Applying wax

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A rather simple question. I am wondering how people go about applying paste wax to already oiled pieces?
I have always simply used a rag dipped into the paste wax, rub it into the grain, wait 15min or so and buff with a clean rag. It works great, but sometimes it seems to me like there might be a better way. I also recall reading someone mention using 0000 Steel wool for applying wax, and was wondering about the pros of that approach.
Alright, thanks for any advice and hope this isn't too simple of a question
Andrew
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On 11 Jul 2005 16:54:08 -0700, "Tattooed and Dusty"

I have used 0000 steel wool for years like this. It does give a soft sheen to the wood finish that most find appealing. You do get a few little "hairs" of the steel wool stuck in corners and edges, so go over it with a soft rag afterwards. If that fails, I also use an old magnetron magnet (wrapped in a soft cloth) to "suck out" these little bits.
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0000 and wax imparts a fine scratch pattern to the finish, yielding, hopefully, a soft satin low gloss finish, with a velvety touch.
I use synthetic pads, for the reason that I have some, and have often used oak in my projects. Steel wool and oak offer potential problems...
But recycled terry towels, t-shirts, and well washed old cloth baby diapers also are favorites.
Patriarch
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Patriarch, As always thanks for the comments. Makes sense, maybe I will try the steel wool on this project
A
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You're welcome.
Patriarch
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Back in my lurking days I gave 0000 and the synthetic version a try based on Patriarch's recommendations and can heartily say it is worth a go!
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Just to be clear, this method predates ME by a very, very long time.
Patriarch, puzzling the wisdom of the ancients daily...
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RE: Subject
Several folks have suggested using steel wool.
SFWIW, since steel rusts, if you don't get rid of 110% of the residue, you have a problem.
I use either bronze wool or any of a number of 3M pads as an alternate to steel wool.
Lew
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On Tue, 12 Jul 2005 22:47:56 GMT, the opaque Lew Hodgett

I picked up a box of 20 gray (ultra fine) ScotchBrite pads from Enco for $12 last month when they were on sale. Those and a box of maroon (fine) 7447s I bought last year ought to last me awhile.
505-6134 7448 6X9 LIGHT GREY 3M SCOTCH-BRITE PADS 20 $.59 $11.80
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How so? (grain related? or chemical related?)
Curiously,
JT
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On Tue, 12 Jul 2005 15:04:04 +0000 (UTC), the opaque John Thomas

Steel wool remnants + moisture = rust/black stains on the oak.
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Ok, that makes sense .. but why oak moreso than other woods?
Being dense today, JT
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John Thomas wrote:

High concentration of tannic acid...
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On Tue, 12 Jul 2005 17:06:34 +0000 (UTC), the opaque John Thomas

It may be the density of tannic acid in oaks, but don't quote me on it. SWAG.
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Chemical. Tannin and steel don't get along. Add a bit of damp, and you get black spots - ferric (?) tannate.
For that matter, why steel wool? Dreadful stuff that gets dust everywhere. If you want to scratch a surface, use 400 SiC. Or use satin varnish.
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To remove the dust nibs in your satin varnish. I find a finish to be much more "Touchable" after wax/wool. Although I have never tried it, I suspect SiC would not hold the was as well.
If I were just applying a wax on raw wood, I would just use a cloth.
-Steve
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George,
Thanks -- between your post and Larry's -- I got it.
Regards,
JT
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Steel+oak=black stains. Guess how I know.

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CW wrote:

Requires moisture, too...
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I live in Seattle.

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