Bad advice on YouTube?

Seems like it, according to what I've read elsewhere, including on the wrec.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuzBpeNR9CU

At 8:30 or so he glues his breadboard ends rigidly onto his tabletop. And at about 9:30 he attaches his tabletop to the frame with screws that have no provision to allow wood movement either.
I have no personal experience with wood movement, but these are both no-nos, right?
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On 3/19/2015 1:33 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Ah. I see in the comments that he has clarified that he only glued the breadboard ends in the middle. He seems to agree with another commenter that the screws won't be a problem, as they are small and can bend. I'd be curious to know what people here think about that.
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On 3/19/2015 12:40 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I don't do bread board ends because I think the exposed end grain looks better than the ill fit between the ends of the bread board ends and the front or back edge of the top during seasonal changes. The top is going to expand or contract and the joint fit on the ends at the front are going to be be off. It results in one of those appearances that you tried to get the joint close, but missed.
Alternatively you can make a relief cut 1/8" and about the same depth so that the mismatch is separated by that relief cut and not so noticeable during seasonal changes.
As far as attaching, the top his way is simple but small screws may break. I would laying the support pieces flat and pocket hole them into the side apron. Drill 3/16" holes through to the bottom of the top and use a washer head screw to attach. This give much more wiggle room for expansion and contraction. I typically use my Domino to cut an expanded slot rather than a 3/16" hole.
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Greg Guarino wrote:

The ends should be fine as he did it. I don't ever recall using one but I've made LOTS of half laps which, of course, pit grain in one direction against grain in another. Same for any other type of joint doing that, including bridle and mortice/tenon. I've also inlaid smallish (2"x12") pieces cross the grain of another. Never had a problem which doesn't mean that the line along the joint stays chock-a-block, may crack slightly, may not..
As far as the screws, I agree with Leon that sloppy holes and washers would be better but as he did it should present no problems...at worst, the screws would break which IMO is highly unlikely; more likely that the screw holes get slightly enlrged.
dadiOH
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Considering the number of poor shop practices illustrated in that video, I think poor design is the least of the bad examples you could take from it.
Anyway, I think he said it was quartersawn oak, and it's a small piece, so movement will be small. He'll probably get away with it.
John
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"John McCoy" wrote:

------------------------------------------- You said it first.
Must admit his sleds were creative, not necessarily functional.
Lew
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Yeah, his time would have been better spent putting a blade guard on the sled rather than a fancy fence.
John
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On 3/19/2015 1:33 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I didn't view it, but just because you can does not make you an expert. And there are lots teaching bad things out there.
There are some excellent videos though of some amazing craftsman. If you are looking for a good source, look to Paul Sellers, as he would probably fit with your limited space and equipment. He really is a good teacher. Not the only way to do things, but he is fundamentally sound.
--
Jeff

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On Thu, 19 Mar 2015 19:37:02 -0400

Interesting videos and techniques I like the oiled rag in the tin can simple and cheap and effective in 1st wall clock video I also like his sketch book that contains historic record with drawings and notes
and watching him work I wonder for that type of project how much time would be saved if he used power tools
I'd guess no time would be save using power tools due to tool setup I think it'd be a wash and maybe advantage to hand tools
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On 3/26/2015 1:12 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

There's a nice thing about using hand tools. Learn to use them and you are not limited. There are many things hand tools can do quicker than power.. (setup).
There are times when I work at night and the wife is asleep. I'll use hand tools to avoid the noise.
It's kind of nice.
When dealing with very small parts I'll do it by hand.
Now if I can just get motivated...
--
Jeff

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On Thu, 26 Mar 2015 20:21:32 -0400

Yup watch his video at a fair cutting a dovetail joint in minutes flat

Yes the thought of how quiet is good, many times when I'd like to tinker quietly I am limited
but I have very few of those tools that he has but will be getting some soon

forget about what's it for or where it's going just do it because you enjoy it
this is what I remind myself
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On Thu, 19 Mar 2015 13:33:58 -0400

i have seen bad advice on youtube so not a surprise
still need to look at the video
I like turning videos and one piece of advice that was good but funny was that if you're turning at over 1,000 rpm the piece will go vertical but under and it just falls to the floor if it comes off the lathe
not bad avice but really better to say make sure it doesn't or can't come off the lathe
knock on wood, not been hit yet with lathe projectiles
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On Thu, 19 Mar 2015 13:33:58 -0400

i watched it now it depends on who the piece is for doesn't it it's not going in a museum soon so don't let pursuit of perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

I didn't like the breadboard ends and the tenon but I don't think there's any rule written in stone about doing what he did
it's a design decision that he likes

no big deal, it's just an end table, you'll be the only one that ever notices if there's a problem, ok your woodworking friends will notice

no idea if they are no-nos, not even sure what that means, maybe you are thinking fine furniture and then they are no-nos
a nice table done simply and there're lots of other ways to do an end table
I might have not done a tenon and just used a narrower end and glued it on and had less overhang of the table top then the rails could provide some stiffness for the ends
he made a nice table
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