Bandsaw versus Tablesaw question

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On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 11:07:23 -0500, Brian Siano

========================================================You have already gotten at least 10 replies to your question BUT I have not read any of them... YET.... I will as soon as I fire off my opinion...
Sure a Bandsaw is capable of ripping lumber... just a little slow at doing it... and I guess that the accuracy could be equal...the quality of the cut itself most likely would be ok BUT not nearly as good as the cut a good tablesaw will produce..
Personally I would use a tablesaw 100 percent of the time if given the choice... Honest I would..no ands' no ifs' and no buts'
BUT in the 40 or so years I have been a serious woodworker I can not recall more then 2 or 3 "kickbacks" ever occuring when using any of my tablesaws ... .and every one of those were caused by some stupid thing I did ...all could have been avoided if only I had put my brain in gear ...
I think your tablesaw is just not "set up" correctly or you do not put your own brain in gear before you hit the power switch...
Now I guess I will look what others have posted... I know there will be a few that do all their ripping on a Bandsaw... I just like to use the correct tool for the job... and for ripping my tablesaw is the correct tool
Bob Griffiths
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board?<<<
Your not even playing on the same ball field. Each has it's own merits. RM~
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On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 11:07:23 -0500, Brian Siano
......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
I bought a BS years ago, ad never regretted it. It's not even a very good one. I had to learn a few things about what wentr wrong, but when I did it performed well, and has bever kicked back <G>
I bought a TS and have regretted it ever since. But that's me. For me it was an expensive purchase that did not suit me, and I could have bought a heap of other tools (or _wood_) for the money.
To me, the TS is very demanding. It needs striaght wood, it needs a great deal of setting up and alignment. It needs real care when using it, I feel above and beyond most other tools.
I think you will get more out of a modest BS than you will from a modest TS.
I actually break all rules and use a 14 TPI metal cutting blade in my BS, and get quite a good cut. It does not need finishing for many projects, as long as the cut is striaght. I cut hardwood with it, and have no trouble. It also stays sharp far longer than the normal blades.
It's not much use for sheet good, though <G>. But then, I would use a hand circ saw and finish _that_ with a router.
BSs are far safer, but you still lose a finger. I reckon the difference is that you could have something to sew back on, whereas apparently a TS simply shatters the lot in many cases.
BSs are much less a machine and more a tool, IMO. That's why with care you get better results from a modest BS than a modest TS.

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wrote:

Yep I agree it is you...and honestly there is nothing wrong with that...if it works for you that is all that is required..

Here I completely disagree... I can not determine what you mean my demanding...BUT I sure do not think it is at all demanding...
And my using a sled (with a staright edge ) to clamp the irregular shaped piece of rough cut lumber I can run it thru the TS without any problems to get a perfect straight edge...absolutely not a problem...
Every time I change the blade on my Bandsaw I have to set everything up again...adjyst the fence to account for the drift of the blade, adjust the guides above and below the table etc... BUT the last time I spent setting up my TS was 15 years ago when I bought it...Not exactly true as I have checked it out every few years but rarely had to spend 10 minutes doing any adjustments...

You have so I will not dispute that fact... But from my experience I would say just the opposite... To each his own I guess...

Here I have no clue...I never had the guts or need to put on a metal cutting blade in my Bandsaw...

Got news for you working alone my Cabibet Saw is not my machine of choice for working with a 4x8 foot piece os sheet goods...I also pull out the circuar saw and a straight edge...and go at it on the floor...

Bob Griffiths
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proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
hmmm...apparently we are each welcomr to our opinions, but just need to point that out....

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On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 11:07:23 -0500, Brian Siano

A band saw does a poor job ripping. A table saw is the best tool for ripping. The band saw needs constant adjustment and tune up, but it is more versatile than a table saw. A band saw is probably safer than a table saw. A band saw produces lots of fine dust. I prefer the band saw when doing small cuts or cutting small pieces. I'd probably miss my table saw more than my band saw, but I like both.
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That depends on your definition of "poor job" and what type of ripping you're doing. If you mean finish-quality rip cuts, ready for glue-up, sure, a band saw does a lousy job of that. They're not intended for that purpose.
OTOH, for ripping rough stock to approximate dimensions, the band saw excels.
Oftentimes, boards are cut at the mill with their edges not parallel to the grain of the wood. IMO projects look better if the edges of the boards *are* parallel to the grain. I can't think of a better tool than a band saw for doing that sort of rip cut.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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I love the bandsaw. As alexy said, if I could have only one power tool it would be the bandsaw.
The bandsaw is unmatched for resaws and curves. It also does a credible job with tenons. I always rough cut on the bandsaw since the bandsaw won't kick back if you encounter reaction wood. Also, since the bandsaw doesn't care about board twist, you need not joint the rough lumber prior to rough cutting it.
It will rip reasonably well, but the rip width is limited to the throat depth of the bandsaw ... and the cut will not be as smooth as the table saw. Still, with a decent blade it will be reasonably smooth and will clean up in one or two passes of a handplane.
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On Sun, 20 Feb 2005 09:13:16 GMT, Nate Perkins

Sometimes, it's the only way to rip with power.
Yesterday, I was working with a bunch of 8/4 hard maple, 9-12" wide, my jointer is 8" wide. After drawing some guidelines, I was able to freehand rip with very little waste. This wood is heavy, so there were several times where I needed to reposition myself. Stopping to move while holding the board in place with one hand is perfectly safe on a bandsaw, I get the heebie jeebies even thinking about it on a tablesaw.
I could then face and edge joint the parts, plane them to thickness, and rip to final width on the table saw.
Barry
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No outfeed on the table saw Barry?
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On Sun, 20 Feb 2005 08:19:28 -0500, "Mike Marlow"
My TS outfeed is 4 x 7, but why would that make a difference?
This is wood that is not yet prepped for table saw ripping. I'm ripping it down to less than 8" wide. The wood is neither straight or flat, and quite heavy. Ripping it on a table saw at this stage is asking for trouble.
Barry
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kickback.
Ditto. Jim

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C'mon.
Out of Nate I'd expect it, based on his other "contributions."
Surely you must realize that there are two sides to that blade. The distance to one is (supported) infinite, the other limited.
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Well, that was reasonably nasty. Hope you have a nice day, too.

No, really???
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On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 11:07:23 -0500, Brian Siano

Alright- before I get into my experience ripping with the bandsaw, I'd just like to point out that I've just got a little sucker, so a nice big bandsaw may be a different story.
As far as my experience goes, ripping with the bandsaw works just as well as doing it on the tablesaw, but it leaves a lot more saw marks than a nice blade on the tablesaw. Where it really shines is making stopped cuts- instead of having a curved cut that takes out more material than necessary, the blade is perpendicular to the face of the stock, and leaves a nice clean inside corner. Was using my bandsaw for that today when making the frame for my router table, as a matter of fact, and it worked beautifully.
The elasticity of the blade is really going to vary depending on the width of the blade, the amount of tension on it, and your feed rate. If your saw isn't set up properly, and/or you shove the stock in too quickly, you can get a bowed cut, but with a little practice and a rip fence it's not too terribly hard to get a nice straight cut. When the blade starts to go, it will have a tendancy to walk to one side, unlike the table saw.
As far as safety goes, my opinion is that it's quite a lot safer than a tablesaw, though that does not mean that a bandsaw is always the right tool for the job. It's quite a bit more fussy when you change blades, and the depth of your cut is limited by the depth of the throat on the saw. Of course, if you're making a curved cut it's the best way to go- so your needs are going to dictate which saw is better for you.
Then again, you've already got a table saw- get yourself a bandsaw and keep the table saw as well. You can move a lot of your jobs to the bandsaw if that makes you feel more comfortable, and still have the tablesaw to do those things which the bandsaw cannot do easily.
Hope this helps.
Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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