Attaching wood trim to plywood edge

I'm just starting to build a TV stand. It is oak plywood and real oak for the face frame, drawers and the top will have a 1" wide band of oak on the perimeter. My plan was to attach them with a couple of biscuits to help hold them in place and just glue and clamp. There is no stress or weight on the edges when in use.
A few weeks ago Norm was adding edge to plywood but he cut a groove in the wood and tongue in the plywood. I realize this is stronger, but is it needed in a place that just stationary? Table top, chest lid, I'd do it; but here can I pass?,
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When I built my entertainment sectional, I just glued the trim pieces to the plywood. I love Norm, but I think sometimes he makes more work for himself. I really think he needs to get rid of that pink plat shirt.

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Why not just nail them. Use the little ones with no head. I think they are called finishing nails.
Ralph Engerman R E Quick Transit
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if you route the edge then you might hit the nails. Glue is all you need and a few clamps. Then route to your hearts content.
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"R. E. Engerman" < snipped-for-privacy@snet.net> wrote in message
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thats fine but what if the edging is a sixtyforth low in a spot or two, sand it flush ? if so you are through the ply face veneer ....mjh
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if you are using 4/4 oak on 3/4 oak ply then you keep it proud on both faces, then use your flush trim bit. I do it all the time.
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"Mike Hide" < snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net> wrote in message
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good for you......mjh
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I've done it both ways. Although 1" is thicker than most edge banding I do, IME, your biscuits will serve the purpose quite well.
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Well I can't believe the carpenter has done something partially correct.
I would have used a 1/4" rebate bit [slot cutter] with a bearing on both the molding and the ply and then inserted a 1/4"spline.
Why you ask, because every thing aligns perfectly all along the joint. Changing cutters can result in joint misalignment, the biscuits work locally ,but in between possible misalignment can occur.
because of the thinness of the ply the face veneer, the surface of the molding and the ply need to be perfect so when cleaning up the joint you do not sand through.....mjh

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<snip>

I'll be doing something similar soon. Can you give more details for this newbie?
Does the 1/4" mean height of the cut? How deep does it go, or does it matter? What splines do you use - just a 1/4" wide strip you ripped on the TS? Does soft or hardwood matter for the spline? Should the spline be exactly 1/4" or slightly smaller to allow for the glue? Do you leave a gap at the back of the slot for the same reason?
Thanks, Michael
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Great, thanks. I'm going to start my project as soon as I find the "tad" mark on my ruler. ;-)
Michael
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Look between the marks for Damn, too long and Oh, S#$t Ed
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Biscuits are plenty. However, something you may or may not have considered. Veneered plywoods tend to be a bit inconsistent in thickness. While this normally does not show, wait until you put a piece hard wood up to it. You will probably see the inconsistent high and low spots on the plywood. Yes, you can sand the 2 surfaces after glue up but sometimes the veneer gets sanded away.
I make a relief cut and or tiny rabbet all the way around each plywood panel usually with the TS and about 1/16" wide by 1/16" deep. This will create a nice visual detail along with dealing with the union of plywood to hard wood.

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wrote:

Probably. When I put an edge on my shelving, I cut a rabbet in the lip to give it more strength and more glue surface. The strength is in the glue--allow more time to cure than you think (at least overnight).
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It is sitting in clamps right now. Had to get creative as I don't have any clamps longer than 36" and this is 36 1/2". I have the clamps interlocked to get extra length. No pretty, but it works. Ed
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The way I do it:
I glue a 4/4 piece of oak to the edge of the 3/4 plywood, clamping as needed. After the glue cures I use a flush trim bit in my router to flush up the 4/4 oak to the ply, will take some practice because you'll be using the router base on the edge of the wood, trim router works better here. Then clamp the piece down flat and route my profile on the strip of oak. works great and if you watch the grain you can make it almost invisible.
KY
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"Edwin Pawlowski" < snipped-for-privacy@snet.net> wrote in message
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Ron
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A few very good tips here but one thing that can bite you in the buns is not being very careful to remove excess glue if you are going to be staining your project. It can be invisible even after careful sanding, but will show up if you wipe water or laquer thinner over the joint. Best to wipe off excess right away after clamping, with a wet rag, if its white glue.
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