Basement Shop, Narrow Stairs--Table Saw?

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I have a small basement shop with steep, narrow stairs that take two bends on the way down. Because of the difficulty of getting things down the stairs, my shop is equipped with benchtop tools. The only exception is a Delta 6" inch jointer that we were able to take down in pieces. (Needless to say, I don't assemble any large cabinets down there.)
I would like to get a real table saw, so I'm wondering if anyone can recommend a good model that would be easier than most to get down stairs. What I'm hoping in particular is that certain models come partially unassembled, so the pieces would be manageable enough even though the whole saw wouldn't be.
I'm interested in something in the $500-$1,000 range, where some of the better-reviewed saws seem to be the Ridgid 3650, the new Craftsman models, and the Dewalt. Since my shop is small, the compact size of the Dewalt is especially appealing.
Thanks for any advice.
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wrote:

Most any contractor's saw (real CS, not just a "site" saw) should fit quite easily with the legs, wings, and motor removed.
Depending on the turns, a 10" cabinet saw should also fit, if broken down into body (with or without motor), wings, and top sub-assemblies. The body section will be heavy, which is where the turns will come into play as the carriers try to maintain a grip. Planking the stairs an sliding it down, roped from the top of the stairs, may be an option.
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wrote:

I was most concerned about the weight, since that's what gave us the most trouble getting the jointer down there, and it probably weighs only 200 pounds, half of what these saws weigh.
Since I've never assembled/disassembled a saw, I have no concept of what the main subassemblies are or how heavy each of them is. It would certainly be easiest if the largest piece was under 200 pounds.
If you take the legs, wings and motor off a CS or one of the hybrids such as the Dewalt, is that about the max you can break it down? How heavy is the body after that?
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IMHO I would worry less about weight right now, and go for the best machine I could afford. Then round up friends, relatives and a case of beer and lug the boxes down the steps.
Drink the beer after the saw is downstairs!
Seriously, the 1023s I mentioned in my previous post weighs in around 360 pounds. However the heaviest single piece is the body, including the main table casting, which I would guess is in the 200-220 range. The cast iron wings, the fence, fence rails, etc are all rather heavy but manageable. The cast iron top and motor could be removed; but, if you had a moving dolly and a couple of buddies you should be able to get it downstairs without total disassembly.
Regarding assembly. It took 2-3 hours to put mine together. Another 2-3 hours to tweak adjustments (some of that was playing).
Do Not comprimise the quality of the machine by selecting one that weighs less. It might not be sturdy either.
Ron
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wrote:

Not very.
The main weight of a contractor saw is in the motor, top, and wings. There's some weight in the body from the trunnion, but it's really not that bad.
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wrote:

We brought a Ridgid TS3650 down into the basement here. It comes disassembled to the point you need it to be. By the time you get everything that isn't the main part out of the box it really isn't that bad. We took everything but that out and then used a hand truck, but really at that point the two of us could have carried it.
Keep in mind the stand comes in about a billion pieces and you'll be tightening bolts on your knees for so long you'll be longing for the joyful time you were carrying the saw down the stairs.
-Leuf
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wrote:

That's the truth- I think I spent about 2 hours fiddling with bolts and an hour running a 220 line before I even got to turn mine on.
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On Sun, 26 Nov 2006 02:00:52 -0600, Prometheus

How'd you run the 220 over? Individual leads in conduit? Or something else?
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On Tue, 28 Nov 2006 01:46:45 GMT, George Max

Three wire 12ga. Romex. Tacked in place with plastic wire staples in the rafters, and a plastic cover over the vertical drop to the recepticle. My shop is in the basement, so garage or commerical wiring requirements like conduit or MC wiring don't apply (at least, as far as I know)
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wrote:

Careful with that -- I remember a post from a few years back in which someone described removing the top from (IIRC) a JET JTAS-10 to make it easier to get down the stairs -- and as soon as he did so, a handful of shims which had been installed at the factory came out.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I have the reverse problem. My shop is in a loft 15 steps above the garage with a tight turn at the bottom. I purchased a Jet Supersaw. As delivered the wings are not attached. We strapped the saw (table, cabinet and motor) to an appliance handtruck and humped it up the steps. It weighs about 230 lbs. Then just assembled the remainder of the saw. With a good handtruck just take one step at a time. Of course check the saw's width without wings against your stair width. Only took my BIL and I to get it up one step at a time and both of us are less than 5' 6".
On Nov 22, 6:31 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

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Chris Wolf wrote:

will fit in any stairwell I've ever seen .. .. if weight is an issue, remove the motor before trying to get it down the stairs.
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I think you will be fine with about any saw in your price range. Your back might complain but they should fit with some help. I own a Griz 1023s which is rather heavy. But with wings and fence rails removed it is about 24" square x about 3' tall. The 1023 should be representative of about any good contractor or cabinet saw. Just buy one and assemble it downstairs.
BTW the 1023 is a very good value for the money. Even with shipping you might get one at your upper $1,000 target.
RonB
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I removed the top from my Delta Unisaw and my brother and I took it down my basement stairs. I then placed the main body in the mobile base, installed the top and wings and with a dial indicator trued the top to the blade. Installed the table board, legs, fence and was finished.
I also brought down those stairs a Delta 14" closed base band saw, 10" radial arm saw, Jet closed base 6" jointer, a Ridgid full size drill press, Ridgid 13" planer, Gizzly stationary belt sander with stand and a 1.5 hp Delta dust collector.
No problem getting them down the stairs but if I ever sell my home and would rather make a deal with the new owners to buy everything from me and start over again. Too damn heavy to carry up the stairs.
It can be done, just depends on how bad you want it.
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Forget the stairs. IIRC, a few years back it was on this newsgroup that someone had a simple solution. They cut a hole in the floor and cut a portion of one joist, lowered the tools down to the basement, then patched the floor.
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Thu, Nov 23, 2006, 4:59am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@snet.net (EdwinPawlowski) doth sayeth: Forget the stairs. IIRC, a few years back it was on this newsgroup that someone had a simple solution. They cut a hole in the floor and cut a portion of one joist, lowered the tools down to the basement, then patched the floor.
I was wondering if anyone was gonna come up with that. I think I'd make a trapdoor, that'd make it handy to get big projects out.
JOAT Democratic justice. One man, one rock.
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I owned a small rowhouse once where a previous owner had actually done this to get a furnace into the basement.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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On Thu, 23 Nov 2006 01:26:52 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

I don't know why home builders don't consider their designs when it comes to getting things in and out. What do they think, furnaces and such last forever?
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George Max wrote:

Because home builders are interested in selling houses, not living in them. If home buyers were more discriminate, builders would stop the nonsense.
Mike
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On 27 Nov 2006 18:07:17 -0800, upand_at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I wonder why my sister "allowed" the builder of her home to put the basement entry in a narrow hall in the center of the house. No way in hell is anyone getting anything serious down there.
The last time I toured a model home while considering having one constructed for wifey and I, I inquired about what I refer to as a "trap door." I know they're actually called something else, but when I was a boy, a lot of homes in the area I grew up in had a pair of exterior doors at an angle to the ground that provided access from outside directly to the basement. There was of course a door at the bottom of the steps in the actual basement wall (foundation).
The salesman looked at me as if I was crazy. Why would anyone want such a thing?
One of my closest friends had a house built for his family 2 years ago. It's a really nice house, except it too has basement entry in the center of the house and the stairs get about 1/2 way down then meet a foundation wall and turn to the left to reach the floor. How is one to bring much of anything in that way?
Narrow hallways, ill considered corridor placement and width, narrow entry doors, I just don't get why people accept this.
Especially in light of super restrictive HOA rules that may not allow the use of a garage for anything but car parking and preclude construction of an out building.
What's the world coming to?
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