Band saw vs. Scroll saw

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I was telling a friend that I intended to purchase a scroll saw (Dewalt 788) and a band saw (still deciding between Jet 710115K, Powermatic 1791216K, and the Grizzly G0513).
He said, "Heck, just get the band saw and use that for scrolling.
Okay, I realize that the scroll saw can scroll both exterior AND interior designs whereas the bandsaw can only cut exterior.
But ... other than that one limitation, how does a high quality band saw (like the Powermatic or the Grizzly) compare to a nice scroll saw?
Jack
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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:

For one thing there are spiral scroll saw blades that will cut in any direction. You can cut tighter radii with those than with any bandsaw blade.
A scroll saw lets you do finer work than with a bandsaw.
Scroll saw blades are cheaper and easier to replace, but (I think) wear out faster.
A bandsaw will cut stock of appreciable thickness much faster because it sweeps the sawdust out of the kerf no matter how thick the piece is. A reciprocating blade loses effectiveness when the thickness of the material approaches or exceeds the stroke length.
--

FF


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You can cut interior holes with a bandsaw, if you're willing to cut and reweld the blade. There are small blade welders for the purpose.
mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:

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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

Yep, he's right. Did he also tell you that you don't need any screwdrivers since you have butter knives? Different tools, different functions.
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wrote:

wait a minute... I thought it was "you don't need any butter knives since you have screwdrivers", not "you don't need any screwdrivers since you have butter knives"....
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I had alsways heard it as " You don't need butter knives if you have putty knives"
Scroll saw will do extremely detailed work in stock of moderate thikness (1" or less)
Bandsaw is limited in the radius of the curve by the depth of the blade but will cut much thicker stock.
You can back out a cut in a scoll saw, try the same thing with a bandsaw and on mine the blade falls off the drive wheel.
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I thought it was "You don't need any chisels if you have putty knives".
--
Jeff P.

Check out my woodshop at: www.sawdustcentral.com
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On Thu 22 Sep 2005 03:23:11p, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in

The band saw's great for larger work, and with something like a Carter Stabilizer and a small blade, you can do some really fine work with it. But snipping the blade and rewelding it isn't my idea of a great way to do intricate scrollwork. I'm sure it's possible and I'm sure you could get to the point where you could do that with a bandsaw blade as fast as you could change the blade with a scroll saw.
But if'n I had the wherewithal to get both, I would most certainly get both.
If I had to have just one for a while, it's the bandsaw. I'm probably only saying that because I don't have a working scrollsaw yet but I sure have found plenty of uses for the bandsaw, and so far no times when I had to go borrow somebody else's scroll saw.
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On Thu, 22 Sep 2005 14:23:11 -0600, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

I can buy a decent scroll saw with what I've just spent on bandsaw blades. They're pretty much entirely different tools, and the budget for a usable machine differs by a factor of at least 4 or 5.
If you _can_ do it with a scroll saw, then a scroll saw is probably the better tool for it. But there's a huge amount where only one or the other can really achieve it.
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The best thing about a scroll saw is that you can cut out little French cleats for your tool drawers...that sounds kind of krude doesn't it? NPI
Don
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Did I write "krude" what I meant to write was c-r-u-d-e. k...c... same thing right?
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klose enough
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wrote:

I've heard this called "French fitting" before, but IMHO, "French cleats" are the battens with an angled ripped edge used on the back of a cabinet, to hang it on the wall.
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at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

There is some overlap in what a bandsaw and a scroll saw will do but they have different emphasis. As you pointed out, a scroll saw can do interior cuts, and can easily make a smooth cut that reqires no sanding. If you are going to do mostly fine, intricate cuts, fretwork, toy making, etc. the scroll saw would be a good choice. If you are making larger projects with "furniture sized" curves using thicker stock the band saw would be best. If you choose to buy only one, a good jig saw like the Bosch or Milwaukee will enable you to do much of what the other saw can accomplish. Another option would be to purchase a good bandsaw and a cheaper scroll saw, The smaller Delta and similar models in the $150 range can do pretty good work at the cost of increased vibration and discomfort of operation.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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What tyes of saws are we really taliking about comparing...
Scroll saw Bandsaw Saber, or jig saw
When I read the original post I though of only stationary saws...
Oh well time to grab another cup of coffee and try to get my brain in gear...
Bob G..
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<...snipped...>

I believe the OP was talking only of stationary saws also. What I meant was that if the OP had a good hand-held jigsaw, it could do much of the work of either the scroll saw or the band saw, so a possible alternative to having both stationary saws would be a jig saw and whichever stationary saw would be most useful for the work he is doing.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Bandsaw = powered Bow Saw. Jig Saw = powered Key hole saw Scroll Saw = powered Coping Saw / Fret Saw
(for about 90% of the time.. ) If you can't figure out how you would do it with hand tools, a power tool will get you no-where faster and with less effort.
Phil
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Phil wrote:

and more noise.
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FF


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The scroll saw can make cuts that fit back together perfectly. You can't do that with a bandsaw. I wouldn't use a bandsaw to make a jigsaw puzzle.
mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:

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I'd use a jigsaw...to make a jigsaw puzzle...I'd use a scrollsaw to make a scrollsaw puzzle..
John Emmons

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