Beginner : Nailing up T-111 siding

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Hello, What is the best way to nail up t-111 siding to a shed wall? I was going to first put some construction glue on the studs, then nail the siding in the grooves with ring shank nails (stainless if I can find them). I know this sounds like a very basic question, but it is my first time doing this. Thanks.
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It has been my finding that T-111 eventually needs to be replaced. I would nail or screw it only. It would be tough to replace if you glue it also. Also I would cut in to the studs and mount 1x4's diagonally from sole to top plate to add rigidity to the structure. IMHO this type siding is for appearance and not to add support to the structure.

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Why would properly T-111 need replacing? It's just plywood with groves cut in it.
Install the siding to maintain a decent distance from the ground (6" minimum). When you nail it, you can use ring shanked nail if you want (can't hurt) , but I simply used 2" common nails in a nail gun. 6" spacing around the perimeter, 12" in the field (middle of the sheet). Once installed, seal the joints with a good latex caulk (DAP Alex Plus) and paint, making SURE to paint inside the grooves to seal it. Spraying works best, followed with a brush while the sprayed paint is still wet.
T-111 is cheap siding, but if installed correctly, will give you outdoor siding with a "look", protection from the weather and structural rigidity as well. If it didn;t, it wouldn't be used on so many homes.
One think to think about is,.... if you think you're going to get tired of the look of the stuff, install it so that you can go over top of it later with a lapped siding or ????.
Good luck Rob
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"Leon" < snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net> wrote in message
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Yeah. But I have replaced a lot of the stuff on several homes due to home owners not keeping it properly painted and termites. This is particularily bad in humid climates and especially if shaded by bushes.
That said, many sheds often do not get much attention after being built.
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"Leon" wrote in message

cut
particularily
... besides being butt ugly.
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Say Swingman, I am probably going to get a job to build a table that will have a 3" thick by 42" square table top. Hard Maple, 3/4" strips glued up to make the width. Basically long grain butcher block style. Do you know of any one with a large drum sander to sand that monster?
Leon

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"Leon" wrote in message

Sorry Leon, I don't ... wish I did. If you do find someone let me know if you will.
Thanks.
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I'll do that.

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"Leon" wrote in message

If you're in the area, give me a holler and come by ... I'll be in the shop most every day this week. There may even be a walnut board or two you can walk off with. ;.)
You've got my e-mail, right?
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Yes it is, but you're cruel Swingman. The OP said he was a newbie and there you go telling him his dream finish is butt ugly.
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Well, let's be fair - at least he's not staining cherry or something.
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I've used it in a humid climate(central Texas) and regretted it even though I sealed it well and nailed the heck out of it. It waffled in between the nailed courses(studs 16 inches on center). I wound up going over it with horizontal factory primed hardboard and had no trouble with that as of 5 years later.
RonT
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On Monday, October 4, 2004 at 11:39:37 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

cut

e

ly

T1-11 is made in various forms by numerous companies. One type is made wit h a paper covered OSB. It needs to be thoroughly sealed or it won't last. Another type is made with paper covered hardboard. It will swell at every spot a nail pierces. The best one is described as "all wood". It needs n o finish and will last indefinitely. By the way, T1-11 is not trademarked product name. It's merely the name used to describe a type of grooved sidi ng. It can be made by anyone and still be called T1-11.
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On 8/17/2016 6:43 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That is a very interesting answer, well worth the 14 years we waited for it.
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<< T-111 is cheap siding >> I agree. I would like to to t&g cedar, but I am having a tough time finding it up here in RI.

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Have you checked into availability of Hardiplank, or the other cement board products? Reasonably attractive as long as it's kept painted (more than other pseudo-wood products), and impervious to bugs or rot. It's not impervious to kids with balls, but it's far tougher than masonite type products.
See http://www.jameshardie.com/homeowner.htm for details.
Kevin
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I can't imagine why either. Don't know why it is called T1-11 either since the stuff I have has 1.5 inch groves not 1 inch every 12 inches. If it had 1 inch grooves then the designation would make sense. The stuff has been on my shed for nearly 30 years, stained not painted. In a rainy climate I would much prefer paint. I used galvanized nails and nailed through the thickest part not in the groove.
Most houses rely on the sheathing (or at least plywood pannels in the corners) for part of the structural rigidity. I don't see why you wouldn't do the same with a shed and T1-11 will serve quite well. Corner bracing with 45 degree pieces may be common some places but not where I live. Slapping up a 4 x 8 plywood sheet is cheaper in labor costs and doesn't decrease the insulating area thickness.
Rob Stokes wrote:

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Yeah but when used that way, it is protected from the elements. A home with a plywood exterior does not hold up as well as those with non wood exteriors.
I don't see why you

There is not a problem with using T1-11 for the exterior as long as you realize that in a humid climate it will require more maintence than brick or fiber cement siding.

Slapping up a 4 x 8 plywood sheet is cheaper in labor

In Houston TX, one of the cheapest places to buy a new house, the 45 bracing is quite common. 20 to 30 years ago you could hardly buy a new home in Houston with out it having T1-11. Now all the builders are switching to Hardy plank and board. In Houston, you will seldom find a house built 15 or more years ago that has T1-11 that is still in good shape. For a few dollars more the builders are using Hardi plank and board and not having to worry about what the house is going to look like in a few years.
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Leon said:

That's good to know, as I'm hanging 4000 sq. ft. of Hardi-Plank as we speak- replacing that "fine" GP hardboard lap siding- cheap bastards!
Greg G.
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<Greg G.> wrote in message

to
You'll be glad you did. I've got one (New Orleans style) going up now that's spec'ed for Hardi-Plank siding ... I've also got it on my current home. Brick, stucco and Hardi-Plank are all you see anymore around here in Houston.
Hardi-Plank is hard to trim with, and, depending upon the sheathing, often hard to blind nail without waving a bit, but those are minor issues, easily overcome with experience. Hardi also makes a backer board that's much better for wet areas, behind showers, etc ... an excellent replacement for greenboard which, being a cellulose base, will often grow the dreaded (gasp) mmmooouullddd.
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