
YMMV
Lew
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But that is an extremely slow process to start with. Better to use a quick solution, clean the brushes with oil based solvents and once the brushes are clean wash the solvent out with a grease cutting soap like dish soap. Or let the solvent evaporate naturally if you are not going to use the brush for a period of time.
I'd much prefer to paint with oil based as clean up is much faster using oil based solvents than with water based products and cleaning up with soap and water. I have lots and lots and lots of practice. ;~)
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Wreck only

Some of the new water-soluble oil paints are allowing that nowadays, Yack.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_miscible_oil_paint This is for artist oils, but I've seen it advertised for house paints, too, though not locally.
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