Attaching Skins to New Kitchen Cabinets

Hello All,
I'm putting new kitchen cabinets in my kitchen and I'm almost done with my uppers. There are four places where the "ends" are visible and the cabinet manufacturer gave me skins (around an 1/8" thick) to make the ends appear like the face frames.
My question is how do these attach? Do I just glew and clamp them at the top and bottom running a 2x4 between the clamps at the top and bottom to hold the middle or is there another way this is done?
Thanks, Eric
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It might just be a glue up, but the proper method might be quite different. Contact the manufacturer.
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wrote:

I use contact cement for that job. But make sure you're comfortable with that.
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My vote is polyurethane from a caulk tube, using cauls and clamps.
On the bottom unit at the floor I might slip in a brad if there is base around it. Same at the uppers if there is a crown molding.
Robert
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wrote:

Yup PL600 and a pin nailer would be very efficient and durable as well.
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For us, it's great. In your biz, you probably buy that stuff by the drum. For us, about a quart every couple of years unless we actually *gasp* get a little plastic laminate work.
You guys are just too much faster and too much better for the most part than we are, so I don't even consider it much anymore. I call Johnny at "AAA Best Plastics" and as he knocks out a custom kitchen so fast I am always glad I called.
For anyone worried about seeing waves in a poly application from a tube, if you see waves, you put too much on. Start with the perimeter, running a bead about 3/16" x 3/16" an inch or so in. Then fill in with lines about two inches apart over the whole skin with beads about the same size. No problems there.
BTW, I like that PL600 a lot. I used it to glue some hardened, prefinished masonite bead board up in a house. I knew that super hard face they cooked on it wouldn't look good patched. It was wainscot, so I tacked sparingly under the chair rail, and then right in the very edge.
That stuff has held perfectly around all doors, windows, fitted corners with no problems. I put that stuff up about 3 years ago using the PL600, and used that same bead board to skin under her bar and the cabinet ends using the same adhesive.
Still looks great.
Robert
Robert
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On Fri, 22 Aug 2008 21:51:20 -0400, "Eric Scantlebury"

It depends on whether the ends have a plastic photo finish on them or are real wood or raw. Almost nothing will stick to the plastic and when it does, it only holds as well as the plastic does to the cabinet. Normally we rough the hell out of the photo finish (down to whatever is under it) and glue them on with construction adhesive and a few pins while the glue dries. You don't need to remove all of the plastic, just enough to have some places where the glue will actually stick to something. If the ends are raw, wood glue will hold them fine.
Mike O.
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wrote:

I've been sanding off the finish on any joint that needs to be made - I'll continue that. I'm thinking of "roughing" the cabinet and gluing the "raw" wood skin.
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wrote:
Yup PL600 and a pin nailer would be very efficient and durable as well.

I have Lowes cheap Oak" unfinished cabinets in the place I bought. The Heimbold's ** "pins" came right through the walls of the cabinets - watch out for that!
I like the Contact cement solution and the cauls. Not sure I would "go" with squeezing adhesive out of one of those round "caulking gun" tube things. Rather an adhesive i could keep relatively even and "light" to afford the smoothest surface - no waves.
Contact cement is used to adhere Formica (plastic) to wood substrates and (the original stuff) will stick to the photo finish easy - not sure about the environmentally safe version - I don't like it.
If you can get the original and spray it on - it'll never fall off, you'll avoid all that clamping and waiting (; for the glue to dry.
Having said all that, the task is not Rocket Science and the foreseeable stresses on the application are such (thousands of eyeballs looking at it) that the job could likely be accomplished with a can of spray adhesive and a well-placed pin-nail or four & turning the cabinet up on the opposite end and stacking a few heavy tomes on the up ended surface so skinned.
**Heimbold is the name of the seller who "remodeled the place" without recourse to a list like this, text, manual, or experienced friend or neighbor. My time is spent removing his renovations and repairs and the Kitchen is awaiting such re-remodeling with the Lowes Oak Cabinets slated for the work shop. Each time we come upon another instance of his "skill set" I cry out "Its a Heimbold."
Hence, when folks come here with "stupid questions," I try to actually help them out. If not for them, then for the fellow who they sell the result to!
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wrote in message

Ok - thanks all for the responses. Think I'll clue and cawl.
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wrote:

Good luck, Eric.
Robert
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