Bench Vice Handle for new work bench

Here's a stupid newbie question -
I'm making a "traditional" European workbench. It has a "dog leg" type shoulder vice. I bought the vice screw from Lee Valley, along with the wooden handles.
The wooden handles came with two end caps, and two screws. The end caps fit loosely, so, duh, I figured that the screws are meant to hold them onto the handle (I AM learning something!!). After much thought and consideration, I decided that I didn't want to use glue on the caps, otherwise I won't ever be able to take them off.
So, when I attach the end caps with the screws, should I drill into the "top" of the end cap and into the end grain of the handle, or into the side of the end cap and handle?
Seems like a small problem - I've been doing a LOT of learning as I build this bench - some of it by trial and error, and some by reading and research. I'm so close to being done, I'd like it to go smoothly without another mistake.
Thanks in advance for your advice!
Nick B
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I put the screw through the end of the cap and into the end grain of the handle. It is still holding.
--
Alan Bierbaum

Web Site: http://www.calanb.com
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I just completed a bench using those same handles for my vises. Generally it is not a good idea to screw into end grain because it does not grip screws very well. However, the amount of stress placed on the screws in this application is fairly minimal. If you notice on the inside of the end cap, there is a little depression to indicate where to drill the hole to center it, so I am sure they intended them to be attached that way. For what it's worth, I screwed mine into a centered hole on the end of the handle.
-Mark
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I use (will use) threaded pipe, with removeable end caps! I also get more leverage with the longer length. It is easy to be more gentle with that leverage, it allows a finer touch.
Alex
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AArDvarK wrote:

Alex,
You must have better vises or jaws than I have because I find that it doesn't take much leverage on the wooden handles to strain the whole setup. Or I screwed up when putting everything together. I think we have to remember that these are not steel vises. Regards. -Guy
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Glue 'em on. If in the future, you can cut them off and make new ones. If had mine on for years. Screws in end grain, will crack and loosen eventually.
Dave

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Thanks guys, for all the answers!! I really appreciate it - it sure helps being able to tap into all the wisdom and experience that is here.
Nick B

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...

I'd glue them on, and cut them off in the unlikely even I ever needed to remove the handle.
I just finished a workbench with a tail vise that has a wooden handle. I used a 3/4" maple dowel and with two storebought maple balls about 1.5" in diameter ... I drilled into the side of the maple balls using a Forstner bit and glued the balls right on to the end of the dowel. I think the handle materials ran about $3 total.
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