Basement Shop, Narrow Stairs--Table Saw?

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Bulkhead doors. They have the Bilco brand of outside doors on them for access.

We live in a bland society. Many people never go to the basement let alone do any serious work down there. Years ago, the basement was a place to do woodwork, make wine, do canning, repair appliances and of course, laundry. Today, it is used to store old video game cartridges and soccer knee pads. We accept Wonder bread so don't think buyers will have any more discriminate taste in home design.
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wrote:

If I'm to ever complete a transaction with a builder, he/she is gonna have to make lots of changes to suit the fact that among other things, I think a basement is additional living space. And if not that, certainly it's usable for more than video cartridge storage and a place for the boogey man to live.
Why is it that the people that don't want a basement simply build on a slab (SE Wisconsin)?
BTW, that subdivision my sister and her husband moved into looks like a scene from "The Stepford Wives." All look alike drab colors, cedar siding, ect. What's the matter with a litte variation - Colonials, Cape Cods, Tudors, ect.?
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Code is the main reason why some things are done. Living spaces have an entirely different set of requirements than temporary use spaces. Alternate egress being chief among them.
It's cheaper to build on a slab, of course, but the need for 4' deep footings in frost country makes it worthwhile to go the other four and have a basement, though hybrid designs with ground-level access/egress are fairly common to save money and still get the space.
Don't use the basement for coal storage any more, of course. Our coal bin became dad's shop when we converted to gas.
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Absolutely. Good idea. I'll ask for two ways in and out. Fortunately only 1 has to get the big stuff in and out.

That reminds me - I used to see that outline of a really large furnace on my basement floor. Something that was there and gone before I ever bought the place. I imagine it could have been a coal furnace since my house was built in 1941. But then I wonder where they were leaving the coal. There is no separate room in my basement, it's all one big space.
BTW, the reason I no longer see that outline is 'cause I painted the floor.
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George Max wrote:

Beats me.
My wife and I life in the only house that isn't painted either completely white or white with a touch of some trim color on our block. The next block also has exactly one house that isn't predominantly white.
There seems to be a psychology at work here that I simply won't subscribe to.
baa-baa
Bill
--
There is hopeful symbolism in the fact that flags do not wave in a vacuum.

Arthur C. Clarke
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wrote:

I hear you. A little individuality is nice. We're not talking rusty old cars in the backyard, just something for personality.
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George Max wrote:

Maybe "she" didn't "look" over the "plans"?
Mike
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On 29 Nov 2006 06:37:46 -0800, upand_at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'm sure that's it. She and her husband were probably way too excited at having a new home built that this fact was overlooked.
In my case, such a thing is the first thing I'm looking at.
It's about priorities, isn't it? How best to get the jointer, TS and sheets of plywood down and up. And constructed projects out.
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wrote:

The Ridgid comes in lots and lots of pieces, I don't think you'd have any problem carrying it downstairs (there are a couple really heavy pieces, you'd better have help). When I helped a friend put his together, it went together easily and works wonderfully. Haven't tried putting together any other contractor's saws though but I would assume they're similar.
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A conventional contractors saw is probably the easiest to dissasembe & reassemble. Take off the motor, unbolt from stand. I had to partially disassemble mine to get it in the basement and I was able to stop at this point. My saw has steel extension tables & rails for 25" rip capacity so I was able to leave them attached. If it has cast iron table extensions, you'll probably want to remove them and the fence rails before taking it down the stairs, even if it will fit, because of weight & susceptability to damage. down the stairs
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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wrote:

First, for the best value on the dollar I would go to ....www.grizzly.com This stuff comes fairly well broken down. The cast table will be the most difficult but even that is not more than a two man job.
Good Luck, J
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I recently bought the Rigid 3650, and have the same narrow stairs problem. The thing is heavy - 300 pounds - but comes disassembled. The heaviest piece was about 100 pounds. I had no problem getting the thing into the basement by myself.
And, that tool is so accurate! Compared to my Crapsman radial arm saw it's night and day. Get some accurate measuring tools to set the thing up properly and you'll be able to get consistent cuts to a couple of a thousanths of an inch.
- Jack
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wrote:

These answers have been great--very helpful.
Does anyone have experience with the Dewalt DW746, as to how big its subassemblies are as delivered?
(remove "x" from address for email)
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wrote:

My Delta contractor's saw (36-680) came in three seperate boxes- and I brought it home in the trunk of a car. It'd still be heavy to move down stairs, but I suspect that the boxes would fit if you put them on a two-wheel cart and move slowly. If needed, you could take the parts out of the boxes and move each part seperately- the base cabinet is one piece, the table is made from three pieces of cast iron (one assembled to the base, and two that get bolted on during assembly), the motor and plate it bolts to are loose, and the legs are pieces of angle iron that you need to assemble. Fence and rails come in the third box.
At a guess, the heaviest bit (the cabinet, trunnions, and middle section of the top) was about 50-75 lbs, with volume somewhat similar to an average benchtop saw.
IIRC, I paid something like $600 for it, and it's a heck of a nice saw- I would imagine that most contractor-style saws in that range come broken down in a similar fashion. If you're looking at something like the Delta, I could measure so you can figure out whether or not it'd fit down your stairs, if you like. While I do like the DeWalt for what it is- it may not fit your needs if you're looking for a "real" saw, and are only looking at it because it's easier to get into the house..
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Thanks, that's the type of description I needed.

I'm not sure we're talking about the same Dewalt saw. I'm referring to the $950 DW746X, which was an Editor's choice in American Woodworker over competitors such as the $850 Delta 36-431 contractor's saw, and which got good reviews from other magazines. The advantage it offers for my small shop is the cabinet-saw-like design. Since the motor doesn't hang off the back, it doesn't require as much floor space.
Is there anyone here who has this saw who can describe how it's packaged when you buy it? Thanks.
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wrote:

I went to the DeWalt site and took a look at the DW746X
It looks similar to the one I just bought, a General. I know, different brand, but there's similarities. It's obvious that the fence and left & right extension wings are separate. The black plastic cover on the right side is no doubt a separate item, and the switch is certainly loose too. So what you're dealing with is the center yellow portion topped with the center cast iron piece. The motor and trunnions are attached to the top and hanging right under it. I'd guess the thing is about 175 lbs. Total weight is 254 lbs according to DeWalts website.
My nephews moved my saw into my basement and wanted to carry the thing themselves. I had to insist that they use the refridgerator dolly to take it down. It was really easy that way.
But my point is that with a couple of strong young guys, a saw like your DeWalt would be able to be manhandled into the basement.
A couple of guys once brought over a dryer that they carried on a sling that was draped over each of their shoulders. Maybe something like that could be done here if need be.
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I dealt with this a couple of years ago. Got a Unisaw down my basement steps. We removed the cast-iron top. It comes right off with 4 large bolts, one in each corner. This not only gets rid of a lot of weight, but also gives you a few inches more clearance, and makes it less top-heavy. Also took off the height and tilt adjustment knobs (for more clearance).
With the top off, me and a buddy got it down the stairs on a hand truck. Putting it back together required re-aligning the top with the blade, but that wasn't that hard.
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