Benchtop Jointer


I'm looking to get a benchtop jointer, and I'm looking at a 6-inch model at BORG that is made by "Porter Cable/Delta"
I plan to use this unit for light-duty work on thin woods that will be used for acoustic guitar tops and backs - walnut, spruce, maple, mahogany. In addition, it may be pressed into service to joint similar woods up to 2" thick for use as solid-guitar bodies.
Is this a good unit? Is there something better in the price range?
Thanks!
--Steve
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There was a discussion of this 3 weeks ago. I thought it was a piece of crap, but everyone loved it.
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I've searched all of the messages going back about 3 months--I can't find any mention of the jointer I asked about. Was it on a different newsgroup?
--Steve
toller wrote:

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http://groups-beta.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/browse_frm/thread/e1e5f334cf28c8d7/22fcddb3e9effcfc?q lta+benchtop+jointer&rnum=2&hl=en#22fcddb3e9effcfc
Sorry, 5 weeks ago.
<Steve> wrote in message

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toller wrote:

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/browse_frm/thread/e1e5f334cf28c8d7/22fcddb3e9effcfc?q lta+benchtop+jointer&rnum=2&hl=en#22fcddb3e9effcfc
Not exactly a piece of crap. I don't know that particular Delta model, but I wrote of the Craftsman, which I still think is a decent jointer for the bucks and size. I used it yesterday, in fact, and got good results.
I seem to recall you were hoping the Delta would do more than any benchtop machine will do. If you expect good things in a smaller range, then you will be satisfied. If you believe the ad hype, you're going to almost certainly be disappointed. Maximum lengths on any benchtop should be held to 3' or less MOST of the time. I've gotten good results with 4', and even did a couple 6' boards with rollers locked into Workmates as outboard supports (as an incidental point, this one kind of work that Workmates truly shine at).
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I have to agree with Charlie, I have the Craftsman 6" and works great up to 4' lengths. Its the only bench top I found that has a cast iron top and fence for $200 (Canadian). So far used on spruce and white oak and the results are perfect. Technique is probably more important than the jointer itself. Setup is still important to get excellent results.
This jointer is solid and no frills. No rabbets or depth of cut gauge, but not an issue for me. Most others can't cut rabbets either. You can make a depth gauge from a stick of wood a dial indicator and some small magnets for about $15.
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Steve wrote:

Personally, I think they are so small that they are a waste of money. I've seen 6" jointers on ebay in the 300-400 range. If money was an issue, I'd look there. Or heck, look at the ones from Grizzly. If space is an issue, surely a mobile base could be used to push it into the corner. (Something in the garage/basement could be tossed to gain room for a floor unit).
The short bed length on those bench top jointers would make them practically useless, IMO.
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I have the "Delta 6" Variable Speed Bench Jointer," model 37-070. The bed length totals only 30", end-to-end. Got it at Lowe's in September, 2000, for $267.00 (just looked at the receipt).
I use it with great success and am very pleased. In the not-too-distant past I've posted photos to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking of a variety of projects, most recently a "tall case clock" and a number of Adirondack chairs. Some of the parts are around 6 feet long. Straight! My "technique" begins with keeping pressure on both the infeed and outfeed sides OVER THE BED (not over the edge of the jointer).
If used with "skill/care," you can take the bow out of the edge of a board, working one end then the other, until you can make a single pass and get that edge straight. I've used it on shorter pieces to remove warp on the face, too.
And I store it out of the way, not taking up any space when it's not used.
Of course, your mileage may vary.
Jim Stuyck
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wrote:

Second that. I got the same (or similar) model last year for $199 :-).
It's not the tool I'd want to use to straighten a 8/4 bed rail, but big whoop. Not all of us are into building large-scale furniture.
As far as mobility is concerned, it's mounted on one end of a 24x48" cart, with a benchtop drillpress on the other end and a 12" Delta planer on the lower shelf.
Lee
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Lee DeRaud wrote:

I've got a Delta Shopmaster 6" benchtop jointer which superceded that model I'm looking to sell. The first $100 gets it and for another $30, I'll include a universal stand along with a Delta mobile base. Prefer direct pickup from Charlotte, NC rather than shipping....
I bought an 8" Bohemoth Jointer some months ago to replace it and don't need it anymore.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

snipped-for-privacy@carolina.rr.com.REMOVE
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A hand held power planer might be more versatile. It is smaller and less expensive than full size jointers. And with proper technique you can use it effectively on any size board--face or edge--just as you would use hand planes.
I would suggest hand planes, but that's neither a simple or inexpensive way to go when you consider how much a good plane goes for (not to mention sharpening equipment.) But if you're up for the expense and the learning curve this could definitely be the most satisfying way to go.
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A hand held power planer might be more versatile. It is smaller and less expensive than full size jointers. And with proper technique you can use it effectively on any size board--face or edge--just as you would use hand planes.
I would suggest hand planes, but that's neither a simple or inexpensive way to go when you consider how much a good plane goes for (not to mention sharpening equipment.) But if you're up for the expense and the learning curve this could definitely be the most satisfying way to go.
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A hand held power planer might be more versatile. It is smaller and less expensive than full size jointers. And with proper technique you can use it effectively on any size board--face or edge--just as you would use hand planes.
I would suggest hand planes, but that's neither a simple or inexpensive way to go when you consider how much a good plane goes for (not to mention sharpening equipment.) But if you're up for the expense and the learning curve this could definitely be the most satisfying way to go.
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I wanted to thank everyone for their comments on the Delta Benchtop jointer. It looks like it'll do perfectly for my needs, since almost everything I'll put thru it will be under 4 ft long anyway.
--Steve
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