anyone work for Lowe's or Home Depot?

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Hi,
I am considering trying to get on a night stocking crew with Lowe's or Home Depot. I like working at night and being off during the day, and at the moment Lowe's seems best for me if the hours really are from 4:00AM-1:00PM. Can anyone tell me about what it pays, how they compare with Home Depot, or anything else you think should be taken into consideration? Maybe there are places that would be better to try to work? Can anyone suggest a better place to inquire about such things? I know about their websites, but want to learn about the things they don't tell you there as well as the things they do.
Thanks for any info or suggestions! David
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im going to tell you a short story that taught me a valuable lesson.
i wanted to get out of the high stress business of emergency computer support and went to a future shop thinking i could get a job there no problem. i ended up talking with the owner of the company. after spending 15 minutes talking about what i knew about electronics and computers, he told me the one thing i will never forget.
he told me he didnt give a rats ass what i knew about computers or electronics. he wanted to know what i knew about SELLING computers and electronics.
expect the same at lowes or home depot.
randy

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randy writes:

True. But what most retail management manages (sorry about that) to overlook is the fact that knowing about something makes selling it easier, supporting it much easier, and finding out what the customer needs even easier. Result: more sales and better sales support, which eventually results in even more sales. It is the "eventually" that seems to baffle today's managers, "Ya mean, not this week (month or month for the real long term planners)? Feggedaboutit. We can't afford to wait."
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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Charlie ...
<<True. But what most retail management manages (sorry about that) to overlook is the fact that knowing about something makes selling it easier, supporting it much easier, and finding out what the customer needs even easier. >>
Well, yes and no. If you know a lot about what you are selling, and what you are selling is crap (and if you happen to have some scruples), that combination of circumstances can actually hinder the process. Perhaps that's why so many of the folks in those orange or blue aprons are as clueless as they seem. If they really knew about some of those the products on the shelves, when you asked them where to find something they might point you in the direction of the exit.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"



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"xrongor"

I'm not sure what your point is or how the heck you came to want to post what you did based on the question other than a sharp paternal need to offer trivial career advice. I'm pretty sure anyone capable of posting to Usenet can probably figure out how to stock a shelf.
To actually answer the question, I've never heard an employee complain about their job at Home Depot when I talk to them (seems like too often...). My tenent's boyfriend works there as well and seems happy and well paid for what he does. Lowe's, OTOH, doesn't seem to have the same faces around as long as Home Depot - at least at the ones near me. Just my somewhat uninterested and passive observations, though. Maybe apply to both and see what you find out for yourself.
- Nate
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snipped-for-privacy@aci.on.ca says...

You speak of that which you know not.
Many of the people at HD (can't speak to Lowes specifically, but they would have to be market competitive to survive) are former tradesmen who are reasonably compensated for their knowledge of the trades.
I've personally spoken to two at a local HD (U.S.) that were willing to disclose their wage. One had retired from his trade, the other was moonlighting. The first was earning $16/hour, the second $13 (he was part time evenings, the easiest shift to staff for these stores).
That's a far cry from minimum wage.
--
Mark

The truth as I perceive it to be.
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Mark responds:

Some of the clerks may be at minimum, but I don't think many are. And those with woodworking or contracting experience tend to do better. Know a guy in Virginia who had retired as a contractor, moved to VA, built his house, his daughter's house, was bored spitless. HD opened up and he got a job doing demonstrations. 18 bucks an hour for about all the hours he wanted the work. He didn't really need the money, but he had gone through hydorponic gardening (commercially, small scale) and a couple other hobbies, so decided to keep busy.
Not exactly minimum wage. Not what he made as a contractor, either, but certainly better than $5.15. an hour.
Now, Walmart does pay that kind of low end bucks. Do we complain about the help there?
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme says...

Walmart has help? :-)

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote in message > Not exactly minimum wage. Not what he made as a contractor, either, but

Actually my wife was recently looking for a part time job, and Walmart paid about $1 more an hour than anywhere else. About $2 more than target and penneys...
-she passed on the walmart job anyway....
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That hourly rate, even *IF* it is fulltime, sounds so much more impressive than $35K a year. As I said in another post, if everyone discussed *dollars* *per* *year*, we could compare salaries/wages a lot more simply especially since a lot of jobs deliberately keep workers well under the forty limit to avoid having to provide benefits.
Gerry
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GERRY responds:

I don't think it makes a whole lot of difference. There's not a lot of effort involved in converting hourly wages to annual (multiply by 2080 for a full week every week), but, as you note, there may not be much point. I don't know how many hours Marvin worked or works, but it wasn't full time, nor did he wish to work full time. Setting him up as earning 35K per year would have been a lie. It is far easier for most hourly wage jobs to provide the hourly rate than it is to extrapolate because of the variable hours. I've got another friend who makes about $16 an hour, but almost never drags down less than 50K a year. He puts the time in, does the work, and makes pretty decent money. How do I specifiy his salary? Well, I say he makes 16 bucks an hour, except when he's making 24.
At the start of the year, neither he nor his boss has any idea of how many time and a half hours he'll get, so specifying his earnings at 55K is not correct. He may only make 45, but is more likely to tap 60, sometimes a touch more.
The only time a company has to keep workers under xx hours to avoid providing benefits is when they provide benefits for those working a full week (which the company may designate as 35, 37-1/2 or 40 hours a week). If no one is paid benefits, there is no need to worry about hours. Admittedly, this tends to be the case in small companies. I've seen a lot of it with small contractors and builders. An extra buck or two an hour is supposed to make up for the lack of benefits.
It doesn't work if you check out health care costs today, which have reached thelevel of criminal (and not all of it is the fault of the insurance companies by any stretch).
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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Up here, the auto insurers continue to cry the blues and raise rates by leaps and bounds. A few weeks ago however, the newspapers announced that the insurance companies' profits were up over *800%* /in/ /one/ /year/. They are among the biggest, most obscene bandits in our economy.
Gerry
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Gerry writes:

Not just there. 60 Minutes, I think, looked over some malpractice insurance costs. Seems the companies are making plenty of money, not losing as they say, but are raising rates at a tremendous pace...reason: they screwed up with their investments, which lost as massive percentage in the past few years, so now they're gobbling it all back at once. You can bet your ever-lovin' that they won't lower rates at the end.
But it still isn't all the insurance companies fault. First, government lets them get away with thieving, and so do we when we don't storm our legislators' offices and demand reform. Next up, tort lawyers go for the wallet every time, even in cases where a deep into the change purse is more sensible. Juries too often go along.
Systemic, instead of being the fault of one type of company or person.
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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Have you compared insurance company profits by year from 2000 to 2003?
I'll bet the total dollars of profit compared between 2000 and 2003 isn't much different. Insurers made little profit in 2001/2002. An 800% increase could be because they are now back to normal.
I don't like the rate of insurance increases any more than anyone else. My insurance rate actually barely increased at my last renewal in December.
Brian Elfert
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No, the profits were an all-time record. Insurance=theft a lot of the time, IMNSHO.
Mike
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With NO tickets or accidents, my two commercial vehicle policies increased 25% two weeks before the 800% announcement. And I had to pay the usual $150 brokerage fee as well on top of the new premiums. They are gouging thieves.
Gerry
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On Mon, 05 Apr 2004 16:24:30 -0400, "G.E.R.R.Y."

Not everybody works for the money and/or benefits.
And even THOSE folks are often happy.
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
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On 03 Apr 2004 23:11:44 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

And do we have the right?
As we get older and wiser, we often find that there's more important aspects to a job than wages.
You can often tell a good employer by the attitude and friendliness of its employees. I've always gotten good vibes from Wal-Mart and Home Depot.
Have a nice week...
Trent
What do you call a smart blonde? A golden retriever.
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On 03 Apr 2004 23:11:44 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

I always thought it was funny that for all the people who complain about how little Walmart pays, Walmart always has a long line of people who are dying to work there.
Walmart doesn't pretend to pay big bucks. Why pretend that they do?
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Brian Henderson writes:

Huh? I see no pretense anywhere about Walmart paying big bucks. Unless things have changed, the Bedford, VA store, where some people I know work, start everyone at $5.30 an hour. I think that's just to be able to say they're paying above minimum wage. I don't know if that's chain policy, but it seems likely.
That long line of people is essential, as the turnover is enormous. But I've heard it's a pretty good place for retirees who need a few extra bucks to work. It gets them out and involved and brings in some money to supplement SS.
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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