Be careful out there!

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I just thought I would post a reminder to my rec. friends to think about safety. As some of you know I teach HS woodshop (greatest job in the world!). Our school is one of a decreasing number of schools in SoCal that have an outstanding voc. ed. program. We have (had) two wood teachers. Yesterday afternoon the other teacher was working in the shop cutting some stock for the new term. He is a nice guy but is somewhat complacent in his personal concern for safety. I have mentioned it to him a few times, but his answer was always something like, "I know this isn't the best way, but I'm in a hurry. Besides, I know what I'm doing." Well, to make a long story short, he was ripping a short board (wider than long), guard removed and no pushstick. The board kicked back and his right hand continued forward into the blade. He lost about 3/4 to an inch of his middle finger (can't be reattached) and about two inches of his pointer. The did reattach it, but they are doubtful about if it will keep.
Here is a guy, experienced, but over confident who will have a long time to think about safety every time he looks at his hand. Please, guys, as I tell my kids, never rush. Be safe!
Glen
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Glen wrote:

the wrong place, but because your head was?"
rm
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Even when beginning to read these stories, you know something unfortunate is coming. When I finally get to what happens, it always makes my toes curl up inside my shoes and I grit my teeth. EVERY time I turn on my saws I think about these things and use a push stick and take my time. It doesn't take any longer to be safe rather than sorry. Too bad he had to sacrifice himself to learn that lesson. But it's a lesson not lost on me. Thomas

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This reminds me of a movie they showed in every shop class I had taken. IIRC it was called the ABS's of Hand Tools produced by GM. It featured a little cartoon caveman named Primitive Pete. The narrator would say something like "Don't do it that way Pete, you could smash your knuckles!" and sure enough the tool would slip and ol' Pete would be screaming.
My Junior High wood shop teacher would explain that if a blade was spinning at 1750 RPM and the blade had 80 teeth that would be 2333 teeth per second so if you only tapped your finger on the blade for one second and each sharp edge only shaved .001" inches of flesh or bone you would be all the way through a 1/2 inch finger in less than a 1/4 second. Then he would show the pictures of wounds and say this guy was fast, but not fast enough.
Junior High shop was 1973 and I still remember this. I can also attest to the fact that setting the blade only high enough has saved two of my fingertips.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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Setting the blade "just high enough" has also tossed untold numbers of boards back at the operator, especially when the stupid guard was in place to hide the wood/blade contact interface
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Sure boards can kick back, that is why you don't stand directly behind the blade. If I had not set the blade just high enough I would be missing the tip of my thumb and one finger tip instead of a band-aid and a scar.
--
Roger Shoaf

If knowledge is power, and power corrupts, what does this say about the
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I had a high school shop teacher who was a safety fanatic.
I thought he overdid it a bit. But all my fingers are still intact.
I thought that all high school teachers were safety fanatics. Apparently not.
He has no legitimate excuse for what happened to him. He is supposed to be teaching shop safety. And practising it as well.
Reminds me of the guy they sent around every year to the grade schools who lectured on never picking up blasting caps. He had almost no fingers. It made an impression on me. I can still see his mangled hands today.
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I had completely forgotten about that. Seems that, during the 60's, they even had a TV commercial about the dangers of blasting caps. Must have been a lot of them around, I guess.

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I had a drafting (For some reason it was called "mechanical drawing") class in Junior High. I'll always remember the teacher holding up his right hand, which was missing most of the index and ring fingers, and saying, "I used to be a wood shop teacher until this happened..."
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Hey Larry, I think we went to the same school. Old Court JHS? I don't want to name the teacher on line but if you contact me off group I'll tell you. Are you related to other Wassermans from Randallstown? Marc
snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

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Just curious, how was he able to teach drafting yet not be able to continue to teach woodshop? ... or was it that he no longer wanted to have anything to do with woodshop after the accident?
I ask because it seems that a significant amount of manual dexterity is required for good mechanical drawing work.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 21:03:34 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Try holding a pencil with it between your index and middle fingers and hold between your thumb and middle finger instead of the index. I'll bet you'll find it not very difficult to get used to. It gets a little bit harder with the ring finger instead of the middle, but again, you'd get used to it.
Interestingly, I've actually sometimes seen my penmanship improve by holding the wrtiting implement in a little bit of an odd way. It forces you to think more about what you're doing. I used to amuse myself sometimes during school doing that sort of thing. Now a cut on my index finger isn't an issue.
With drafting though you're pretty much always following some kind of aid to make a straight line/arc/whatever so I can't really see it being much of an issue.
Typing on the other hand (no pun intended), you're screwed.
-Leuf
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*snip*

There are one-hand keyboard layouts there, as well as typing with one hand on QWERTY. It'll take some to learn, but you can do it one handed.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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He never explained that, but I really don't know any reason he couldn't have continued to teach wood shop. He still had one hand intact. Maybe he wanted to quit teaching wood shop while he still had enough fingers left to switch to drafting!
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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That's the one! I know you! I lived accross the street from you. Your brother Larry is my age, in fact if I remember right, he is exactly one day older. (I remember because of the draft lottery)
Small world, huh? How are you doing?

--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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"Lee Michaels" wrote in message

I was working in the shop today with a guy who had NO fingers on his right hand. He is employed on the cornice crew working on a house I'm building, so there is little doubt where those fingers went. I was adding "laps" to cedar planks using a dado set on the table saw and, although I started out in a hurry, I kept seeing that hand with no fingers saying "here's what being in a hurry looks like".
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/29/06
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public service announcement about not touching blasting caps. Now his godson Barry Bonds has been involved in the steroid cheating scandal. My how times have changed.
--

__
Roger Shoaf

Important factors in selecting a mate:
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Lee Michaels wrote:

I have been at the local high school and watched a 8x24x6" deep drawer being thinned down to 4" deep on the 12" Powermatic tablesaw. The teacher was in front of the blade holding the drawer on end as he pushed it through. There was a student on the left side, reaching over to help stabilise the drawer and another on the back side of the saw doing the same. Six hands on the drawer, no safety glasses, no guards, no pushsticks. There was an 8" jointer with the guard removed (broken) and the metal fence for the bandsaw laying on the table ,across the cutterhead. The shaper had a 3"wing cutter mounted on the spindle, no guards and the table covered with paint cans. Kids wearing hooded sweatshirts with the pull strings dangling down using the 6" belt sander. Many more things just too numerous to detail. 100% incompetence, but the bumper sticker mentality prevails, "We don't care how you do it up North". Sam
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When the school board gets the workman's comp. claims, the program will be lucky to survive. The medical claims could be half a million easy.
He should have been fired when you noted the safety violations, schools can no longer afford such luxuries with the massive lawsuits the ambulance chasers will bring.
In the immediate budget should be a sawstop, period. Our poorest local school district is buying two for their highschool program.
It would be hard to fathom that a grant cannot be found for schools to purchase them.
Alan
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wrote:

Frankly, I would not want young kids learning on SS. I believe it would result in a complacency that follows them to an accident later on.
Instead, I would teach safety and procedure for use of the machine. When operated properly a TS is *not* a dangerous piece of equipment.
J
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