bandsaw blade for resawing

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I've used wood and phenolic too, but the ceramics are especially handy when cutting turning blanks, where all the pressure is against the inside guides. They _don't_ wear, which is what I like. Soft ones are too fussy for such heavy work.

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Several years ago a magazine editor touted high tension as the wayyo go. Shops were greeted with bearing replacement work and editor reportedly was pounding pavement. I tried the ealier version Woodslicer on the Rockwell 14" that needed high tension, read about the fad the editor caused and tried Suffolk and haven't looked further.
On Thu, 03 Jun 2004 02:35:12 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (Adrian Mariano) wrote:

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I don't own a table saw, so my band saw gets a lot of use. Below is what I've gathered from reading too much and using my saw. As you have found, there is a lot of conflicting information on this group and the web about this issue.
I've never tried them, but the Woodslicers are supposed to be really good because they have a really thin kerf and uneven spacing of teeth, which reduces vibration. As a result, they are good if you are resawing highly prized woods. At $30 a pop, I would definitely not start with them as a newbie, especially since I would expect it to wear like a carbon steel blade.
I also haven't tried carbide, but I would not try that as a newbie, either. They are very expensive and relatively fragile (carbide chips easily). Unlike a table saw, you end up changing band saw blades relatively frequently, which can lead to damage with each change. I think carbide only makes sense if you have a dedicated saw that you can leave the blade on all the time and you have a really powerful motor. The carbide blades have a much wider kerf than standard blades, so it takes a lot more energy to cut through the wood. (Note that also means you turn a lot more wood into saw dust.)
As far as carbon steel (or silicon steel), either Lenox or Timberwolf should work fine. I have used both and I think the differences between them are mostly in marketing. Timberwolfs are highly promoted, relatively easy to find, and their website has a lot of information on it about band saw blades. Lenox blades are more difficult to find and their website sucks. You can order Lenox blades online at carbide.com. As I said, I've used both and they seem to perform the same to me.
If you are using a carbon steel blade for resawing, then you need to be really careful about not overheating the blade. Once you overheat it, which is not that difficult to do when resawing, the teeth will loose their temper and the blade will be worthless. The blade is dull if a) it starts drifting really badly, b) the speed at which you can cut slows down significantly, or c) you get a lot of burning when you are making straight cuts.
Another option is bi-metal blades. They cost about 3x as much as carbon steel and are supposed to last 10x as long. I have a Lenox, bi-metal, 1/2", 4 tpi (Lenox Pro II) that I've been using as the main blade in my saw for about 9 months and it's still going strong. That includes resawing a lot of hard maple. I would prefer to have a bi-metal, 1/2", 3 tpi, but Lenox doesn't make one and I had a lot of trouble finding any other source for bi-metal blades. Of the blades that I've used, it seems to work the best for resawing. You don't have to worry about overheating the bi-metal blade. Also, since it dulls much more slowly than carbon steel, you end up adjusting for blade drift much less.
If I were you, I'd order a either a carbon steel, 1/2", 3 tpi blade or a bi-metal, 1/2", 4 tpi blade, depending on your budget. If you go with carbon steel, then when it gets dull, you can decide if you want to spend the extra money on a bi-metal blade for the next one or just buy another carbon steel blade.
Mark

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A much wider kerf? What is the kerf of a standard blade? This seems like information that is generally not supplied. The Woodslicer claims 1/32" = 0.031 inches. The Lenox carbide is 0.056 inches according to the review web page I cited. (The actual band is 0.025" thick, the same as everybody else.) I could not determine the kerf on the Timberwolf blades from their web page (except for the AS-S at .048"). Nor could I determine the kerf of the lenox bi-metal blades.
Now the review I referred to made it sound like the carbide blade opened up a whole new world for the reviewer even though he had a small 14" saw like mine. In other words, he felt like he could do stuff he couldn't do with the regular blades he'd tried before---not that the carbide blade merely lasted longer. On thing that seemed noteworthy was the claim that because the blade stays sharp it cuts straight for a long time whereas other blades quickly start to cut less straight as they dull. If true, this may be very useful for veneer cutting, say, especially in abrasive woods. There's also this in between blade, the carbide "impregnated" blade made by Supercut that Lee Valley sells (for about $50). Somebody who posted to this group liked this blade, but it doesn't seem to have been much talked about.

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1/2" and it is relatively thin. The (spring) pressure required for a given tension (psi) is a proportional to the cross section of the blade. Since the cross section is *thin* x 1/2" applying adequate tension should not be a problem since your saw should theoretically be able to tension a normal gauge 3/4" blade.
Buy the WS.
Sadly, I trashed my WS by hitting a nail in a reclaimed beam. I will be replacing it eventually, when the TW blades just won't do.
-Steve
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me too...
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I have a Wooodslicer. I hardly ever take it off my saw (a 16" MiniMax) unless I need to go down to 1/4" for tight curves. I have several Timberwolf blades as well (that I bought after using the WS), and I don't like them. Thicker kerf, they don't cut as fast (or as clean), they don't track as well, and they make about 3 times as much noise as the WS.
Adrian Mariano wrote:

PSHAW. My MiniMax is probably strong enough to snap the dang blade, but I normally use low-to-moderate tension and it works great. I might crank it up a bit if I'm resawing something tall, but nothing your saw shouldn't be able to manage (especially after an Iturra upgrade). As long as you get it tracking correctly, it shouldn't need significantly more tension than any other blade.

Yeah, probably a good idea. Not because the WS requires it for general purpose use, but for resawing something taller than 6" it would help with most any blade you use.

One more PSHAW again. I've had my WS for almost 2 years now and it still cuts great. I'm not a high-volume user, and I have no idea how many board feet I've pushed through the saw, but enough to know that the claim of a very short life span is false.

I considered going with a carbide blade at one time, but not since getting the WoodSlicer. Even the MiniMax reps advised against it, especially on the smaller saws (less than 18"). The blades are necessarily thicker to provide support for the carbide, and the stress of spinning a thick, tight-radius blade at high tension can cause the welds to fail and the carbide tips start popping off. Not something you want to have happen on such a high-dollar item.
--
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2004 02:35:12 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (Adrian Mariano) wrote:
Do they have a website?

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