Base cabinet for front-load washer?

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I will be remodeling my laundry room shortly and will be getting a front loading washer. Given the condition of my back, I am thinking about putting it (and the dryer) on a base cabinet to raise it up around 14-16 inches. I can easily make the base to match my other cabinets.
Do I need any special design considerations for the base or its top? I imagine the appliances would want to walk some, so a lip would be in order and the dang things are heavy, but I normally build beefy. I am thinking of a tiled top for the cabinet... Any info/experience would be appreciated.
Cheers, Shawn
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On 7/2/2011 7:09 PM, RimaNeas wrote:

This is just my opinion but it seems that it would have to be quite solid and fasten to the wall. Have you ever seen a washer walking across the floor when things get out of balance?
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A number of the front load washer manufacturers make pedestals for just such a situation, and you should investigate that route before committing time and money into building one. They're not cheap, but if you keep an eye on eBay and Craigslist you could probably scoop one up for a reasonable amount. A drawer in the store-bought pedestal base is a major benefit, and the pedestals usually bolt to the underside of the machine so there's little danger of the thing walking off.
R
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A word of caution: Not all pedestals can be mounted to all machines easily. They intentionally change mounting patterns and the like to keep this from happening.
We mounted one on the dryer with a help of a couple of drills and sheet metal screws. It just took a little work.
Puckdropper
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They do walk sometimes and a 1" lip would be good tiled top would not be any good as if the machined decided to take a trip somewhere, the movement would crack the tiles. I built one out of 14 ply 12" high and cut the corners out of the top piece for more stability for the feet of the machine. You could go over the top and put a drawer in it for the washing liquid etc. I only went 12" high because of the dryer on top of the washer.
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I recently built one. 2x4 construction for the frame screwed to the wall, with oak plywood on the sides and OSB for the platform painted the same color as the walls. The oak matches the trim in the house and was left over from another project. Total cost less than $20 and looks a whole laot better than the $250 for the store bought ones. I got the washer up by tilting it side to side while my wife put a 2x4 under the high side. Tepeat ten times. I put a lip on top but the LG washer has dynamic balancing and does not move
wrote:

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$250? Maybe if you're paying full MSRP. Check the completed auctions on eBay. You can get one for well less than half that if you are patient. Factor in time, the fact that you have to take the machine off of your platform to service it, whereas the bolted on pedestal moves with the machine, the painted steel pedestal is less susceptible to water damage, etc. I would think that the pedestal designed by the manufacturer to go with the washer would match the machine perfectly, so I'm not sure how a homemade one could look better. Not trying to rain on your parade, just offering the OP different opinions.
R
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I'd think the vibrations of the washer's spin cycle would be pretty tough on glue joints, not to mention the problems with exposure to water.
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"RimaNeas" wrote in message
I will be remodeling my laundry room shortly and will be getting a front loading washer. Given the condition of my back, I am thinking about putting it (and the dryer) on a base cabinet to raise it up around 14-16 inches. I can easily make the base to match my other cabinets.
Do I need any special design considerations for the base or its top? I imagine the appliances would want to walk some, so a lip would be in order and the dang things are heavy, but I normally build beefy. I am thinking of a tiled top for the cabinet... Any info/experience would be appreciated.
Cheers, Shawn
-----------------------
Save your money and time, each wash. Get an old fashioned top load and have some actual storage cabinets above it on the wall.
With a top-load washer your clothes will actually get clean in less than four hours of waiting without detergent residue to irritate your skin. If you want to save water get a suds saver machine. The fad is fading, from poor user experience, just as it did back in the 50s and 60sm before, due too many problems that haven`t been fixed yet. It`s all hype no matter what the sales con-artists are telling the wallets. I have experienced a few very expensive machines.
Flame away
mike
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------------------------------- That's your first mistake IMHO.
Start with a front loader.
You will be much happier.
Lew
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On 7/3/2011 8:16 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Eh?
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
To reply, eat the taco.
  Click to see the full signature.
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I wrote:

--------------------------------- "Steve Turner" wrote:

-----------------------------------
DUH!!!
Try top loader.
Lew
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------------------- I just figured that you were using a double negative. As in stay the hell away from those totally hyped front loaders. eh?
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Not flaming but we have had front-loaders for about a year now and love them. We have \had them long enough to be sure our water and gas consumption are down. Wash quality is great. Granted, a year isn't a valid test of durability. But our daughter's family of seven, who has been using the Sears front loaders for six years without problem is.
Addressing the OP - We considered building the base for ours before we started serious shopping. I was concerned about the wear and tear of spinning. As it turned out, we made a sale deal that was cheap enough it wasn't worth the time or money to build it.
RonB
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Ditto on the front loader. Works fine, quiet enough, cleans well and four or five years in. The only thing I find irksome is the beeping when the load is done doesn't automatically shut off.

Another ditto. I used to build everything for every thing, and now I pick my battles. A washer stand is not high up on the axis of evil list, so store bought (on sale) it is.
R
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Shawn-- 16' is a good height for me. It leaves just enough room underneath to store the essentials - and still fit under the cabinet above. 'Beefy' may not be adequate enough without extra support. ;) It seems that a very thick top helps. My guess is that otherwise it acts a trampoline. Mine is double - to hold dryer also. The unt is 32" deep by 61" wide. I started off with a 2x4 box with 2x4 'studs' every 9" or so. 2 more sets cross the middle with about a foot between them. --------------------------------- | | | | |------------|----|--------------| | | | | --------------------------------- Top was 3/4 ply. It's on carpet on a concrete slab. Washer would walk all over. Adjusted feet, great for that load, then it may or may not walk the next load. Added more 'studs'. No change. Added another sheet of ply to top and a small piece of trim around feet to act as a corral - just in case.. The extra ply cured it. It may be that it's double-wide, but that would seem to make it more stable, not less.. I don't know how the manufacturers can make them out of thin steel. The appliances are LG. Don't consider tile until it's been well tested - if then. I'm interested in your results. --Joe

I will be remodeling my laundry room shortly and will be getting a front loading washer. Given the condition of my back, I am thinking about putting it (and the dryer) on a base cabinet to raise it up around 14-16 inches. I can easily make the base to match my other cabinets. Do I need any special design considerations for the base or its top? I imagine the appliances would want to walk some, so a lip would be in order and the dang things are heavy, but I normally build beefy. I am thinking of a tiled top for the cabinet... Any info/experience would be appreciated. Cheers, Shawn
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-- A little correction - that's 16 inches, not feet. The diagram works in my text editor, but not in my newsreader. Just make everything line up.
Shawn-- 16' is a good height for me. It leaves just enough room underneath to store the essentials - and still fit under the cabinet above. 'Beefy' may not be adequate enough without extra support. ;) It seems that a very thick top helps. My guess is that otherwise it acts a trampoline. Mine is double - to hold dryer also. The unt is 32" deep by 61" wide. I started off with a 2x4 box with 2x4 'studs' every 9" or so. 2 more sets cross the middle with about a foot between them. --------------------------------- | | | | |------------|----|--------------| | | | | --------------------------------- Top was 3/4 ply. It's on carpet on a concrete slab. Washer would walk all over. Adjusted feet, great for that load, then it may or may not walk the next load. Added more 'studs'. No change. Added another sheet of ply to top and a small piece of trim around feet to act as a corral - just in case.. The extra ply cured it. It may be that it's double-wide, but that would seem to make it more stable, not less.. I don't know how the manufacturers can make them out of thin steel. The appliances are LG. Don't consider tile until it's been well tested - if then. I'm interested in your results. --Joe

I will be remodeling my laundry room shortly and will be getting a front loading washer. Given the condition of my back, I am thinking about putting it (and the dryer) on a base cabinet to raise it up around 14-16 inches. I can easily make the base to match my other cabinets. Do I need any special design considerations for the base or its top? I imagine the appliances would want to walk some, so a lip would be in order and the dang things are heavy, but I normally build beefy. I am thinking of a tiled top for the cabinet... Any info/experience would be appreciated. Cheers, Shawn
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Thanks for all the responses... a lot of new info here. I initially saw the price of the factory pedestals at $250 each, seemed silly since I could build a double-base for $100--I will be building the other cabinets in there at the same time. But I will look on Ebay for sale items. It also sounds like I should go M1-Abrams beefy for the cabinet if I make one--double 3/4" walls, mid-span brace, and a double 3/4" top, bolted to the wall studs on 3 sides. I wonder if I can also just bolt the washer/dryer to the cabinet from the underside...
Thanks again. Cheer, Shawn.
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"RimaNeas" wrote:

------------------------------------------ Build 16" tall stud walls using 2x4's. Add 2x4 joists, then cover with 3/4" ply on both sides and top, but not bottom.
Add 2x2 "fiddles" (Found on marine interior counters as follows:
2x2 x "L" where "L" = appliance dimension - 4".
Add 1/2" carriage bolts inset 2" from end.
Drill 17/32" holes in top to accept bolts.
These "fiddles" can now be dropped in place to retain appliance or pulled up to make sliding appliance out easier.
Figure on installing some kind of tile on 3/4" ply top since small foot size on the washer foot will gouge a low point if allowed to bear directly on plywood.
Alternate to above:
Buy a commercial item, it will be cheaper.
Lew
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Addendum:
See bottom of post for comment.

--------------------------------- The above suggestion is based on building a riser big enough to support both a washer and dryer.
Lew
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