Asbestos concern?

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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Okay. Thank you.
Bill
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"Bill" wrote
Thank you Ed, and everyone else to who provided me with advise in this thead! It is valuable to me now, and it will be in the future too!
By the way, if the stipple has a thin coat of paint on it does this change the way you have to go about dampening it? That is, is a spray bottle likely to go it? I presume with a bit of patience...
As far as my light fixtures, I plan to make an open ended box-shaped template of the appropriate size. I can draw pencil lines, spray through the box, clean up the openings, and paint 'em up. I'm sure it will be great fun (lol)! ;) Actually, working in such a systematic fashion will probably help me complete the job quicker. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I am not sure why you are making this complicated, like you are-and have done on other projects.
Step one- use a 3/4" roller, and paint the whole ceiling with white stain blocker paint. I suggest this step, because after I sprayed popcorn on my older house ceiling, brown stains bled through any place there was not joint compound under the paint. You will do the whole ceiling just as fast as painting only under the location of the lights as you are suggesting. The fresh white will reflect more light and be a fresh new look for your old ceiling.
Step two- put up your lights and conduit. If you are worried about the ceiling stipple breaking loose, put a little caulk on the part you are screwing to the ceiling. It will make a flat base for what you are putting up, and keep the possible asbestos from breaking free. Don't need to scrape any place, this way. Do not finish tightening the screws until the caulk dries, if it is not level enough for you when you tighten it all the way first.
I would strongly advise that you cut some 1/2" to 3/4" pieces of conduit to act as standoffs, to hold the light off the ceiling. Put the spacers up and run the screw through the light then the spacers, and the light will be much cooler, and last longer, and eliminate the possibility of the light overheating and cutting off. This will also make it easy so the light will only have a few points of contact of the spacers against the ceiling. This is an (old school) trick. You can use a pipe cutter for making spacers easy. Just don't use a pipe cutter for cutting the emt conduit, because of the sharp edge a pipe cutter will leave on the inside.
-- Jim in NC
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Morgans wrote:

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Jim,
I Was planning to paint the whole ceiling. I mentioned painting my "cutouts" above for the sake of sealing them. As you suggest, this is certainly not necessary if I'm prepared to paint the ceiling at the same time. An abundance of "stuff" makes even marking the places for the all of the lights a bit of a challenge because I have everything moved aways from ALL of the walls.
Your post contains some excellent suggestions! I've already printed it out.
BTW, I don't make things complicated on purpose. One of the lessons I learned from by mobile base project was not to make my tolerences too small: The specifications of the height of the castors did not incude their 1/8" frame, 3" bolts do not include the thickness of their heads, and even 2by4 lumber can't be depended upon to be of any size, let alone 2by8 lumber! Lesson gained! I have to give you all of the credit for teaching me about the mechanics of such mobile bases. I am pleased to tell you it came out pretty good and I will put a picture on my web page to show you after things are "tidied up".
Well, admittedly, I did complicate the mobile base project with "routing" on purpose. I wanted a "free lesson" in using my router for the first time. I received a very good lesson out of it too. I had a chance to make a few mistakes, and correct them. Many router projects wouldn't permit me a chance to re-route.
If you see me making something more complicated then I should, feel free to point it out! Thank you for your suggestions on my lighting and in general. I appreciate it!
Bill

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"Bill" wrote in message BTW, I don't make things complicated on purpose. One of the lessons I learned from by mobile base project was not to make my tolerences too small: The specifications of the height of the castors did not incude their 1/8" frame, 3" bolts do not include the thickness of their heads, and even 2by4 lumber can't be depended upon to be of any size, let alone 2by8 lumber! Lesson gained! I have to give you all of the credit for teaching me about the mechanics of such mobile bases. I am pleased to tell you it came out pretty good and I will put a picture on my web page to show you after things are "tidied up".
===== I just manufactured some wooden tubes to cover the upper part of my bricked pillars on my deck and wanted them fairly tight to avoid too much trim gap at the ends. You 47-1/2" and trim the 48" strips down to 47-3/8". Glue and the wife primed them all before we went to the beach for the day.
Got home and tried one out on pillar #1 (marked inside tube). Damn thing was 1/2" too long...I swear! Remeasured...all the same!
I am sure the wife stretched the damn thing with that paint roller of hers! Women! Who can trust 'em?
--Eric
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Morgans wrote:

Your idea impressed me even more since I sent my last message. I make spacers out of 1/2" EMT and use them to separate the fixtures from the underlying wallboard (duh)... I presume they will slice neatly through the stipple...
Now, I also understand also how you suggest to use the caulk...beautiful.
You surely saved me much time and unnecessary aggravation!
Bill

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wrote:

Jim, most pipe cutters have a reamer/deburrer attached to them so the lip can be rendered harmless. http://goo.gl/uDeux 1 pic = 1k words.

Uh, Bill. If you leave the popcorn up there and do any finishing whatsoever in your shop, you -will- get popcorn droppings in it. Murphy backs that thought 100%.
-- In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer. -- Albert Camus
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I believe you and, since you showed me just how easy it can be, I can't rule it out. I am just, unfortunately, unable to add it to this year's schedule. : (
Now, if you lived closer, I'll be we could zip through some of these tasks like they was nothin'!
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wrote:

Bill, it'll take you half a day at best, and I guarantee that if you -don't- do it before you hang those lights, it will never get done. BTDT, got the t-shirt.

I'd say "Send a plane ticket" but I don't feel like getting goosed right now.
-- In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer. -- Albert Camus
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Larry Jaques wrote:

If I was going to remove stipple, it would be in the rest of the house. If I was going to remove it from the garage, I would replace the aging drywall on the ceiling there too. Who knows.. maybe in a few years. No need, for now. I appreciate all the ideas I got on the topic this week. Not only will they help me, they will also help me be safe!
Bill
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wrote:

Warning: Once you disturb popcorn, it starts flaking worse. Being matte and bumpy, it also sucks light rather than reflecting it.
G'luck!
-- Worry is a misuse of imagination. -- Dan Zadra
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Have you tried one on EMT? Looks like it might be just the ticket.
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wrote:

Yeah, I've used any old pipe cutter, including the minis (my fave) on emt and it cuts fine.
-- In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer. -- Albert Camus
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I wasn't worried about it cutting, I wondered how well it's reamer/deburrer worked. Is that all I would need before running wire through it? No files?
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wrote:

They work well enough. Since the emt goes into connectors which protect the ends, all you have to do is debur it so it doesn't chafe the wiring, and the deburrer works well enough for that, yes.
-- Worry is a misuse of imagination. -- Dan Zadra
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Larry Jaques wrote:

That is allowable when cutting ridged conduit for electrical use. EMT is best cut with a hacksaw, then lightly reamed to remove cutting burrs. Using a reamer does not make a finish that does not cut wires. Try it, don't just read about it, jackleg.
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Morgans wrote:

I bought the pipe cutting unit linked to above yesterday. Hmmm 26.99 to cut 40 spacers--maybe I should take it back. I'll see how long it takes me to cut the EMT with a hack saw first! : )
By the way, what is a good choice of caulk that would make a good choice for the used already described? It's occured to me that it shouldn't be heat sensitive (produce dangerous fumes when warmed) or be flammable.
Larry, I had nightmares about the stipple getting in my finishing last night!! : )
Bill
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"Bill" wrote I bought the pipe cutting unit linked to above yesterday. Hmmm 26.99 to cut 40 spacers--maybe I should take it back. I'll see how long it takes me to cut the EMT with a hack saw first! : )
By the way, what is a good choice of caulk that would make a good choice for the used already described? It's occured to me that it shouldn't be heat sensitive (produce dangerous fumes when warmed) or be flammable.
Larry, I had nightmares about the stipple getting in my finishing last night!! : )
If you are not going to run wires through the spacers (which you will not be doing) it is fine to cut it with a pipe cutter. The problem cutting EMT with a pipe cutter is that it crushes it as it cuts it, leaving a sharp edge, and when you ream it, it just gets sharper. If you run wires though it, there is a very good chance that some wires will get their insulations cut, and cause a short.
-- Jim in NC
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I'd make an asbestos paste and smear it on.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I'll mix the paste as-best-os-I-can...you will think I am Chef Boyardee! : )
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Morgans wrote:

Yes, I understood that from your last post to Larry. I appreciate your pointing it out. Hack saw and a round file, huh?

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