Belt sander

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My Elu 3 X 21 belt sander bit the dust, (heh-heh) Recommendations for a replacement? My gratitude will be undying. (dust collection will be a significant feature)
Max
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I like my Ridgid R2720 quite a bit:
http://benchmark.20m.com/reviews/RidgidBeltSander/RidgidBeltSanderReview.html
Dust collection?
The built in ... is ... marginal, at best. I was guessing that's par for the course.
I usually rig it up to my Shop Vac to reach acceptable levels.
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wrote:

Interesting. I'll certainly give it a close look Thanks,
Max
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I got one of these about a year ago. http://www.toolbarn.com/makita-9920.html It replaced a POS 3x21 craftsman wich I dumped because it had no dust collection.
There is nothing about it that I did not like, There are a few things that I think are particularly Good:
* the integrated dust collection appears to get > 90%. That exceeded my expectations Oddly attaching a shop vac did not seem to improve on that much.
* Supposedly the quietest of the breed. It's certainly much quieter than my crapsman.
* I like the extra length of a 3x24. It's easier to *not* dig in and make a mess
*Subjective, but I find the balance and ergonomics to be quite good.
* Belt tracking is perfect.
* A long and plyable cord. I wish vendors would either put long cords or really short cords on a tool.
-Steve

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Totally agree on the 3 x 24 Makita. We work those HARD around here, narry a hiccup. We do replace the graphite pads quite often as these sanders are used every day. We also jury-rigged the attachment for dust collection. Works reasonably well.
Now what Leon mentions about using the Rotex 150 FEQ is totally valid. For flat work there is no need for a belt-sander in 99% of the cases and the dust collection is second to none. We do use belt sanders on edges.
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Pshaw!! 2 votes for the Makita. Where can I trade some 3 X 21 belts for the 3 X 24?
Max
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But....But.... I have *many* 3 X 21 belts. {:-(
Max
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StephenM wrote:

Overall, I'll concur w/ the Makita but it's a case of there's nothing any better rather than it being perfect...
- Will agree dust collection is good for a BS; I find the bag is in the way more often than I would care for (altho don't know there's any real way to avoid it in Makita's defense; certainly the PC way up in the air is far worse)
- Agree w/ the 3x24 form factor -- problem is that unless Makita has changed the actual production, the 3x24 is a 4x24 body w/ 3" platen/rollers so there's an extra inch of bulk that an ideal unit would not have; they would build a 3" unit from ground up (mine is several years old; while I don't think they have, it is possible they have fixed this since)
- The long cord is nice, but--there is something about the way this one is attached and that pliability that I find the d-d tail is _always_ underfoot; I can't count the times it's gotten chewed up so far. My old B&D w/ a stiffer cord never seemed to cause such grief...
- Balance/ergonomics compared to most of what else is out there is reasonable as noted; it still doesn't balance very well and the switch/lock is very cumbersome for my hands, anyway. The lock in particular is in such a deep recess and position that I have to poke it w/ the forefinger of the other hand most of the time to engage it.
_IF_ they were to build it in a 24" length, I'd be very tempted to try the 3-wheel B&D -- it's the closest thing now to my old favorite B&D of a forgotten model # that's been out of production for 20+ years now--I've worn out two/three and there are, unfortunately, no more new parts (gears) available and I suspect it would be prohibitively expensive to get them custom-made as the prime culprit is the drive gear that is machined into the end or the motor rotor. It had the feature of the motor being between the rollers and direct gear drive so it had low COG and no external drive housing as virtually everything these days does. That's what the 3-wheel design brings back, but I, like somebody else noted, won't give up the length of the 24" belt for the motor placement. Given its age, it lacked dust collection but that could have been remedied and used to be one was proud of making sawdust... :)
All in all, it (the Makita) ain't perfect but I don't think there's a better choice at the moment, unfortunately.
--
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dpb wrote: ...

Sorry, the first B&D above should be DeWalt--had the old B&D on mind and didn't catch the wrong initial reference...
If OP did have a very large supply of of 21" belts was reluctant to give up on, it surely might make this more attractive as the 3-wheel design gives a longer footprint for the belt length. How it actually compares, specifically, in that regard by measurement I don't know...
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scrawled the following:

I drape my cords over my shoulder, sometimes wrapping them around my arm, so they never get munched. It's embarassing to saw through your cord and blow a client's circuits, not to mention a real hassle in the interim, until you get the cord repaired and then replaced.

I hate easy trigger locks. They've sabotaged me more than once.
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"Larry Jaques" wrote

and came in different lengths, If you damaged one of them, you just unplugged it and plugged in another cord. Then repair the old one. And the could be used as extension cords too.
That was back in the day when black and decker actually made good tools.
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I was getting B&D back in the 60's, when the detachable cords came out I saw "that" as beginning of the decline... ;~(
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But back in the day, when I was young and poor, they did good work for me. I used to go to the factory service center and buy the reconditioned tools. Big bang for the buck. I still have one or two of those tools in my garage, almost 40 years later.
I used to build a lot of rustic furniture. I needed to drill lots of holes and sand those planks down. I was buying drills and sanders for $10 - $25. And they would last for a couple years or so.
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My first B&D drill and jigsaw, saber saw then, were Christmas presents when I was 11. I got rid of the jig saw but still have the drill for a dedicated set up. 8 years later I bought a B&D router, age 19, which I still have. About 4~5 years later I bought my last 2 B&D finish sanders and a belt sander. I don't know when I got rid of the finish sanders 20 or so years ago, but still have the belt sander which gets used about once every 10 years.
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On 4/15/2010 12:32 PM, Leon wrote:

I have a B&D router that I got some time in the '70s. Somewhere along the way I put it in a Porter-Cable plunge base. Would still be working if the armature hadn't grabbed my former ponytail (I now have a #3 buzz cut) through the air vents. I suspect that if I tear it down and pull the hair out it will still work fine, but I needed a working router to finish a job that day so went out and got a new Dewalt and haven't felt the urge to tear the old one down.
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On Thu, 15 Apr 2010 11:32:17 -0500, the infamous "Leon"

Ditto. An old B&D jigsaw and belt sandah sit on my shelf, ready for use. If you need a shop shelf, cut the board with an axe or B&D jigsaw, shorten to length with the sandah, and put 'em up.
And my old B&D 7614 is a 1/4", 1.5hp, rack&pinion/micrometer fed routah which I can adjust to within a RCH. I've always loved that old beastie.
But I keep the B&D 3/8 VSR drill (now with HF 1/2" keyed chuck) in the truck for the times I need to drill lags for ledgerboards, or when I run out of batteries.
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scrawled the following:

My old jig saw was all metal and no tilt shoe. The drill frame is metal with a plastic handle, single speed, 1/4", keyed chuck, and forward only.

Mine be earlier as it only has 3/4" hp and is all metal except for the plastic handles and bottom of the base. I was never very fond of the rack and pinion on my model as it used a wing nut to fix the adjustment but unfortunately tightening the wing nut would readjust the depth. It is my go to router for triming laminate. where the bottom bearing laminate bit is not so fussy about depth settings.
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On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 12:05:42 -0500, the infamous "Leon"

Both considerably older than mine. My jigsaur has a custome plastique body and I don't think the shoe is -designed- to tilt, anyway.

Mine has an eccentric lever for lock. It doesn't change the setting. http://fwd4.me/83z item 55

I think I'll try the little Griz H7791 trim-routah for laminate the next time I cut'n'trim some. A lighter routah is better for precision like that.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

That's ok for the saw and some things, generally a nuisance w/ belt sander, at least for my habits...
In general, I don't find them a problem, much...this particular one is particularly perverse for some reason--I think it has to do w/ it comes off at a downward angle too low to the surface and that it is so pliable it almost immediately is on the surface and is directly in line w/ the sander. Since it is _so_ pliable, when pulling the sander back towards one, it doesn't push the cord ahead but it grabs/sticks on the surface being sanded and before ya' know it, you've caught it. The point at which one has to hold it is so close to the sander that it makes free-flowing movement w/ the sander a pita.
I keep saying I'm going to rig up a spring holder or something but never do... :(

_I_ hate stuff I can't reach easily when I want to... :)
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Seriousely, http://www.festoolusa.com/products/rotex-sanders/ro-125-feq-rotex-sander-571536.html
It will keep up with a belt sander or do fine polishing.
I quit using a belt sander about 25 years ago.
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