Bandsaw Coplanar

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Maybe. And you don't know how much negative tilt you can get from the tracking adjustment. My Delta is also close, and I didn't bother to shim for no-load coplanar. Frankly, I don't see any real benefit, and a reasonable possibility I won't have enough tracking adjustment if it flexes beyond coplanar under tension.
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On Fri, 27 Mar 2009 12:34:48 -0500, Leon wrote:

Hmmm. I should have read your reply before I posted :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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If the blade is tracking properly, leave it alone.
Stop reading so much.
Do what you think is reasonable maintenance and leave the "fine tuning to death" to the other folks.
If it cuts reasonably straight, don't do anything else to the machine.
Spend your money on good blades.
-MIKE- wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

That's generally my opinion when it comes to instructions. :-)

Good advice. Thanks.
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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wrote:

It's not at all vital unless your wheels have flat surfaces. If the wheels are crowned, and the blade tracks properly, it's a good as you're going to get it. If the wheels have flat surfaces, parallel is necessary, but coplanar is necessary only if the blade has to track at a specific location on the wheel. My metal cutting bandsaw has flat, hard surfaced wheels so the blade tracks with the teeth just proud of the wheel edge to avoid disturbing the blade's set. Parallel is needed for the blade to stay on the wheels, co-planar is needed so the blade tracks at the proper location. That's not the case with a crowned, soft-surface wheel.

Has no effect on drift. That is totally dependent on the blade condition; tension, set, sharpness, guide locations, etc.

If it's so far out of plane that the blade won't ride on both wheels at the same time, then it's too far out of plane. If the blade tracks properly, you're fine.

Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Thanks a bunch, Tom.
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-MIKE-

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