Best cordless drill?

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On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 05:02:43 -0500, the inscrutable Prometheus

I'd like PC a whole lot better if it came in a color other than Keeter Gray (Grey, Jeff.)
--== May The Angst Be With You! ==-- -Yoda, on a bad day -- http://diversify.com Ending Your Web Page Angst.
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writes:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)14600554/sr=1-25/ref=sr_1_25/103-6449867-4589445?v=glance&s=hi
I got a lot of milage out of the Ryobi I used to have (until the batteries went bad after a number of years). I know that Ryobi is not top shelf stuff, but it might do the job for you.
Around Christmas, some of the retailers around here (Menards) sell a Hitachi outfit for under 100.
del
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About 10 years ago or so, I was given a Makita 9.6V -- It has always been my favorite tool! (and I have a lot of them)
It came with two batteries. I keep one in the charger and the other in the drill. Even now, the batteries last a pretty long time. The drill has plenty of power for being a 9.6V, but the thing that makes me like it so much is the great control of the variable speed, very good clutch, and amazingly comfortable grip. Some of the other cordless drills I've used seem to blast away as soon as you slightly press the trigger. The Makita gives me very gradual power, so I can use it on small projects without ripping through them. Yet it has enough power to drive screws through just about anything, or even mix a bucket of paint. Keyless chuck is a must and the greatest thing!
So, anyway, if the latest Makita is anything like the 9.6V that I have, I'd stand behind it 100%. But honestly, I haven't worked with a new Makita -- I haven't had the need to. =-)
Buy something you really like -- it's an investment you'll have for a long time (unless you buy a crappy one).
I also recommend getting the magnetic hex extension shaft from DeWalt -- it's a great $5-$10 accessory for your drill that makes it a snap to change hex bits (screw drivers, pilot drill bits, etc.) and has an extending sleeve to hold screws in place as you drive them home.
X_HOBBES
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On 27 Apr 2005 03:25:39 GMT, Bruce Barnett

Here's a thought. Start collecting on those unsolicited emails. That oughta up the budget.
scrub
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I spent $180 or so a few years back for the Milwaukee 14.4V which is great. About a year ago, there was a Skil 14.4V on closeout at Lowes for $25, so I took a chance.
Doggone if that's not a nice little drill. It doesn't have near the torque or finesse of the Milwaukee, and the chuck is pretty rough, but it's a nice one to have around.
I find myself grabbing it first, for most light duty chores. So I'd say try a Skil - especially if you can find it for a steal of a deal price.
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On 26 Apr 2005 14:05:28 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

I'm still very happy with my DeWalt, and I've put that thing through hell on more than a few occasions- of course, since you've already got them, I'm sure you know that for yourself. The only brand I've heard praised more highly in most professional shops is Bosch, though you note below that none of those are cordless.

As far as I can tell, the biggest difference between the excellent ones and the cheaper versions is battery life. If you're not all that concerned about that, you could probably get away with any of them, really. Obviously, an little Black and Decker cordless screwdriver isn't going to work for you, but I can't imagine that there is really that much difference between the name brands. As I said above, I like DeWalt, but I also really like my Porter Cable router. Once you get to a certain point, it's almost more a matter of the color you like and how well they fit your hand than any real performance issue, IMO.
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I would concur most manufacturers are all variations and knock off's of the same. It's all the same technology. Being unique and creative and coming out with the most innovative product isn't always the best for longevity. The problem with cordless is that they can make rather insignificant changes glue on a different model ID and sell you the same product virtually every six months!
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In a review on cordless drills I read (cannot remember where), there was one other difference. The cheaper drills used plastic gears and the more expensive had metal gears. That's not a rebranding issue - that's a real quality difference.
Bob
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To be honest the BEST Cordless drill is the drill that "feels" good in you hand... and is balanced to be used for long periods of time without causing you to become a weight lifter
I have several cordless...and the one i reach for most of the time is a 14.4 Milwaukee....my 18 V Dewalt is just too heavy .. BUT it too has its uses...
The Milwaukee is getting old (at least 5-6 years) and the batteries are just fine... The DeWalt is only 3-4 years old and its battaries are also just fine...
Just my opinion
Bob G.
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I only have experience with DeWalt. Mine is now about two years old and I am extremely impressed with this tool! My drill is only 12V, but it's the XRP which I highly recommend (it's definitely more expensive). I bought an extra battery and charger (total three batteries) before starting the project of decking my attic. I was drilling some pilot holes and driving 3" sheetrock screws into the framing with no pilot holes. It was a four day project and I never needed the extra battery and charger because one battery would last long enough to charge the backup. The drill has plenty of power as well, and I like the variable speed trigger plus three ranges (geared).
I don't know about any other brands, but I have no reason to experiment. DeWalt has earned my brand loyalty.
For what it's worth, while my house was being built, almost every single contractor that I saw carried DeWalt tools. They're either great tools, or they are very good at marketing to the pros.
Tom
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I only have experience with DeWalt. Mine is now about two years old and I am extremely impressed with this tool! My drill is only 12V, but it's the XRP which I highly recommend (it's definitely more expensive). I bought an extra battery and charger (total three batteries) before starting the project of decking my attic. I was drilling some pilot holes and driving 3" sheetrock screws into the framing with no pilot holes. It was a four day project and I never needed the extra battery and charger because one battery would last long enough to charge the backup. The drill has plenty of power as well, and I like the variable speed trigger plus three ranges (geared).
I don't know about any other brands, but I have no reason to experiment. DeWalt has earned my brand loyalty.
For what it's worth, while my house was being built, almost every single contractor that I saw carried DeWalt tools. They're either great tools, or they are very good at marketing to the pros.
Tom
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I recently bought a Festool CDD cordless drill, even though I already own two other cordless drill. They are currently 100 US dollars off and come with excentric and around-the-corner chucks. Really handy when you have to drill or screw in tight places like inside cabinets. It feels very solid, and is extremly short, about half the length of my DeWalt.
<http://www.festoolusa.com/category.aspx?ID >
--
mare

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How's Rigid? Does it measure up?

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Mighty heavy.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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There's an up-side to heavy.
If you are driving a lot of screws, the heavier guns will be easier on the wrists, but a little harder on the biceps.
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On Wed, 27 Apr 2005 22:01:27 -0400, the inscrutable Robatoy

Try one of the Bosch Impactors (or other impact drill), Rob. The need to really hold that puppy into the screw head is gone and it will drive them with the weight of your arm and the drill. I set a 3" screw into a doug fir 4x4 at arms length/chest height. These are mazing little beasties. I'm SOLD on that technology for drilling as much as I was 35 years ago when I found pneumatic impact drivers for nuts and bolts.
IN fact, the next time I need to drive a bunch of screws into a project (a deck or sumpin'), I'm thinking of using my old 3/8" butterfly impact with a square-to-hex converter socket.
--
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Wow. A lot of replies!
When I was on market looking for cordless drill last year (again, last year in Feb), I went to WW show. Keep in mind that I like PC. I was looking for specifically 12V. When I looked at the PC newest model (just came out), I was very disappointed! The PC was so heavy that it almost would need two hands to use it! It was the first time it was all-metal gears.
So, I looked around. I liked the DeWalt "hammer" drill (yes, 12V!). Should have bought it!
Then I came out of WW show with a brand new Makita. For about $150, it came with two 12V batteries. The main reason I bought it was because it could stand well (without having to lay it down). I know it may be silly decision, but did it. Now, it has serve me well. It is well-balance, keyless, etc (and blue :D )
If I was to do it over again, I might would have bought the "hammer" cordless.
Chuck

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wrote:

Dick
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This is precisely where I think most of the differing opinions on hand-held tools come from... I like DeWalt because my 18v is heavy and fits my hand well- but... I haul around steel bars day after day. A guy who works in an office 9 to 5 (not saying that such a person is not a better woodworker than I, FWIW) may like a different brand or model simply because the handle is better shaped to fit their hand. And at the end of the day, not having blisters from an ill-fitting tool is worth a whole lot to me- like I said in an earlier post, they're all probably pretty good.

That's not a silly reason if the tool works well for you. Silly is buying the one that costs $5 because you just don't *want* to wait until you can afford a real one. I've been guilty of that more than once, and it has always bit me in the end.

Why?
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Well everyone else has responded so why not one more: FWIW I have owned two 9.6 Makitas, both still going although the first one I gave away to a friend. Have used a 14.4 Dewalt for the last 8 years or so as my primary drill. Wore out the two original batteries, use it as a backup now but still going strong. Santa decided I deserved a new Makita 14.4 impact driver and it came with a coupon for a new 14.4 drill. (Hence the semi-retirement of the Dewalt) With all that said, I really like my Makitas,especially the impact driver, but if I were going out to buy just one drill I'd probably get the Panasonic 15.6. I have never liked the 18volt drills, they're to heavy for what I want to do with them. The Panasonic (a coworker has one so I have used it many times) feels like a 14.4 as far as weight goes, It's very well balanced, and has plenty of power. (Warning: don't look at their impact driver drill unless you want to end up spending double your budget . You won't be able to live without it once you've tried one.) =0)
Lenny On 26 Apr 2005 14:05:28 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

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