Anyone that has the Beadlock loose tenon jig: What do you think about it?

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Yes, Darin, you DO understand the nature of my question about what width boards it will work on. The two detailed descriptions of it's operation on the 'net were provided for me, which I read in total. The explanations tend to focus on a 3/8 and 1/2 bead for 1/2 and 3/4 material, so naturally I had wondered if it would work like with a biscuit cutter whereby you could insert a slot into the face of an infinitely wide board, if desired. I now understand that with longer bolts, that's doable. At least two users report slippage during drilling. Must the fixture be tightened unduly tight to prevent movement?
dave
Darin Lawrence wrote:

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If it slips, it's cause You didn't clamp it down. The jig requires clamping by the operator.
With a minor modification, it can be place ANYWHERE on a board.
Bay Area Dave wrote:

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--------- It must be well clamped. Stuffing it in a vice would do. I wouldn't call the clamping pressure 'undue', simply adequate to stop the jig moving when the drill bit tries to wander off down one of the already drilled holes.
I bought a smallish ratchet clamp last night that should work fine. I'll try it out when my new tenons arrive.
Even if the new tenons are still a tight fit I do not intend to give up on this contraption. If I have to I will have the thing drilled out to 10mm for the 3/8" block and 13mm for the 1/2" block, but first I will give the supplier the opportunity to fix it by making the tenons a smidgen smaller.
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thanks for the update.
dave
gandalf wrote:

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I found a couple of things make the beadlock work better. I added lock washers to the tighening bolts. Held the jig tight and kept the drilling block from moving. I also run the drill in and out a few times. which helps keep the tenon material from getting too tight. I used mine to put together a porch full of screens for a friend. Also, if you have a router table, buy the cutter to make your own tenon material.
snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com says...

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You've gotten a ton of responses so far. I bought it early on to avoid learning to make "real" M&T joints. My experiences have been more aligned w/ Gandalf: easy to bugger up the mortise, since the jig often slipped drilling the "B" holes. [ Switching to Bessey's and cranking them down has helped. ] And, the last few dry fits were way too tight. (Don't recall that being the case when I first used the jig.) I ended up shaving some edges on the bandsaw to ease the fit.
Would I buy it again? Nope. Will I continue to use the one I have? Maybe. Rarely. Time to master (a) M&T's and (b) making my own loose tenon stock.
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Yes, i have it. It works great. I haven't made a regular M&T joint since I got it. It's not set up as is to do angles but a little creativity will fix that. Yes, I would buy it again.

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