Beginners Poly Application/Tack Cloth question

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VDS, good show!

I bought a Cleanstream from an eBay vendor who had it stored in a ghastly, stinking storeroom. It reeks every time I use it, but it filters well.
I decided that since I was going to protect my lungs, I'd go the extra dollar for the 100% filters. I reuse the hell out of 'em, anyway, so I get my money's worth. My lungs thank me.

Grok that.

Yes, usually, the filter protects the motor a bit, too. Flow is often through the hose, into the cannister, then out through the motor, cooling it as it goes. Follow the mfgr's suggestions, though. Some will eat (cheaper) filters if they get wet.
Well, I got my CNC router up and running today. After tracking down some grounding problems, I got it up. Motion in all three axes. I had to figure out how to reverse the A axis motor since it works slaved to the X. The gantry started to move both ways at once the first time. <g> Now I have to figure out how to configure the limit switches and home switches, and then I'm up and running! Finally. Next, I need to learn how to run Mach3, BobCAD, and BobART Pro.
-- Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise. -- Margaret Atwood
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On 7/31/2012 4:34 PM, Bill wrote:

You should have gotten the water unit. Its a bucket that the vac hooks to. Then it goes to a sanding pad. The drywall drops to the bucket (filled with water) and prevents the filter from clogging.
I have one and after listening to the wife really complain about the dust, went out and got the better unit with a really long hose.
So glad I did. I have loaned it out about a dozen times and everyone has the same reaction.... WOW!!!!
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tiredofspam wrote:

Using a vacuum bag inside the shop vac, the filter doesn't clog at all. The directions for the sander suggested, as an alternative to a vacuum bag, to put a few inches of water inside the shop vac. I found that DID result in a clogged filter. My reaction to the way mine works is still the same as yours: WOW!
My only further comment is the cost is higher than the price of the sander ($45), because I still had to buy a 1 1/4" hose ($15), adapter ($4), and bags (2 for $17). Yes, I keep track of my purchases on a spreadsheet! ;) You'd still be buying sanding screens whether doing with a vacuum sander or not. I think it's still a good value, I'm just providing information. In all fairness, this is the "bottom end" of such sanders, it is getting the job done, and I am impressed with the results--the connection of the hose to the sander not so much (but it's nothing I can't maintain with duct tape).
Reminding me of the "Best bang for 10 bucks" thread, the profit margin the sanding unit above must be darn impressive!
Bill

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On 8/1/2012 1:33 PM, Bill wrote:

Putting water in the vac is not the same as what I have. Glad that the bag works well. I am surprised.
Just for info:
The unit that I have is the http://www.sandkleen.com/products.htm MT800... excellent, one weakness is the sanding block. Don't drop it from 7.5 feet. It will break the handle off, but that is easily glued back with either C/A or epoxy with a little carbon fiber.
If you view the manual you can see how the hosing works inside the bucket. so the dust is placed in the water, not in the air like your vac .. The 20 foot hose was great.. glad I went for the longer hose.
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Leon wrote:

I sanded very lightly with 600 grit following the 2nd coat (and several days), and applied the 3rd coat. I noticed a blemish (1" by 1/4") created either by the blue nitrile gloves or by the sand paper. It is still visible following the 4th coat which I applied without sanding first.
My thinking is that I should give it 24 hours or more to set, and then go back to the blemish with the 600 grit (I have up to 2000 grit). Is this the right strategy, or is this likely to just make the blemish bigger?
Thanks, Bill
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On 8/3/2012 2:35 AM, Bill wrote:

Define blemish.
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Leon wrote:

I took 2 pictures to describe "blemish" and put them on my web page: http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
My guess is that they were caused by "sandpaper damage". I was pretty gentle though, using 600-grit with water. Hmmm..I was thinking that would be gentler than "dry", but now I'm not sure.
Can you suggest to me the best way to pretty-her back up?
Bill
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Bill wrote:

1. Sand the "blemish" and surrounding area so that it isn't sunken
2. Apply more finish
Note: this concludes today's rocket science lesson.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

I was definitely impressed with how a mere few seconds with 1200-grit removed the small "crater". More finish has been applied! : )
Bill
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wrote:

Possibly oversanded or merely wiped off with rubber glove.

Right, no big.

Precisely. Another wipe-on coat should have hidden it immediately. If not, he might have a contaminant in the finish IF it wasn't there before (and after) the -first- coat.
-- Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise. -- Margaret Atwood
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Larry Jaques wrote:

No, I tried two further coats (which didn't hide the small "crater"). Very minimal sanding with 1200-grit sanded the blemish perfectly smoothe.
I'm sure I will find the technique" very helpful again.
Jeff Jewitt's book, "Taunton's Complete Illustrated Guide to Finishing" is on my list of books to watch for.
Bill

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His _Hand Applied Finishes_ is my bible.
-- Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise. -- Margaret Atwood
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On 8/3/2012 3:35 AM, Bill wrote:

No.. 600 is for wet sanding a final finish.
2000 is way overkill.. used for the glossiest of finishes (especially when I was building model airplanes)... and great for tool edging.
If you have a blemish what kind?
if it is a fish eye or rough patch, sand with 220 or 320 to knock it down and put a new layer on after cleaning. If it is deep, you will need to use 180 to 220 to take it down a layer or 2.. then reapply your finish...
BTW you can reduce fish eyes with a fish eye killer. I got mine from an auto paint shop years ago. Now we have no auto paint supply shops where I live now. You can probably get some at a good paint store.
I think mine was Raja fish eye killer. I can't read the label anymore. 1 drop per pint - quart (already thinned) that's all thats required.. it'll last you a long time.
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tiredofspam wrote:

That would be silicon oil.
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Yes, probably.
-- Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise. -- Margaret Atwood
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I hear they tend to hibernate readily back east. (That's anywhere east of Idaho.)

Wait until it's dry and rub your hand over the finish. Feel any imperfections? Those are dust, nibs, paintbrush fibers, and raised wood fibers. A quick swipe with a piece of 400 grit sandpaper, a piece of brown paper bag, or a light pass with a cabinet scraper will take them down. Wipe off with a lint-free rag and recoat. I've been known to blow them off, too, but I don't go for super-glossy finishes and overlook tiny specks of very, very fine dust.

Yeah, 320 or finer. And I mean QUICK. Do not hover anywhere, just swipe it across all finished areas (-with- the grain, please) and dust off.
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
(comparing Paine to the current CONgress <deep sigh>)
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Okay, thank you for all of those suggestions. Will Do!
It's good that you mention them because I occasionally hover! : )
Bill
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'Occasionally' my ass, Mr. A.R. You'll probably wax individual fibers of wood, too. <titter>
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
(comparing Paine to the current CONgress <deep sigh>)
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On 7/30/2012 7:33 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Why do yo find it necessary to wipe down the nibs between coats?? Why don't you simply get them all after the final coat?
I neeeeeeeeeeeever treat between coats.
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wrote:

Again, I don't want to embed them in finish. It adds, what, mebbe 5-7 minutes (max) to a project?

True, but you slather stain and poly all over everything, too. Ewwwwwwwwwwww!
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
(comparing Paine to the current CONgress <deep sigh>)
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