Automatic dust collector


Hello,
Does anyone out there have their shop wired, such that when any of the large tools are switched on, the dust collector will come on at the same time? I've figured out a relay circuit, but I wonder if there is a simpler solution.
Thanks
Curt Blood Amateur Furniture Maker
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My simpler solution is a remote control. I keep it next to my safety glasses and hearing protector and clip it onto my belt when I get started and it stays there until I'm done for the day. Then anywhere I am, if I need it I just push the button. I have seen current sensing devices that can be placed in the circuits that power certain tools that will switch on the DC when they sense current draw but for a single person shop, I personally think that is just a waste of money.
--
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It's been awhile since my last electricity class but I think a current sensing device is basically a relay set to go off when you turn on your saw or whatever.
When I finally get tired of walking over and switching on the DC I'll probably go with a remote, mostly because I can think of times when I'm turning the saw off and on a lot but I want the DC to keep going.
Dan
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saw
The last time that I looked at one, the sensing circuits were a little more complicated than that although most of the higher power ones did contain a relay or contactor to carry the load. The down side was that you needed to have a separate sensor on each circuit that had a power tool you wanted it to respond to ($$$$) and the DC had to be on a circuit that was NOT monitored.

I went with the remote because too amny times I would set up for a cut and realize that I didn't start the DC and just make the cut (and mess) without it.

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I thought long and hard about adding an auto switching device to my 2.0 Hp cyclonic DC, but frequent on/off cycling is a number #1 killer of electric motors. The instruction manual that came with my machine says that you should not cycle the motor on/off frequently.
Steve
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Mr Fixit eh wrote:

Then I think everyone is in trouble with a tablesaw, with the exception of doing many dados or box joints.
djd
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Two different animals, I think. The tablesaw is made for that but the bearings in the blower, especially the cheap HF DC I've got, and the motor, are most hurt by frequent on/off cycles. That was the consensus of most owners when I researched it. If you try to limit the number of times you turn the DC on and off, you make it last longer. That's fine with me. When it comes time I'll upgrade. Right now, I just try to deal with the fact that I can't afford top o' the line for everything and try to rig it so I can live with the extra things I have to deal with for buying the "budget" stuff.
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Dan wrote: ...

I'm having trouble visioning the actual cause of the purported early failures...
Only one I can think of offhand is cheap switch contacts, perhaps. Other modes I can think of are basically proportional to run time.
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I don't think that it has much to do with the bearings and everything to do with the size and weight of the blower impeller. The amount of effort for a TS to get it's blade up to speed is minimal and I can't speak for every table saw, but mine takes about a half a second or so to start up. My DC takes about 3 to 5 seconds to come up to speed which puts a heavy load on the motor. Remember, the impeller in a DC has many more times the mass and a HUGE increase in air resistance over that of the typical TS blade. In my old shop, many of my tools were on the same breaker and if I started the DC before the tool I was going to use, no problem but if I started it after the tool was running, about 50% of the time it would blow the breaker.
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Check a post on 6/10 called, "Ecogate DC Collector"

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Woodcraft has a remote for $50 - other probably do too. http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyidQ17

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I have a new DC from Delta and I can't get anybody to tell me if a remote will work with a mag start controller.....
Anybody ?????
I need remote control reaaaal bad.
C & M wrote:

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I don't KNOW, but think about how that mag switch works, and why it was a good idea in the first place. I can't see it working with the remotes I know about. That certainly doesn't preclude there being a smarter person out there, however.
You got the bigger Delta from mine. Mine doesn't have the mag switch. I haven't sprung for the remote yet. If I get the bigger space, then I'm gonna get an Oneida in the deal.
Patriarch
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If the mag switch works properly, I can't imagine how it would function when the remote kills the line power to the switch. That's the whole idea behind a mag switch--it won't route power to the equipment after a power outage. let us know if there's a workaround remote.
My DC is hooked to a Shop Fox remote which turns itself on any time of the day or night, every couple weeks or so. I forget to turn off the power switch on the DC to prevent it from running when I'm not there. I've had the remote kit replaced but the new one does the same thing. I'm guessing the problem is in my home electrical system because motion sensor equipped lights come on randomly, or when a light or fan is turned off in another room. Some sort of surge in the lines. And my backup battery unit beeps when I turn OFF my shop lights. Definitely something marginal in the wiring.
Dave
Pat Barber wrote:

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David wrote:

I can understand why my bandsaw and jointer come with magnetic switches but why does a dust collector need one? If the DC starts immediately after a power failure... so what?
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I would like to avoid the "auto start" version myself.
I have had several folks mention wiring a plug to the "coil" but I wonder what problems that might lead to.
Since I could not identify the "coil", there is little chance of me making "adjustments".
I want this to be "safe" and "practical"...
David wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

You'd have to wire a relay into the start coil and control it...
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The last 3 issues of Woodwork magazine have schematics and an article on this subject. I built the units and am very happy with them.
Bob Heveri

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