Bench top power tool question?

If you own and use bench top power tools such as a table saw, planer or jointer would you say you were satisfied with the results? I have a small shop space and it is just too expensive to add on to my house or build a seperate building to house full size equipment. I have been pondering the purchase of small, more portable tools that I can use and then put away when not in use. I understand that I could not handle large projects with bench top tools, but then I often build only small items such as bedside tables, chairs, and so on anyway. What is your thoughts pro and con on bench top power tools?
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Everybody starts somewhere. Go with the space and resources you have for now. Someday your can get the bigger stuff.
your friend in Christ Gregory :)

jointer
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My tools are benchtop and have built armoirs 2.5'X3.5'X7' as well as kitchen cabinets. Learn the limitations and stay within those parameters. Other hand tools supplement benchtop.
On 11 Nov 2004 18:08:37 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (RESPITE95) wrote:

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RESPITE95 wrote:

Go for it! Make sawdust! ;-) I had a Delta bench saw for a couple years before I upgraded to a Grizzly contractor saw. I would still have the Delta if I still had the space.
-- Mark
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On 11 Nov 2004 18:08:37 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (RESPITE95) wrote:

Define 'satisfied'. Define 'results'. You can do good work with bench top tools, but you're going to be limited in size and what you can do. Things like bedside tables would be stretching the abilities of most tabletop tools.
Not necessarily a problem. But you have to be keenly aware of the limits. Since I do mostly small stuff, not a problem.
One thing I would strongly suggest: Mount your tabletop contractor's saw on a rollaway stand so you can take it out in the driveway or whatever when you need to cut larger stock. Once you've got things more or less cut to size it's a lot easier to handle them in a small shop.
--RC
That which does not kill us makes us stronger. --Friedrich Nietzsche Never get your philosophy from some guy who ended up in the looney bin. -- Wiz Zumwalt
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On 11 Nov 2004 18:08:37 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (RESPITE95) wrote:

you get what you spend for, and results can be improved some by bigger tools, but the determining factor, IMHO, is always going to be the users knowledge & skill. (that's why I'm here, I have very little of either)
My suggestion for benchtop tools would be to buy the most powerful of each model.. The biggest problem with benchtop tools is usually the table size, and this can be overcome with some fairly inexpensive tables, extensions, jigs, etc. that you build after you get your tools... However, if the tools are under powered, larger work surfaces and fences that you add may encourage you to try things that the tool doesn't have the power t do safely.. The bottom line is to enjoy making sawdust and retain all of your body parts (in their original places and working order)
I went the shopsmith route when I started, because it was all that I had room for, and an in-law had one that he wasn't using.. (until I borrowed it and cleaned and adjusted it, but that's a whole other thread *g*)
the nice thing about benchtop tools is that you can get them one at a time, as money and projects dictate.. a good benchtop table saw can be a whole new world to someone without power tools, and by adding extras as you go along, you can dado, grind, polish, slice and dice with the best of 'em..
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Thanks for all the advice guys! I need to make up my mind and get on with it. GCS
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I have/had a number of them. The delta bench top planers and drill presses are definitly worth having. They'll get you 90% of the way there.
The delta benchtop jointer is marginal. It has a good variable speed motor, but the tables often aren't flat and the tables are way too short. I sold mine. But if you get one, set it permanently to 1/32" and make extension infeed and outfeed tables.
The delta benchtop table saw is complete junk. Spend $350-$400 and get the base model grizzly contractor's saw. You can upgrade the wings from stamped steel to cast iron later. You can also upgrade the fence later.
The delta bench top band saw was junk also, although not as bad as the table saw. I sold this one also. I would spend the extra money and get the G0555 band saw from grizzly.
You could put all of these things on mobile bases and wheel them out of the way when they're not needed.
brian
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I have a Delta 12 1/2 in surface planer that I have used a lot. Built a rolling stand for it, so it can be pushed aside. It is a bit slow, and won't handle a wide hardwood board, but it is fine for most use.
Steve

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