article on hauling w short bed truck

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I saw an article in the past year or two where someone devised an adjustable keeper / hold-down for hauling sheet-goods in a less-than-8 ft. truck bed. Now I can't find the article, nor any reference to it here, or in an online article index (woodindex.com).
Anyone know another online index, or better yet, the article's origin? Thanks.
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That was on Wood magazine I think, it may could be in American Woodworkers too, since these are two magazine I read and I saw that article. Not build it though, I use a robe on my short bed. Surely it was in one of these two. take a look at http://www.woodmagazine.com/ you may find it, if no one has the correct link. Thanks Max N
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I think I remember that thing, because of the total Rube Goldberg overkill of it. <G>
If I'm hauling one or two sheets in my Toyota Tacoma, I simply put the gate up and load the sheets at an angle. For a sheet of very delicate stuff (say raw laminate), I might pick up a few 2x4's or 2'x 8' MDF shelves as I constantly need that stuff anyway. Even 1/4" MDF has proven fine loaded this way all by itself.
If I'm hauling quite a few sheets, I use 2x8's in the bed indentations to hold the sheets at wheel well height. The same web straps I keep in the truck for everything else then get attached from the trailer hitch receiver or bumper to the gate latch hooks on the sides of the bed. The straps keep everything from sliding out.
The device I'm thinking of was made of interlocking plywood members, and would take time and money to make, space to store, and time to reassemble and disassemble when needed, all to solve a non-problem.
I've hauled plenty of thin sheets, drywall, raw laminate, etc... with no damage whatsoever.
Barry
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B A R R Y wrote:

Buying a blue 2004 Tundra and dropping the gate sounds like a simpler solution ;). But yes, the nylon straps with the built-in ratcheting come-along tightener are a must for holding down up to 39 sheets of 1/2" drywall. DAMHIKT.
O'Deen - still taping/mudding in Whittier, CA
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Odeen wrote:

You didn't trade a Volkswagen Jetta with broken suspension for it, did you? <G>
I like Tundras, but the '05 Tacoma Access cab is the perfect size for me. I've got a 5x10 enclosed trailer for bigger stuff. My truck is a year old, and I'm really liking the plastic bed and standard tie-down rail system.
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Why not simply lay the tail gate down and put the panels on the floor. Works for me.
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I remember when I had a pickup...sniff, sniff, tear, tear. Had to give mine up to fit the baby's car seat in the back. I feel like such a women when I goto the Borg now. Usually try to order from the local lumberyard, they have free delivery, but that usually involves planning ahead more than 1 hour.
I agree with Barry, keep the tail up, and rest the sheets on top. Wind sheer and a nylon tie down keeps everything put.
Chuck who likes his explorer but buys a pickup the minute the youngest gets out of his car seat.
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I had the same problem, so I traded in my Ram 1500 for a Ram 1500 Quad Cab 4X4. Plenty of room for the two kids. :)
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Hey, stop showing off your truck, they guy is looking a link to the article, not what type of truck you have.
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Just pointing out that you dont have to get rid of your truck just because you have kids...
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They must have cheap gas where you are.
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$2.30 a gallon today... not too cheap. :)
the 12mpg sucks, but it's only money.
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@hotmail.com says...

$2.17 last fillup.

My Ranger 4x4 doesn't do any better in the winter (kid is grown and gone) but a little better in the summer (maybe 16 around town).
--
Keith

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But it's your only money. I just got rid of my 2.0 Probe stick shift and bought a 4.8 auto 4x4 full size GMC. Haven't had to gas it up yet...
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4.8 shouldnt be too bad... since I pull a travel trailer I went with the 5.9L. Should see my mpg when pulling the trailer. Around 5-6 mpg. :)
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wrote:

That's what club cabs are for.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Thanks All. Just narrowing it down to the correct magazine will get me there.
Mark & Juanita wrote:

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Cabela's sells this extend a truck hitch, which plugs into your receiver and provides a flat tie down surface. Go to Cabela's site and search this item number:
Extend-A-Truck Hitch Item:IG-512499
If you adjust the height to have the plywood rest on the interior wheel wells, this could work well. I've been meaning to get one myself. Mutt
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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Harbor Freight also has such a device. I have one, and I've used it a few times to haul a 24' (12' collapsed) in my short bed full size truck. It takes the extra bounce out of it, and gives another means for tying it down.
--
toolmiser


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I made something like that from leftover 3/4" oak flooring planed to 1/2" thick and laminated.
It fits into my trailer hitch and provides a flat "whale tail" about 18" behind and level with the lowered tailgate. I used to use it to carry 12-14' hardwood and 14' kayaks in a 6'3" Toyota pickup bed. The tail ends up about 10' back from the front bed wall and provides a very convenient place to strap or shrink wrap the load to the truck.
The store bought version would be very worthwhile if used a lot. I built one, because I had the flooring laying around, and knew it was a temporary solution until someone finally developed an overhead rack for the new Toyota bed. It actually worked well, taking all the bounce out of the load, and making it extremely easy to secure!
Yakima and Thule also make similar devices.
I don't use the whale tail device since I've added a Thule Xsporter rack to the truck and adapted an American van roof rack to the trailer.
Barry
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