Basement Shop vs Dust in Home Above

I have an opportunity to create a woodshop in a basement -- but, upon being asked to do so, I was very hesitant to reply due to fear of creating a more dust in her home. Question: Is more dust upstairs a given with a basement shop? Or, can I effectively whip that problem? My tools are currently in storage and among them is a 1200 cu ft (advertised) DC. I used it in my last shop with the bags that came with it, and dust *was* a problem -- particularly with MDF. If I can figure a way to *effectively* whip this dust issue, I can have a great shop in the basement.
My apologies for the broken email address for replying. Please use deltaorion39NOSPAM@ sbcglobal.net (without the NOSPAM) should you choose to reply off-net. Thank you.
Gary
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Othello1939 wrote:

No.
Yes.
It sounds as though your collector is collecting but the bags are forcing it back into the atmosphere and the fine stuff is what you are having to deal with. Maybe you would be best off with a blower/filter (box fan with a furnace filter) to pick up the real fine stuff and separate it from the breathable stuff.

I don't have a dust collector hooked up and dust isn't a problem because I typically clean up a couple of times a day. Hey, you've got to do something while you're waiting on the glue to dry. I do use a shop vac with my whirly sander which makes a huge difference otherwise it's mainly good housekeeping.
UA100, a 1939 Unisaw...
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Do you know what kind of bags you have on your DC? You really want to get good bags as the ones that come with most collectors will let too much fine dust through them. Then you want to be sure you have it hooked up to all of your tools so you can collect as much dust as possible at the source. You could build (easy to do) or buy an air filtration unit that will catch some of the dust that floats around the shop. Seal up all the air gaps between walls, floors, etc so the remaining dust can't easily find it's way upstairs. Make sure you have a door that does a good job of sealing your shop from the rest of the house. Buy a good door mat to wipe your feet when leaving the shop. I don't think you'll have much of a dust problem.
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Larry C in Auburn, WA


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Also run negative presure in the shop. Do this by adding a vent fan through an outside wall. Then suck air from the shop and blow it outside. This way if there are any air leaks between the house an the shop the air will move from the hounse into the shop. No dust flow into the house from the shop.
So I see three parts. 1) Dust collector - it just catches the big pieces. Dust still passes through the bags and very fine dust will excape that way. You will also get larger dust particles because the DC won't get everything from the tools.
2) Add a Air filtration unit. This will catch the finer dust particles that float in the air. A broom will get the ones large enough to fall out of the air. By the way. A good place to look for high air filters is the used market for restraunt and bars. There are places that are outlawing smoking inside. Bars in these areas used to have air filters to clean the smoke out of the air. These should work great in the shop.
3) Add a negative presure unit. This will keep the dust out of the house.
One other thing. First seal EVERYTHING. If the basement is unfinished then it should be easy to get a spray like thick poly or paint and spray the underside of everything.
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Othello1939 wrote:

routers, a shaper, etc. etc., with lots of dust collection. Unless I stop and clean up every few minutes there's lots of dust.
Normally I cut several sheets of plywood, MDF, or particle board at a time, with 30+ cuts per sheet (yes, I make mostly small things). In other words, lots of cuts, lots of routing, lots of shaping, lots of dust.
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The only problem with dust I have had outside of my shop is from the sawdust that settles on my shoes. I put a door sweep on my shop door to help keep the dust out of the rest of the basement and it seems to work well. Make sure you don't have a cold air return in your shop so the dust won't get into your furnace. I don't have a dust collector but I do try to vacuum the shop when I'm through for the day. I second the suggestion someone had about getting an air filtration unit. I just got one and it really helps the air in my shop. Not so much dust settling everywhere. I'm sure that would solve any dust problems you might encounter.
Kevin

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If the home is heated with central forced air, usually this system also heats the basement so the air would be re-circulated throughout the house. This would be a VERY big concern as the furnace filters would not trap the fine dust! If there is a separate heating system and no air circulation between basement and the remainder of the living areas, it would be less of a concern.
Brian
| I have an opportunity to create a woodshop in a basement -- but, upon being | asked to do so, I was very hesitant to reply due to fear of creating a more | dust in her home. Question: Is more dust upstairs a given with a basement | shop? Or, can I effectively whip that problem? My tools are currently in | storage and among them is a 1200 cu ft (advertised) DC. I used it in my | last shop with the bags that came with it, and dust *was* a problem -- | particularly with MDF. If I can figure a way to *effectively* whip this | dust issue, I can have a great shop in the basement. | | My apologies for the broken email address for replying. Please use | deltaorion39NOSPAM@ sbcglobal.net (without the NOSPAM) should you choose to | reply off-net. Thank you. | | Gary | |
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My furnace is in my shop (in the basement) and I've found no difference in the amount of dust in my home. I do have a DC, but I didn't use to. I do change the furnace filter quite often, however, usually after each project I do.
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I have a basement shop located in the furnace room with central forced air and a gas water heater. There are no heat vents or air returns in the shop since the furnace and uninsulated duct work and being underground keep it a pretty constant 65-70C. I don't have any problem with dust escaping the shop into the rest of the house. This may be due to the negative pressure created by the gas furnace and water heater constantly venting air from the room. I use duct tape to cover the gaps in the furnace filter slot so that shop dust doesn't enter the return air system of the house.
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I just got a Delta AP100 Ambient air cleaner at Lowes for $200. It's a funny looking shape for a air cleaner, a triangle, But it works great. I have a small basement shop 15 x 12 and it really sucks up the floating dust. 450 cfms. I was looking at some other models when I came across this one. What I like about it is that it has a Light in the bottom, so it's like two birds with one stone. I 've currently reconfiguring my shop. Last night I was cutting a lot of MDF and Hardbord for a new Miter station, dust everywhere. So I flipped on the filter and away it went. I highly recomend it.

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I don't have a problem with dust upstairs. However, I keep a piece of scrap over the furnace filter slot. Also, I sweep & vacuum after nearly all visits to the shop when I make a mess.
Good luck & have fun. Joe kb8qlr
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Yes. If you have and use a DC that will greatly help. An air cleaner helps a lot too. Sawdust sometimes sticks to my clothes and I sometimes forget to clean it off before leaving the basement. A remote control on the DC really helps with using it often.
On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 01:42:54 GMT, "Othello1939"

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The best way to deal with no dust upstairs is to eliminate the dust in the basement with a GOOD cyclone dust collector. I'm not talking about a plastic gadget on top of a trash can. To get a good education on dust collection in general, take a look at Bill Pentz's web site at
http://cnets.net/~eclectic/woodworking/cyclone/Index.cfm
Bill has solved the dust problem with a very effective, high-air-volume, cyclone dust collector design that has proven very effective in many installations. Not only does the cyclone remove nearly all of even the fine dust that is so probelmmatic, but by adding a good filter system on the output that is certified down to 0.5 or 0.3 micron at well over 99% efficiency, you can nearly eliminate dust in the shop.
I am currently producing a kit version of Bill's cyclone design as well as a blower housing to match. Info is on Bill's site at
http://cnets.net/~eclectic/woodworking/cyclone/ClarkesKits.cfm
If you need more info, contact me privately.
Clarke
Othello1939 wrote:

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