Automatic DC - how???

I googled it to death - and lot of people have said they have done it.
What Im trying to do is have my DC turn on when I turn any of my tools on in my shop. When I turn the tool off - have it wait 10 sec then turn off. The DC is 220. The Jointer is 220 The Tablesaw is 220 The planer, drill press, chop saw, bandsaw is 110.
I only have 2 220 plugs in the shop - all on the same circuit. I have a few 110 - all on the same circuit (just the way it was when I moved in)
Can someone give me specifics on what I would need to do it have it work the way I want it to? Hit the on switch on the TS and have the DC come on.
Thanks -Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the
I don't know either. I use a Long Ranger remote that can be clipped on to my belt.
If the wiring gets to complicated with switches and relays, consider the remote. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Like Ed said. I use a remote. Works fine. Now if I had something I could afford to open close the gates on each tool that would be primo. I know it's out there but too much for moi. Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob V wrote:

Typically it's the blast gates that are used to control the dust collector. Open the blast gate and the DC turns on, close the blast gate and it turns off. To do this for a 220 volt DC requires the use of a low voltage operated contactor with contacts rated for 220 volts with an amperage rating exceeding the draw of the DC and micro-switches for each blast gate.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

in
moved
the
I looked into the whole automated dust collection system also but decided that it was way too much work and that I would do it in steps. I decided that the best first step.was to use a remote to turn on the collector before I started each tool. I have been using the system for about six years and have found no reason to do the rest.
Good luck - Bob McBreen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
only differences between the remote and blast gate actuated is that I don't need to remember to wear the remote, I don't need to remember where the remote is and a remote plus opening the gate is 2 steps not one with the blast gate actuated.
Not a lot of difference but depending on how organised you are, it could be the deciding factor. My "micro switches" are shop made from oak and #6 screws, wiring is bell wire. the closing delay after the tool shuts off is the time it takes to make sure the tool is safe and then close the gate 10 - 30 seconds.
BRuce
Rob V wrote:

--
---

BRuce


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob V wrote:

That feature may not be as necessary as you might guess...those big DC fans take a while to spin down :) I think mine takes about 30 seconds.
--
************************************
Chris Merrill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
but during that spin down time there is little to no suction. the more you keep out of the piping, the more efficient it stays.
BRuce
Chris Merrill wrote:

--
---

BRuce


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Ecogate system is the best thing going. Google that and you will find http://www.ecogate.com DD
"It's easy when you know how..." Johnny Shines
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
too many $$ for a simple shop
David DeCristoforo wrote:

--
---

BRuce


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did exactly what you want to do, Here's how.
First off, most of my tools are 110 vac, but this really doesn't matter. For your 110 vac tools, you can get at Sears a remote switch where the tool plugs into a main out and the DC would plug into an accessory out. I made a relay box as described below. At this point you can use a 110 vac relay in the relay box. Using a DPDT relay you can make the output in the box 220 vac for the DC.
For your 220 vac tools, run them to a 220 vac relay. You won't have the added run time unless you place a capacitor across the coil for the time delay.
Mine works so well, all I do is open the blast gate and turn on the tool. The automatic switch is located at the wall where a 6=way power strip is plugged into it. I plug my tools into the power strip and hook up the dc lines. With some tools like my bandsaw, it has it's very own switch which will turn on a work light and a return line to the relay box turns on the DC.
-- Woody
Check out my Web Page at:
http://community-1.webtv.net/WoodworkerJoe/WoodworkerJoesInfo
Where you will find:
******** How My Shop Works ******** 5-21-03
* * * Build a $20 DC Separator Can Lid. 1-14-03 * * * DC Relay Box Building Plans. 1-14-03 * * * The Bad Air Your Breath Everyday.1-14-03 * * * What is a Real Woodworker? 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Definitions. 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Laws. 4-6-03 * * * What is the true meaning of life? 1-14-03 * * * Woodworker Shop Signs. 2-8-03
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There was an article a couple years ago in FWW. It showed you how to put a sensor on your power lines at the box that would switch the power line to your DC. Everything is auomatic except the blast gates. If you really want this, email me and I'll do my best to find it.
Cheers, Mike
Rob V wrote:

--
-----------------------------------------------------------
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Ignoring routers for a moment, the main users of plumbed-in dust collectors are static machines like bandsaws and shapers. As these have separate switch contactors and motors, it's easy to tap an extra way on the contactor to find a volt-free switch that you can use to drive a DC. Even if you can't get a dedicated contact, just tap the supply to the motor, downstream of the switch (but now you're wiring a mains voltage, and must be a bit more careful with it).
My router table has a switch on the table, so I can leave the awkward to reach router switch permanently on. I can tap this likewise.
My DC contactors, and the boxes they're housed in, came as scrap from some industrial rebuilding work and the rubbish skips at a friend's factory.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.