BandSaw Question

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I wasn't aware of the four for three deal. I bought two with one being slightly under $18 and one being a little over. Not exactly twice, but not enough better in my opinion to warrant the extra cost - (if you don't do the same deal you did).
Don

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I also read the reviewed on FWW, I went ahead and bought Timberwolf's blades with the recommendation of folks here. Timberwolf blades were really disappointing even after replacement from Timberwolf. I than tried LV Viking which, I believe a repackage of Timberwolf and I am not impress at all. My next purchase will be an Olson "normal" or Olson Pro, which cost less than Timberwolf and Viking.
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Interesting. Read the review and bought a Woodslicer because of the rating. I'm going back to Timberwolf or the LV equivalent.
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"To each his own" :-)
Happy New Year, and may your Timberwolf's blades bring you further the pleasure of woodworking for years to come (on offence intended).

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What was your beef with the Woodslicer, Ed?
David
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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It cut OK, but I think the Timberwolf tracked better, straighter. It is not a "bad" blade, but I think I got better results with the other. Could also be the way I work, be that good or bad.
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What problems have you have with them ?
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I bought two blades, and tested only one. It make a "tumbling" sound, you can see the blade moving in and out slightly, even after repeated adjustment. When I called, to tell the of the trouble. They send one replacement blade, and told me not to throw the blade as they might want it back. The replacement blades does not fair any better. It's like sawing the lumber using (metal) hacksaw.
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proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
I would be interested to know exactly what went wrong.

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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
S'OK. Read your other reply. Sounds like it was not welded straight or something, if other blades did not do this..

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wrote:

Even a new bandsaw could use a tune up. Get Duginske's "The Bandsaw Book." Band saws can be rather finicky and there is a big difference when they get out of whack. It is normal for a bandsaw cut will leave some ridges, depending on the blade, type of wood, feed rate, etc. For resawing, you want the widest blade, blade lead adjustments, and possibly a high fence.
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Also another quick question, in the manual it says to place the thrust bearing four widths of a dollar bill behind the blade, while finewoodworking says to adjust it to just touch the back of the blade. What do people here do?
Okay and last question, when setting the guide bearings the manual says when tightened they should still move, does this mean move without moving the blade? Or does it just mean be able to turn (I suspect the former).
Thanks again, Damian
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My approach with both the thrust bearing and the guide blocks (I have blocks, not bearings) is basically, as close as I can get it without actually touching.
For the thrust bearing this means bring it up until it touches and then back it off until I can just spin it. For the guide blocks it's a little more of a judgment call, since they don't spin and they don't have a screw adjustment to back them off. I don't really know how guide bearings are supposed to go, but my guess is that I'd use the same approach as for the thrust bearing.
wrote:

-- jc Published e-mail address is strictly for spam collection. If e-mailing me, please use jc631 at optonline dot net
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I use blocks on my G0555 instead of bearings. I simply bought a 1/2" oak dowel and cut into small pieces that I use for blocks. Doing it this way, I can pinch the entire blade without worry about damaging the gullets. It provides great support and replacements are dirt cheap.
Don

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Wouldn't using wood as a guide generate a great deal of heat?
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damian penney asks:

Why would using wood as a guide generate more heat, than, say steel.
Charlie Self "A politician is an animal which can sit on a fence and yet keep both ears to the ground." H. L. Mencken
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Well I figured that metal would generate less friction than wood, but seeing as the whole point of the blade is to cut through wood I guess it doesn't matter :)
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