Base Moldings from mdf


I was unable to find the type of base moldings that I want to use in my house and I don't want to pay for someone to make them custom. Essentially, all I want is flat 5" molding with an an 1/8 or 1/4 roundover on one edge. This would be complemented by a shoe mold which I can easily find. The whole thing painted white.
Is there any reason not to get a 4x8 sheet of mdf and cut 5" strips and use those as a base mold?
~ Wyatt
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no problem as long as water doesn't come in contact.mdf and water dont mix.i wouldn't use them in the kitchen.i would also prime all 4 sides.also hd carries mdf shelving which is 11-1/2" wide i believe,you could get two 5" pieces out of one board.a little more expensive but a lot easier to handle and rip on the ts.also wear a dust mask this stuff is very dusty.hth
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Wyatt wrote:

I did something similar, but made the entire baseboard from mdf. I didn't anticipate the amount of sanding that would be needed so if I were to do it all over again I would probably do something like you are going to do. From a cost perspective I saved a lot of money as I did a large amount of linerar feet. I agree with the other poster about priming and sealing all four sides, especially if there is a chance that it will get some water contact. Tho only other downside is that the outside corners are fairly suseptible to damage depending on kids, traffic, etc. Otherwise, it has worked out great for me.
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I'd say the only drawback might be that you will have a joint every 8'. If you don't have many long walls and if your installation at the joints is good, you will probably be the only one to notice the joints.
Mike O.
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wrote:

If you buy the bulk preprimed and not finished moldings you can get the MDF 12' ers at Lowe's .
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Another vote for the pre-primed stuff. MDF will suck up a LOT of paint. The less cutting of it the better.
I could be mistaken, but when I did the trim for our basement, I'm pretty sure the local orange Borg had it in 16' ers.
--
Frank Stutzman


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On Fri, 23 Dec 2005 19:04:44 GMT, "Leon"

I think the OP was wanting just a round over on a 5" tall piece so was asking about using 4x8 mdf sheet goods. I agree if he wanted a pre-made mdf base, the longer 12' or even 14' pieces would be the way to go.
Mike O.
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Check with a building supplier that provides materials to home builders and you should be able to find a wealth of MDF trims. If they don't stock what you want, my guess is that they can order it.
I would not go the 4x8 route. Having a joint every 8' is not a good thing.

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Thats pretty much what I did for my shop bathroom. I had some 5/8" MDF - cut it to 4" strips - ran it thru the router table for a roundover - primed w/ kiltz - installed and painted white.
Looks great.

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