Axminster Woodturning jaws.

I've had an axminster clubman chuck for a year or so and have only used it with the type C jaws. er, this is my first bash with an expanding chuck in case you can't guess from the rest of the post.
These have a dovetail on the outside and a lipped internal grip on the inside.
http://www.axminster.co.uk/product-Axminster-Type-C-Dovetail-Jaws-21941.htm
After one or two disasters with the expanding dovetail on bowls where i had left insufficient wood around the outside of the recess to withstand the forces - and that the internal recess can be left on the bottom of a bowl but its not a great feature - i have tended to use the internal lipped recess for most stuff and then take off the stub after finishing.
originally i would turn a stepped spigot to fit the lip - but i had one or two of those fly across the room with the "stepping" bit splitting. So i took to just doing a straight spigot.
But it tends to slip occasionally.
Two questions then - what does everyone else use - the inside stepped or the outside dovetail. If you use the inside stepped do you turn a stepped spigot or a straight one.
And would a different internal shape be better for bowls such as the serrated one on the type H Medium gripper or the dovetailed ones on the Type A ? (eg the kids don't know what to get me for xmas...)
Thanks
Ken
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Ask over at rec.crafts.woodturning. But I'm an inside dovetail guy myself. Allows me the freedom to finish the bottom before I reverse to hollow. You can do a few cutsies or just leave the recess, wherever the muse takes you.
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d160/GoodOnesGone/bb09ce26.jpg
The serrated types have their own problem set. They gnaw the tenon, which itself steals depth from the bowl, and they're a PITA or impossible to get a bowl recentered once they do. With smooth jaws the force is widely divided, so you don't exceed the elastic limit of the wood.
Remember, you're not holding with a "grip" as much as you're holding with the nose of the jaws bottomed in the recess or against the shoulders with a dovetail tenon. Sort of like flat work, the dovetail just holds it from being retracted, the shoulder or end bears the load.
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