Bandsawr recommendation

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How do you make them without electricity or gas?
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http://solarcooking.wikia.com/wiki/Eggs_&_Cheese
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Neat, but I still need bandsaw recs..
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wrote:

Thanks for the information. I'd certainly consider the Laguna models you're referring to if I had that kind of budget (and 3phase power). Barring any emergencies, I suppose I could save for a few more years or so to get where I could buy that, but in the interim I have a list of projects, but without a saw (and I've been waiting already as it is). I don't dispute the capability of the saw, but at the same time, if I went by this logic, for me, I'd have a house with 10,000 square feet and 5 bathrooms for just 2 people, and I'd drive a Dodge 3500 to pick up milk & eggs at the grocery store.... Of course there wouldn't be any money left to buy anything other than milk & eggs, but that's another story!
Cheers
These saws do not require 3 phase power.
Capability of the saw was not the main point I was trying to indicate. The $1000 saws will do what the Laguna saws will do but you will probably find that you spend as much time tweaking the saw each time you use it as you do using it. Maybe not, you may be happy with what the saw is capable of producing. Band saws have a lot of adjustments that all need to work in concert with each other to deliver a good cut. The better built the saw the less the adjustment in one area will affect adjustments in other areas. I have been doing serious wood working for a bout 30 years now, started when I was 23. I have been down the road of getting the tool that was adequate but through trial and error and experience learned that the tool that is the easiest to use and does what it is suppose to do is the one that you are going to value and actually use the most.
I do not know your financial situation and will not pretend to know what is best for you. But, you did indicate that you wanted your first and last BS. IMHO $1000 saws are not going to be your last unless your experience with them is so bad that you give up on them all together. And while a new saw gives that "new car" satisfaction and you don't think you will mind making adjustments, more often than not the new does eventually wear off and the adjustments become an irritant. Imagine having to readjust your TS rip fence every time you changed blades or started a new project. Even this is necessary with most less expensive BS's. If you look at an earlier post by GarageWoodwork he was commenting that his $1000 saw was not giving him the results he was looking for when resawing 6" wide cherry. He seems to think the fence is the problem. Out of the box so to speak my Laguna was giving me oak veneers that you could see through, with no fence adjustment at all.
Additionally every one seems to have an opinion as to which "brand" is the best blade to use for this or that. Oddly with my Rikon I had the worst problems with the top brand blades. The free blade that came with the saw actually worked the best as did the blade that I had made at a local shop. It was a crap shoot every time I tried a new blade as to whether it would perform decently or even track correctly. So far in the last 3 years it has not mattered which blade I put on the Laguna, the freebies that came with it, the Timberwolf's that I purchased myself, or the Laguna ResawKing blade, they all track correctly and with out any need to ever readjust the top wheel tilt between blade changes.
$1000 is a lot of money to spend on a piece of equipment that you would not use an equal amount to other tools costing that amount.
Again IMHO you might be better served to look for a good used older Delta BS, something 7-8 years or older and not put out the money on a more expensive new saw with features that you may not like. Test the waters with a less expensive saw and learn what will make the saw do what you want it to do. Unfortunately BS's unlike most all other shop equipment do require much more user input to keep them cutting optimally. The less you have to make those adjustments the more you will enjoy the saw in the long run. You will actually find other uses for your BS....LOL... I now use my BS to cut up fire wood that is too large to put in the fire place. And oddly I learned that older fire wood is a great source for cultivating your own exotic spalted veneers.
Good Luck with your hunt!
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Sorry, I missed the Laguna model number in your post the first time I read it this morning. My mistake! I will check this out, thanks!
On Jan 11, 9:59 am, "Leon" wrote:

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On Mon, 11 Jan 2010 04:37:15 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Leon is advising the "last" bandsaw you'll ever need. Of course, that depends on your needs. I'm strictly a hobby woodworker. I use my bandsaw about once a week. But I do small boxes and turnings, so I wanted good resaw and log cutting abilities. On a limited budget.
I wound up with the Rikon 14" deluxe. It has two speeds and the low speed has sufficient torque that I've cut up 12" walnut logs on it using a sled. It has a 13" resaw capability, even more than the 18" model. I've also cut 1/16" veneer, although 1/8" is a lot easier.
Leon mentions problems with roller guides. I only saw those when I was cutting green wood. After I cleaned off the blade I sprayed it with one of those dry lubricants and never had the problem again.
The Woodcraft store where I worked part time has sold a *lot* of these saws. I can only recall one coming back and I don't remember the reason.
Take a look at:
<http://www.toolcrib.com/blog/2008/12/02/best-14-bandsaws-grizzly-vs - rikon-vs-powermatic-vs-laguna-and-more>
The Rikon came in 2nd only to a Grizzly model. But the Grizzly only had a 6" resaw capability.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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I'll check it out - thanks!
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I bought an 18" Jet about seven years ago using similar criteria (first and last). Can't testify regarding last yet (because I'm still breathing), but I have been quite happy. I saw quite a bit of 8/4 hardwood for custom rocking horses and other projects and the large table is a plus for that. It has plenty of power for 8/4. I have resawn thicker but admittedly resawing use is limited.
A couple of minor cons: 1) The lower rollers are a pain to adjust, but easier with experience 2) It uses an odd-length blade that seems to be proprietary to that saw. But if you have a local source for custom fabricated blades you might get them made cheaper than retail anyway.
Might look at Grizzly too. They have some similar machines.
RonB
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2) It uses an odd-length blade that seems to be proprietary to that saw. But if you have a local source for custom fabricated blades you might get them made cheaper than retail anyway.
Might look at Grizzly too. They have some similar machines.
RonB
Odd length blades are not really a big problem as I have learned although I cannot buy locally unless I have one made locally. My saw uses a 150" blade. Timber will make any length blade you desire in a wide variety of styles. Like their premade blades they charge by the inch and I was never charged more per inch for a custom length than for a stock blade. And their service and knowledge is pretty good. They do want you to be happy with their product.
When my Rikon BS was on order I ordered blades from Timberwolf for it. I was able to immediately start using those blades when I got the saw. Unfortunately I had tracking problems that could never be resolved even with calls to Timberwolf first and later to Rikon. Timberwolf asked me to cut one of the problem blades to see if it would lay out straight which it did and was suppose to do. Long story short they replaced that blade free of charge and after returning the Rikon and buying the Laguna they took the shorter unused blades back in exchange for the longer blades for the Laguna. I only had to pay for shipping and the difference in the price for the extra 16 or so inches on each blade.
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Leon, while I've got it in mind, I wanted to ask you, have you used your Domino to attach 3/4" thick face frames? If so, how well does it work for that purpose?
Thanks
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Yes!
Back in October I was working on the bedroom towers project where I was assembleing the 2 frame and panel sides, back panels and front face frame to the 4 seperate shelves, top, bottom and 2 mid shelves for each tower All of the outer panels and face frames attached to each of the shelves with 8 doiminos on each shelf, 2 per side of each shelf. The corners of the outer panels and face frome were simply glued to each other. Basically each outer panel attached to 4 shelves with 8 total domino, 32 dominos total. That was enough to worry about aligning properly as I had 4 different style outer panels/face frames on each unit.
A trial dry fit to see if I had been lucky enough for all 32 dominos to come together on 8 selerate planes resulted in a cabinet that could be stood up, perfectly fitting, with no fear of seperation.
Was that what you were wanting to hear? ;~)
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wrote:

Yes, thanks. What I've used for the past 15 years or so for projects with hardwood veneer is a Lee Valley mini plane with a little chisel that raises a sliver of wood, bang in a nail and then glue the sliver back down. Unfortunately, the quality of the hardwood veneer on some of the plywood I've bought hasn't been all that great and it's often difficult to raise the shaving properly and glue it back down without it being noticeable. It works better on hardwood face frames, but occasionally it's noticeable where I've raised the shaving.
In all honesty though, I might just be looking for additional reasons to buy myself a Domino. :)
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Well what I/we do is simply nail through the face frame on the kitchen jobs. It is easier to desguise the nail on red oak. We put masking tape over the spot to receive the nail and shoot the nail through the tape. This keeps the putty out of the pores or grain of the surrounding wood and keeps the putty in the nail hole. And the nails are mostly to hold the cabinets together until the glue dries as we do dado the backs of the face frames and cabinet panels. We typically assemble the cabinets for a complete kitchen in 3-5 days after cutting the plywood panels, milling and assembling the face frames. Swingman and I have often done this in two locations. I typically cut all the plywood panels, I had 27 sheets of plywood to cut up one day for a double kitchen we were doing. He mills and builds the face frames. We get together to put all of our parts together...Fortunately they have always fit, then we install. IIRC we have done 5 kitchens so far this way.
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

Mentored an absoulute newbie woodworker making a floor to ceiling linen cabinet - for a SECOND floor location - with a 90 degree change in direction of the stairs - with a fairly narrow landing.
Had to assemble the sides to the front on site since it was 30" wide, 20" deep - and 94 1/2" tall. Dry fit in the shop, disassembled, carried the parts upstairs and did the glue up in position. Top and bottom and middle dominos were "tight", the rest "loose" (as in longer mortises). Used the outriggers and refereneced off previous mortises to run down the front to side dominos. As long as you start from either the top or the bottom - and the vertical elements are the same length - everything comes out fine at glue up time.
God help the person who wants to move this thing in the future - either on the same floor, or tried getting it down those stairs.
BTW - she cut a few of the mortises wrong - somehow - but we just glued in a domino, let the glue dry and trimmed it flush. Then recut the mortise in the right location.
The source of the miscut mortises is an easy to make mistake - accidently referencing of the bottom of the DOMINO foot rather than off the bottom of the "fence" (see this link http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/Mentoring_LinenCabinet/Mentoring_LinenCabinet7B.html
The DOMINO is like the early HP programmable calculators - a solution looking for problems to solve.
Hope this helps.
charlie b
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wrote: Snip

http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/Mentoring_LinenCabinet/Mentoring_LinenCabinet7B.html
Yup I always advise that with the Domino and with a PlateJoiner to always reference/index off the fence rather than the machine bottom surface.
A slightly warped piece of stock, debris under the stock or depris under the machine can throw off the cutting location.
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Yeah. I'm still adjusting to a new environment. When we lived in the city we had a couple of sources for custom made blades and I could usually get them in a day or so. We recently moved to SE Kansas and I haven't scoped out local sources yet.
RonB
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On 01/10/2010 05:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The 513 is likely a decent saw. For a bit more you can get the heavy-duty version, which has a larger table, cast iron wheels, and an upgraded fence. The guides are slightly different as well...not sure if they're actually an improvement or just different. For another $100 you can get the foot brake, which is nice if there might be others around since it lets you stop the blade quickly.
I've got a Steel City 18". It's roughly equivalent to the G0513X2B but with a smaller table and crappier fence.
It has no trouble tensioning a 1" blade, it holds its adjustments reasonably well, and I use the foot brake a lot. On the downside, the fence isn't great, and the blade guard needed some modification--from the factory it's difficult to install large blades without removing the guard. I've resawn 8" of dry hard maple without difficulties, and it went through almost 12" of green birch for turning blanks with ease.
Chris
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I have the Grizzly G0555 with the riser and it's handled everything I've thrown at it with ease. Regular cuts, scroll cuts, resaw. Most I've ever resawn was almost 10" red oak - no problems.
Vic
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