Band Saw Rip Fence

Does anyone have an idea on where I can find a rip fence for a Craftsman Electronic Band Saw? According to Sears the fence that was made for the saw is out of production. They have what they call a Universal Rip Fence, but it does not fit this particular model of band saw. The table is constructed in such a way that it will not accept the mounting hardware that comes with the universal fence. I am really between a rock and a hard place and would appreciate any input. Thanks
Andy
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Ethan asks:

Try www.mulecab.com. I'm pretty sure their fence will fit on almost any bandsaw, and it's a damned good fence.
Charlie Self "It is even harder for the average ape to believe that he has descended from man." H. L. Mencken
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I'm not a fan of manufactured fences.They have a habit of screwing you up if you have a blade leading, or you have to move the guide up farther than you need to clear the fence, and then there are those rails sticking out to whack you on the head every time you stoop to pick something up. Clamps and boards for rips, pivot blocks for resawing would be as easy, and maybe a bit safer.

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If you talking about a resaw "fence" or guide, I just made one out of a piece of scrap hardwood. Round the end off on the benchtop belt sander and hold it down the desired distance from the blade with a clamp. I have several that are different widths so I can keep the blade guide down as low as possible when resawing.
Ethan wrote:

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My problem with using clamps is that my band saw is built on a cabinet and there are no openings under the table to attach a clamp to. But, I threw a home made fence together this afternoon. I'll give it a try. Thanks for the come back.

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angle iron. C clamp.
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I usually clamp a jointed straight and 90 degree piece of wood to the table. Tapping one end or the other allows compensation for drift. For stopped cuts, blocks can be screwed or clamped to the wood.
If you haven't tried this, try it before you spend big bucks on a fence. I've done the same on my router table.
Barry
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I agree with Charlie. The Mule Cab is nice. You may have to do minor surgery like drilling holes that line up with the mounting bracket.
http://www.mulecab.com /
Layne
ps, usual disclaimers apply.

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