Best finish for T&G pine paneling?

We'll be installing Knotty Pine T&G paneling in our house soon, and I'm wondering what the best finish to put on the pine walls would be? We just want a clear finish, or something that gives a slight amber tone to the pine. I don't want to stain the pine or cover up it's natural appearance, and I don't want a finish that will make the pine look "splotchy". The finish should not be "sticky" or require regular maintenance.
Suggestions?
Thanks,
Anthony
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wrote:

shellac
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I finish pine all the time. Try mixing oil based poly with mineral spirits--50 -50 . Its easy to put on and wont "sag" on you becouse it tends to soak into the wood. Water based poly will be clearer--oil based will leave a slightly yellow tinge.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Byron) wrote in message

Excellent
Shellac is supposed to be the ideal sealant for pine, preventing sap from oozing out of the knots and sap pockets making bumps in the finish. If you use an orange shellac, sometimes called amber, it will have a nice warm hue right away. If you use a clear shellac, you'll see the pine darken and warm up with age.
You can apply almost any finish over shellac, including lacquer, oil-based varnish, and water-based finishes. You can apply water-based finishes like a wiping varnish, use a cloth pad, wipe it on accross the grain and then rub it with the grain to smooth it out. Sand lightly between coats and you may want to rub the top coat with 0000 synthetic steel wool. A varnish over shellac will protect the shellac from water damage. The water-based finishes dry so fast they do not cloud the shellac underneath.
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FF

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Orange shellac will give a slight amber tone. Even though you don't want to stain, honey pine stain gives a very warm look. But you may need to condition the pine, or it will become blotchy due to the way pine accepts stain. Mark
HerHusband wrote:

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HerHusband wrote:

Time will give a nice rich tone. I'd use shellac. You can get amber shelac if you'd prefer.
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Ed
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