Anything wrong with apple?

I never hear of anyone making something from apple wood. Is there a reason for this? Or does the general term "fruit wood" include apple? I have a friend chopping down a large apple tree (don't know species) and he's offered it to me. (More out of aversion to hauling it to the dump than a desire to do me a favor, I'm sure.) Once the logs are roughly planked and seasoned I'd have thought they could be useful. But I defer to those who know.
FoggyTown
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I have an antique table made from Apple wood, looks good and seems to have done well for the past 150+ years. I have done some turning with Apple wood and found it nice to work with but hard to get.

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wrote:

The problem with apple is that it is usually in rather small pieces and that there is a lot of stress in the wood because of pruning, etc. However, it is beautiful wood.
Ed
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GRAB it all. What you can't use, you can sell. Saw it into boards, sticker it, let it sit for most of a year in a dry protected place. The stuff is beautifull to work with. Like another post says, it's hard to get in any length or width.
Pete
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The reason it is hard to get in long lengths is because all apple trees are planted in orchards not forests for lumber. Orchard owners want the trees with short trunks to allow easy picking, pruning and spraying. Also many orchards are now planted with dwarf and/or semi-dwarf types which make trunks even shorter.
Apple wood is a very good wood for many uses. It makes great smoke for smoking meat, as well as good looking furniture. Grab any you can get hold of.

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snipped-for-privacy@mts.net writes:

make sure you wax the ends before stickering to prevent excessive checking.
scott
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Mon, May 21, 2007, 4:27am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (FoggyTown) doth mumble: I never hear of anyone making something from apple wood. Is there a reason for this? Or does the general term "fruit wood" include apple? I have a friend chopping down a large apple tree (don't know species) and he's offered it to me. (More out of aversion to hauling it to the dump than a desire to do me a favor, I'm sure.) Once the logs are roughly planked and seasoned I'd have thought they could be useful. But I defer to those who know.
Sheesh. Back to basics again. 1. It's wood. It's free. That means it's FREE WOOD (You can skip to 2 if the term "free wood" doesn't sink in.). Tell the nice man you'll be happy to do him a favor, take the wood, run away it very real fast, ask questions later - "after" the wood is well hidden. 2. If you don't want it, send it to me, and it'll count as a sacrifice from you to the Woodworking Gods. Trust me, they'll give you an attaboy for it. 3. Yes, it's a fruit wood, it's apple. Long history of use. Like has been said, there's not a lot out tere, you usualy don't get large pieces, it often tends to twist while drying. Read 4. 4. A bit of googling should give you a lot more. 5. Re-read 2. Repeat as necessary.
JOAT What is life without challenge and a constant stream of new humiliations? - Peter Egan
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I've made lots of things with apple wood. Ribs, chickens, pork loins, Canadian bacon are all good smoked with apple wood. The smaller pieces that you can't use for wood, and the sawdust itself, have value to people that smoke foods.
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