Bandsaw metrics

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"Larry Blanchard" wrote...

My grandfather bought his farm with money earned in the shipyards during WWII. He cut trees, peeled them and provided them to the electric company so he could have electricity to the house. They installed the poles and ran wire to his house. He then went to work wiring the house.
His first project? He wired the outhouse. That way he did not have to fire up the kerosene lantern to use the facilities. The bathroom came a couple years later. People traveled from miles around to witness this new, modern wonder. Just imagine! An outhouse with an electric bulb burning just inches from you head while you were using it. It was considered very modern at the time.
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On 2/9/2014 10:20 AM, Swingman wrote: > On 2/9/2014 8:55 AM, Jeff Thies wrote: > >> I needed a 16mm to remove a faucet a day ago. Every metric set I have >> jumps from 15 to 17... > > Damned faucet manufacturers seem to delight in making attachment 'non > standard', particularly when dealing with "cartridges" and their > replacement installation. > > I'm still waiting on Kohler to deliver parts for two, 12 year old > faucets, on the same vanity, which failed within days of each other. > > Synchronized obsolescence.
I'm afraid this goes way back and wasn't invented in Asia.
Back in the early Seventies I managed to shear off the threaded portion of a microphone stand (in a particularly foolish way) and decided to see if I could avoid buying a new one.
There was a tool & die place just up the block from my parents' house. I showed it to the guy, who - although there'd probably have been no profit in it - said he could rethread it quickly for just a few bucks.
I said that would be great. He took out a gauge of some kind and tried to match it up with the mating threads. Nope, too coarse. He grabbed the next one. Nope. Too fine. With a puzzled look he explained that 27 threads per inch was what was needed, apparently unique to the mike stand trade. And still the case, I believe.
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On 2/9/2014 2:29 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

And that is where a thread file comes in handy:
http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/58635/i/bikemaster-8-in-1-thread-repair-file
note the 27.
Requires patience, and perhaps drinking.
Jeff

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On 2/9/2014 2:40 PM, Jeff Thies wrote:

1. Thanks for the tip. I didn't know such a tool existed.
2. It wouldn't have helped. Although usually behind a keyboard, I was getting a rare turn out front as the lead singer, back when I felt I was qualified. For a dramatic, if cliched, ending, I would jump up in the air (to my full vertical leap of a few inches) and the band would accent the last note when I came down. One night I came down on the cast iron base of the stand while holding the top of the stand in my hand. Luckily is was the stand that broke, rather than my ankle. The threaded bit broke away from the pipe completely.
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Doubtful. 26mm is less than 1 1/32".

Where are you shopping, that you have trouble finding a 1 1/16" socket?

More likely to work than 1 1/8"...

16mm and 5/8 inch are basically interchangeable. The difference is less than 0.005".

You can buy 16mm sockets at Sears.
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On 2/8/14 6:44 PM, G. Ross wrote:

I always had good luck finding large sockets at the local auto part chain store (Auto Zone). Prices are tolerable for something you may only use once and it beats waiting for an order to arrive. -BR
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On Sat, 08 Feb 2014 20:44:29 -0500, G. Ross wrote:

I've run into similar socket problems on power tools and on motorcycles. So far, all of the sizes I've needed (and I'm sure one was a 26mm) I've found at Harbor Freight. Not the highest quality, but these are not tools I'm going to use every day
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On 2/8/2014 8:44 PM, G. Ross wrote:

Another incident comes to mind.
I bought a bike for my daughter a number of years back. The assembly instructions listed the tools that would be needed; including an adjustable wrench. I'm no grease monkey, but I have basic sets of sockets in English and Metric sizes. I figured the "adjustable wrench" recommendation was for those poor benighted souls who keep their entire complement of six tools in a kitchen drawer. A "handy" fellow like me wasn't going to fool around with an adjustable wrench.
Turns out the nuts - TWO different sizes - were non-standard.
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On Mon, 10 Feb 2014 16:12:48 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Yeah, I have several adjustable wrenches, in both metric and imperial sizes. Some are both metric and imperial size. ;-)
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On 2/10/2014 7:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

<snip> > Yeah, I have several adjustable wrenches, in both metric and imperial

I know it's a joke, but I have exactly such a beast, with an SAE scale on one side, and a metric on the other.
Jeff

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wrote:

I was referring to the "8in" on one side and "300mm" on the other. ;-)
They probably have the scale on them too (pretty useless, so I don't remember).
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On 2/11/2014 8:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

True. They're not nearly accurate enough. I set my adjustable wrenches with a dial caliper before applying them to the nut.
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wrote:

;-)
How about just putting it on the nut and turning the knob until it fits?

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On 2/12/2014 11:20 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Then what would I use the caliper for?
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wrote:

Weld it to the bolt to keep it from turning?
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On 2/12/2014 10:20 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Because that is how they did it in the olden days.
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wrote:

Rather than welding, I prefer to Loctite my wrench to the nut. Once it sets up, I can turn the nut without fear of the wrench slipping. When the nut's finally tight, a few seconds with a propane torch takes the wrench right off.
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 2/12/2014 4:38 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

I just glue my wrenches to my nuts :-) That way I don't have to go looking for them later ;-) See: http://imgur.com/HOj8zoV
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G. Ross wrote:

Received the socket today. A very nice looking socket. And it WAS made in Taiwan.
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 GW Ross 

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