Bandsaw Guide Question

I'm looking for Bandsaw, and teetering back and forth between a 17 in. Grizzly (G0513), and the 14 inch. (G0555). Looking strictly at company literature, the 17 inch. sounds like a do it all saw (at least for me). But reading a review in American Woodworker, the 17 in. receives a less than favorable rating when using smaller blades, given that the saw comes equipped with European style disc guides. The article states these are difficult to adjust correctly for smaller blade sizes. Checked out the Lonnie Bird - Bandsaw book from the library, and it states that European style disc guides are the easiest to adjust. In some ways, it seems the more information received the tougher my choice becomes.
Re-sawing is something I'll only do once in a while, but I'm the type who likes having tools that are open to the possibilities. The impression I have thus far, is that the 14 in. would actually be better for misc. smaller work, while the 17 in. will be much better at re-sawing larger stock, and perhaps less accurate and more difficult to use on smaller pieces. If the 14 in. is purchased, that would come with the riser block as well. Any thoughts?
Does anyone here have experience using the larger 17 in. saw with smaller blades, say in, and if so would you please share your thoughts, on the Euro disc guides?
Thanks,
Dave
Links to both saws:
http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2004/067.cfm?
http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2004/064.cfm?
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Go bigger.
Disk guides _may_ suck with small blades, it depends on the amount of backlash you have (probably enough to be annoying).
For small blades, use Cool Blocks, not disks or bearings. It should be possible to arrange some sort of alternative guide holder to suit.
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<snip>

smaller
I would always go with the bigger saw if you have the space, and there isn't much difference in the footprint between a 17" and a 14".
I've used euro stye guides, radial bearing guides, composites and even greased hardwood, IMO the composites win every time. My experience with the euro guide is that with the narrower blade it runs at the very periphery of the discs and there is sufficient play (after a few hours running) to deflect about the centre of rotation until limited by the back edge of disc contacting the opposing side.
In general the bigger saw gives you much more versatility, I've used a 3/16" blade on a 24" saw with no problems, the advantage of the larger saw is, all other things being equal, the more robust construction allows greater tension on wider blades; generally the limiting factor on blade width is whether you can get sufficient tension on the thing.
BernardR

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Ordered the 14 inch. (G0555).
For my use, I'm thinking the 14 in. with riser should suffice. If bigger is better, bigger will be an 8 in. Grizzly jointer (instead of the 6) - should everything go smoothly with this order.
Dave

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I bought the G0555 and found it difficult to adjust the guides. Called Grizzly and ordered the guide assembly that uses the blocks instead of the rollers. It works fine now and I've been largly happy with it. Doing it all over again, I'd probably go with the G0513 simply because I do re-sawing more than I thought I would. Interesting point about the small blades (which I use quite a bit too) and if that's true, I'm glad I have what I do.
Don

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Don, what was the cost on that?
After reading what I have about guides, it might be worth checking out.
Dave

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