Anywhere in Boston area to get hardwood jointed for glue-ups?

I would like to build an oak table-top using glue ups.
I don't have a jointer (neither space, nor budget, nor enough use to justify) and was wondering if there is a source of hardwood in the Boston area (preferably near Western suburb) that will joint the edges of hardwood.
Alternatively, is there any shop that will joint a few pieces for me that I bring in if I'm willing to pay for it.
Thanks
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Hey Blueman, Just a thought, but have considered jointing on a table saw or a router table? I don't have the descriptions in front of me but I think you could google them from this group to get a few good references. I think the latest issue of ShopNotes has an article on the table saw way to do this.
Marc (from Maryland- too far to help you)

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Thanks - yes, I have considered both methods. My concern though is that the "innacuracies" in my table saw (15 year old mid-level Craftsman) and my router table (good router but cheapo table) will make these methods less than perfect...
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writes:

FWIW, take the time to set up that Craftsman for proper blade alignment, put a new blade on it, and make sure your fence locks down securely and it will joint an edge ready for glue up. You don't need an expensive saw to do things, you just need the saw to be set up well. Even an expensive saw, if not properly set up will yield bad cuts. Take the time to set the saw up and it will reward you in far greater ways than just this immediate need.
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writes:

One way of doing this with your router is clamp the boards down on a flat surface with the two edges to be jointed about 1/8" apart. Then clamp a straightedge such that a 1/4" straight bit in your router will run down the middle of the boards. As you make the cut, it will take material off both boards at the same time. If you happen to waver slightly in your line, you will mirror the mistake on both sides.
Alternately, you can joint each board separately with a router and straightedge. This link shows one way. http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id362
Then, our course, there's always a jointing plane.
todd
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Try New England Hardwood in Littleton. I suspect they'd rather sell you the wood, they used to do a lot of custom work though. Nice folks.
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I second New England Hardwood, I dealt with them 20? years ago; they are good guys. You may want to learn how to hand plane those edges though. It will amaze you how easy it is if both pieces are planed at the same time...both mating edges joined at the same time. Because it is best to have the long dimension of the joint a little convex, hand planing is necessary even after machine joining. Additionally, the jointer leaves a series of scallops whereas a properly planed edge is smooth as a smelt. Why convex? To keep the ends of the joint from opening. After joining the pieces (glue up) you will have to plane the surface because it is impossible to get glued pieces to align perfectly. Learn how to use the plane....it will give you a lifetime of enjoyment. I took several woodworking courses at North Bennet Street School, in the North End, and learned more in a few weeks that I had taught myself in decades of woodworking. Dave

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