Barn siding question

Hello all, I am building a small shed 10x12 with plans from Betterbarns.com. I like the look of t&g vertical siding, but I hate t-111. Are there any cost effective solutions, or do I need to bite the bullet and buy cedar for big bucks ?? One other question... can I use t&g pine or pine shiplap. If yes, are there special precautions I need to take.
Thank you for your time. <cross-posted on alt.building.construction>
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Jack,
I don't know where you live but I'm sure you've probably driven through older neighborhoods that were built back in the 20's or so - right? Well, those single car garages were typically built with shiplap siding (pine being one choice of wood hereabouts) and then primed and painted using oil based paints. They're still standing and those that were tended too over the years with a fresh coat of paint every generation are still looking good in our neighborhoods. I dare say, they'll outlive the plastic garages....
When you're building the shed be sure to prime and/or seal (Thompson's or other sealers) those pieces which will be subject to having snow up against them or pieces that will be more exposed to rain such as trim where it acts as a ridge. On my shed, I sealed those pieces on all sides and especially the ends by letting them sit in a container and soak up the sealer in the endgrain. Instructions will tell you how long the wood must weather with the sealer on it before you can prime and paint (~30 days).
Then I really screwed up and used the Home Depot brand of primer and paint (alkyd based). The paint lasted about 3 years and the primer is now showing thru. I'll use a different brand as soon as we get dried out here in the northeast - lesson learned.
Bob S.

yes,
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Hardiplank, if you can deal with not using wood. If you can find a source of economical pine, just buy some boards and seal with a good stain. If you can find a local mill, pine is cheaper than T111. Of course you need to dry it, or find some that has been stacked for a few months. Put the shed on treated skids and get it off the ground on blocks, if possible. Wilson

yes,
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Jack,
If I were you I'd buy some common pine, nice wide boards to build it. I have a barn built in 1889 (pine boards I think) and a few years back we added a garage to an old post and beam machine shed (now my workshop) and the entire building was clad in pine board and battens. One suggestion when adding the battens is to either nail them between the boards onto the framing or if you wish to nail them to the boards, just nail one side of the battens and in a year or so nail down the other side. Another nice look is to consider an angle on each edge of the battens.
I suppose you can seal the cladding if you want but we did nothing and after 5 or 6 years it matches the old barn that's right next to it.
Glen Duff ----------------
Jack wrote:

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I have built many small buildings for shops, wood storage, generator switch gear etc. and keep going back to board and batten. Here in Maine we pay $.50 per bf for 10 inch pine, rough sawn. Where are you located? Dave

yes,
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