Beginner - making accurate 90 degree cuts by hand

Page 2 of 2  
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You might want to look into the Veritas Right-Angle Saw Guide[1]. I have one of these and the Veritas Dovetail Saw as well. Like you, I'm not very good at cutting straight with a hand saw, so this little tool works very well for me. I've also got the 1:8 dovetail guide[2] as well.

That's how I've done box joints, cut by hand. I do mine in a similar fashion to the way I do dovetails. I'll start by cutting all the pins/fingers on say the front and back sides of the box. Now that I've got the front and back sides cut, I'll use those to lay out my lines on the left and right sides of the box.
When you're marking things, it also helps to have some type of numbering/label system so that you can keep track of the front side of a piece, its orientation and which is the left and which is the right side. If you don't all ready have a system worked out, here's what I do:
For the front piece I number the left side 14 and the right side 12. The first digit 1 represents the first piece. The second digit represents which piece it connects to.
The right side gets labeled 21 on its left side and 23 on its right side.
The back side gets labeled 32 on its left side and 34 on its right side.
The left sides labeled 43 on its left side and 41 on its right side.
Thus you would use the pins/fingers of 12 to mark out the 21 side and the pins/fingers of 14 to mark out the 41 side. Then the pins/fingers of 32 are used to lay out 23. Then 34 is used to lay out 43.
For the orientation part, I just draw an arrow on the piece to represent which direction is "up". The sides that have marking on them are the outside of the box. I mark the outside because it will be easier to scrap/sand those markings off later after they've been glued up.
When you're doing your mark ups. It also helps to put an 'X' or other mark in the waste section. I forgot to do that on a couple of pieces, got distracted and wound up cutting into the wrong areas and ruining one of my box sides.
[1]: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pQ869&cat=1,42884 [2]: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pA718&cat=1,42884
--

If you want to reply via email, change the obvious words to numbers and
remove ".invalid".
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cutting both pieces together will be, ah, interesting, as the cut needs to be on one side of the line for one piece and the other side of the line for the other piece. Best to mark them out together, but cut them separately. If you make a balls, its then only one piece messed up, not both.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

basically
top
<snip>
Take a look at Fred Bingham's book, Practical Yacht Joinery.
Has sketches showing how it's done.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Aug 17, 7:09 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Heavy saw set if it wanders. Asymmetrical set if it always pulls to the same side.
What brand saw? How thick is the lumber you're cutting?

Stand back and shift left and right until the two lines on the adjoining surfaces look like a single line. Put the saw on the line and cut, eyeballing the saw and the line(s) together.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.