Attach Rack to Concrete Wall.........Advice Needed


Hi folks........(there's a Gloat in this too)....Needs some advice for attaching a metal lumber rack to a poured concrete wall.
Found a pleasant surprise when I realized that a rack that was storing my wifes decorations and various nick nacks was actually a steel lumber rack. I have since removed it and will replace her storage in a bit with a nice new enclosed cabinet. (she's happy that it will be enclosed.....She's happy....I'm happy)
Anyway...(Gloat warning)..I'm getting a BUNCH of lumber from my father-in-law to put on this rack after I get it installed. Oak, walnut, poplar, and cedar. All most all of the boards are 7/8 thick, 10 feet in length and anywhere from 5 to 8 inches wide rough cut. It also has been drying for probably 15 or more years. :-) I love my dad-in-law. Really, I do.
The rack is angle steel frame with 9/16 inch holes for bolts down each post. I have five posts. Then there are arms that fit into the posts to hold the lumber......
What's the best way to install the bolts that I need to put into the concrete? I realize I'll need to drill the holes, but is a straight concrete screw the best bet or should I use some sort of "molly" in the hole and then the screw......I realize that there's going to be some serious weight on these and would prefer not to have them come crashing down.
Thanks.
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I'm guessing that you're use of the word "molly" is some sort of plug that the screw is fastened to. I'd go that route. Drill to size for a soft metal plug, hammer it in and then screw to that with the appropriate sized screws.
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<snip>

Didn't know if "molly" was a common term or not. Just what we always called them. You're right with your guess though. Usually a plastic plug that you put into a drilled hole, then put the screw into.
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You could use Tapcon (maybe it's Topcon) screws too...I used them with no problem, although for something a bit smaller. All you have to do is make sure you use the appropriate size drill bit for the size screw you would use.
You can also get devices that work similar to drywall expansion adapters. Drill the hole in concrete - insert the piece and simply screw it in to tighten it in the wall. The ones I used in this case were threaded on the outside so I could put a washer and nut on.
Keith P.
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I've used plastic plugs in concrete before, but I've always found the metal plugs to hold much better.
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wrote in message

Yes, I agree. I buy what my dad always called "lead shields" for this. Strong, and yet quite malleable.
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If it matters, 'molly' is short for 'molly bolt', and describes the gizmo that is _attached_ to /part of a bolt assembly -- designed to be used on -hollow- walls, where the assembly is placed into the hole and then 'screwed down', causing the molly assembly to flare and bind against the back side of the wall. Once the molly assembly has been bound in place, one can remove the bolt, place it through whatever one is mounting, and re-apply it into the hole. This is *notably* different from the other commonly-used form of an anchor for attaching things to hollow walls -- the device known as a 'toggle bolt'. Which is a bolt with the spring-loaded 'wings' on the end of the bolt. compress the wings, as you poke it into the hole (far enough that the wings pass entirely _through_ the hole, and 'spring out' into the open position. Then tighten it down to hold in place. However, if/when you try to remove such things, as you back the bolt out, eventually that 'wing' piece comes off the end of the bolt, and falls down inside the wall. you have to use a new one, when putting things 'back'.
The gizmos for holding a screw/bolt into a hole drilled in a _solid_ wall are called 'lead anchors'. Before the plastic ones came along, they were actually made of lead. The idea behind them being that under pressure of the screw being screwed in, the lead deforms to exactly match any irregularities in the hole, and thus 'locks' itself into place.
Note: for using lead anchors, a 'rough' hole is better than one with very smooth walls. chuck up a bit in a hammer-drill, and go to work. <grin>
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bremen68 wrote:

I'd use "Dyna Bolts"
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I've used anchors like this http://www.confast.com/products/thunderstud-anchor.asp before with good results. In fact, I used them to install a 16ft long, 8ft high lumber rack on my poured concrete walls in the basement. I like Tapcons but I wouldn't use them where serious weight is involved. Just my opinion.
Bryan
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We used to use 'Red Heads' which were 1/2 inch bolts. These were intended for foundation bolts where we missed them when pourint the walls or in slabs when something was 'moved'. they were generally used on flat surfaces and not on walls, but I think that they would work fine there as well. There are now concrete screws that work well. A cordless hammer drill, and proper bit, and the screws in whatever lengths you need. Try your local masonry supply, or even the big hardware stores. robo hippy
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wrote:

If you go this route, you can also get self-tapping screws, but they are a real PITA. Best avoided, IMO. Better to use a good masonry bit and the proper bolt- though I still think the redheads are the best fix for a lumber rack.
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The Thunderstud is the kind I was talking about :O)
Keith
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wrote:

These would be suggestion as well- These suckers have some holding power, but I'd worry about something like a plastic plug- it's my understanding that those are just for relatively lightweight items being mounted into plaster. (There are better products for drywall if you can't find a stud- it's just that old plaster chips badly without a pilot hole.) BTW, you suck- too.
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Is this thing free-standing or does the wall hold it up?
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

Mike.....It hangs on the wall.
This is a link to what it looks like......
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p2145&cat=1,43326
And in looking over the info on the page they list exactly what they recommend using for attaching to poured concrete walls....
Gotta love when that happens.
I appreciate all the info though.
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On 2 Aug 2005 10:50:42 -0700, the opaque "bremen68"

Ayup.
http://www.johnsterling.com/shelvingsystems1.htm I have the John Sterling setup and they looked identical to the Lee Valley brackets I saw listed there a while back. My longer brackets (20 or 22", I think) have a diagonal stiffeners, too. Great stuff, and about $100 for a whole wall full of it supporting a ton of wood. http://www.johnsterling.com/FMshelfbrackets1.htm
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Heart Attacks: God's revenge for eating his little animal friends -- http://www.diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development --
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Thanks for all the info........Went with Thunderstud type anchors to put the rack up last night........15 of the 1/2" X 6" critters went right in....and now.......that rack ain't goin nowhere... :-)
Wood's on the way today........Cedar in the attic......oak, poplar, and walnut on the rack......It's Christmas in August for me.
(I know quit gloating.....)
Thanks again folks!
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