Band saw choice

One of our sons asked me this question:
Got any info on how to choose a good band saw, wondering what rpm, blade, size would be good for ripping oak branches up to 4" in diameter?
He makes rustic furniture from oak branches he recycles when he sees a tree being cut down. I DAGS but wasn't able to sort through everything to get him a succinct answer.
Thanks.
Lionel
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Try Suffolk Machinery with your question, makers of Timberwolf blades. 1-800-234-SAWS
On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 13:08:29 -0500, "Lionel"

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Thanks.
Lionel
wrote:

tree
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On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 13:08:29 -0500, "Lionel"

Up to 4" logs, most of the "home workshop" grade 14" (wheel diameter) bandsaws will happily saw them.
IMHO, go for a welded steel frame, not cast iron. Lagunas and MiniMax are nice. If you've got the money, go for an 18" - you'll not regret investing in a serious bandsaw.
One thing you will definitely need is a log-sawing sled. JOAT posted this link recently, which is the sort of thing you need (but maybe bigger). http://www.ship-modelers-assn.org/tps0105.htm
Mark Duginske's "Bandsaw Handbook" (Amazon.com product link shortened) is worth having too. Especially for the advice on choosing blades - and as a bandsaw is just a machine for moving blades around, then you should invest in an appropriate range of good blades. Timberwolves are well spoken of for heavy resawing on small machines.
-- Smert' spamionam
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Hmmm, I would have guessed the opposite (for any tool). Why do you think the steel is better? Ed
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wrote:

Better ability to deliver tension, for a given frame size.
Maybe this isn't an issue on large machines (although a steel 18" is also easier to move around than a CI one). On a 14" machine though, you can tension a wide resaw blade on a good steel frame that you can't on an iron frame.
-- Smert' spamionam
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Thanks. I'll pass this on . . . and maybe use it myself when I save up a few more dollars.
Lionel
wrote:

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I just got the Grizzly 14" Ultimate (marketing hype here) band saw and turned it on last night. So far so good. No vibration, easy to put together, looks solid (about 190 pounds) and is VERY quiet. I've cut some 1/16 sheets off a 2x4 just playing around today and have been happy so far -- of course, in a couple of years, I may be regreting the choice, but so far it seems to do what I need.
On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 21:04:31 -0500, "Lionel"

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Delta is considered better than average. I found my 14" Delta to be excellent and well-built. Nothing replaces a good chain saw for his application.
On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 13:08:29 -0500, "Lionel"

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