Anyone out there w/ a 20" planer?

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Im in the market for a new 20" planer. Right now Im looking at the Jet JWP-208 - 3HP 20" . I can get it for about 1350.00 w/ shipping Looking at some comparisons - the grizzly G1033 is about 1450.00 w/ shipping. The Powermatic 208 is 1600.00 w/shipping - but as far as I can tell - its the same as the jet but a different color.
Im also looking at the 5HP shopfox which is about 1,745.00 w/ shipping. But thats a bit on the highside of what I want to spend.
Just curious if anyone has any of the above and can give me some + or - on them.
Thanks Rob
You can reply to me at r_b_v at v_e_r_z_e_r_a doht c_o_m
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I have the Jet 20" planer and have had no problems with it..
The only issue I would have, and it's a small one, is that you must keep the bed waxed to prevent binding.. If you don't keep the bed waxed the feed rollers need to be cranked down too far resulting in "roller tracks" in you finished surface..
All in all a very nice addition to my shop
Joe in Indiana

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I don`t have experience with the machines you mention. But i use from time to time a 12" 4HP planer from Robland. Planing 12" boards can use that power. I`d guess a 20" planer would need something like 6 to 7 HP to be able to work in a comfortable (take more of in one run than sanding it ;-) ) way.
Wouter

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Rob, I have the Grizzley 20" G1033. When I first got it, I found it difficult to work with as far as the feed jamming the wood going through it. I called Grizzly tech support, who sent me a fax on a fine tuning of the machine. After I recalibrated it, it works beautifully. I am running quartersawn white oak, cherry and maple through it, and it's working fine right now. I have planed to as thin as 1/4" with it. I have not had any snipe problems. It's a pleasure to work with, nice and heavy, and the tech support has been very good. I recommend it highly. Matt
Rob V wrote:

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"Rob V"

Tried toolseeker.com?
Seems http://tool-corral.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/page84.html has this unit for $1299 - though maybe they gouge you on shipping...
Still wondering what I can't do with a 13" planer and a 22-44 drum sander...
- Nate
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I have had the G1033 for a couple of years now. One comment, Grizzly seems to put this one on sale a couple of times a year for a hundred or so off, you might want to wait for their summer sale.
It worked great out of the box, no complaints at all. I don't really see why you'd need more power, either. This thing is plenty strong at 3HP. Make sure you've got the DC to handle it.
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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"If" I had a grand (plus) and "if" I was in Florida (Lake Wales) I'd be all over this.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item%90640936
The feed speed can be varied between 20, 40 and 80 FPM. Has a four knife cutter head. Will take a 3/8" cut in one pass. It weighs in at about 1500 lbs.
This ain't no Mommy's Boy Chiwanese (built by little children and political prisoners) 20" planer.
This planer originally sold for about $1000 (w/o motor) in 1960. I'll let you play with the inflation calculator to determine it's worth (new) today. In the grand scheme of things wooddorking and vintage, getting a machine like this for the same price it sold for back in the 50's/60's is enough to allow you drop your shorts down around your ankles and wag yourself at passers by.
The seller (Jim Barber/Barbers Machinery) is someone known to some of the members of the Old WoodWorking Machines (OWWM) forum and to the best of my recollection he's trustable.
Just say (tmPL), "If" I had a grand (plus) and "if" I was in Florida (Lake Wales) I'd be all over this.
sigh...
UA100
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Id love to get this - the problem is the shipping would kill me!

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Rob V wrote:

Then again, this time of the year, an "out 'n back" to Flow-reeda...
sigh...
UA100
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;) That would be great fun w/ 3 kids in tow...lol

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wrote:

The Grizzly planer isn't made in China, it's made in Taiwan. I know you like American made stuff, great, so do I, but you are kidding yourself if you think Taiwanese stuff is made by children and political prisoners. Taiwanese stuff is good, and it's good because their people basically work their asses off. They are among the best and most efficient capitalists on Earth.
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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While I'll agree that the current crop of Taiwanese machinery is better than the Chinese crap it may only be because they have been at it a little longer. I can remember working for a machinery dealer who sold one of the first Taiwanese made 6x48 belt sanders that were imported under the Wilton Machinery brand name. It was for the most part a knock-off of the Delta machine. Upon delivery to the customer it was discovered that no amount of adjustment would make the sanding belt track properly. The problem? The "engineers" in Taiwan had neglected to copy the crown of the belt pulleys on the Delta. The belt would always try to ride off one side or the other on the perfectly straight sided wheels. Once the pulley situation was corrected the machine was put into service and the casting holding the work table broke in short order. The customer had had enough and returned the machine for replacement with a Rockwell, who manufactured what we would now call Delta at that time. But that's a whole 'nother story.
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Tim Carver wrote:

I'll concede you this one but what will it look like after the 'Murican shipper is done with it?
UA100
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wrote:

This is a really interesting question, because Grizzly uses major truck lines just like everybody else, at least in Portland. I've seen enough reports to believe people are having lots of shipping problems. I suppose that it must just be the case that the Delta and Jet distributors are just dealing with the breakage themselves and the customer never sees it. Or perhaps they're ordering by the truckload and there's something different about the way the stuff gets handled when the whole truck is heavy machinery going to one place?
In my case, I have always made the drive to Bellingham with my trusty utility trailer whenever I wanted to buy something major from Grizzly.
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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Tim Carver wrote:

By the way Tim, I've never been on the "Buy 'Murican" band wagon. I actually hate these flag wavers. The bandwagon I have been on is the "buy the older and better built machinery". It just so happens and is a matter of fact that most of what is available in the "older and better built" class of machines just happens to be 'Murican.
I would not have a problem buying something foreign. It wouldn't even need to be older, just better built. Oh, and at less than (way less than) retail hence the old. I guess you could say I'm a re-cycler.
UA100
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wrote:

It sounds as if you're saying that you're looking first for good value for your money, which is hard to argue with. Clearly, a lot of older American stuff is a great value today. However, I believe that most of the reason that for the higher quality of the older American stuff is that after adjusting for inflation, the equipment was much more expensive when new than what's available today. Contrary to what a lot of people think, the prices of heavy woodworking machinery have been trending downward for many years, especially after inflation but in many cases even in absolute dollars. Take your Parks planer for example - you say it sold originally for $1000 in 1960. That's probably $10,000 or so today! So is it fair to say it's "better built" than what's available today? Yes in an absolute sense, but certainly not in the sense of price/performance when the machines were new. Many of these machines were simply not even an option for the home shop back in the days when they were made, due to their original cost.
This trend works in your favor as a collector of old iron, because the market tends to value used machines as some fraction of the cost of a new replacement, even if the new replacement isn't as well made.
I've always taken the route of being new stuff, but I try to be extremely careful of what I buy and how much I pay for it. The planer the OP asked about (Grizzly G1033) about is a good example. It weighs 750 lbs, and even though I'm in no sense an expert, I think it's a great machine. That thing is a workhorse, and IIRC, I paid $1100 for it on sale. That would be equivalent to $100 or so back in 1960.
As you've probably guessed, I've never bought an old woodworking machine - but I'm willing to do it, if the value proposition looks right to me. I'd love to have an old, high quality RAS, but ufortunately, my shop is too full of iron already!
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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Tim Carver wrote:

That would be fair and I also agree with what another poster brought up in a thread on the amount of work there seems to be after buying what was supposed to be a new machine (it comes in kit form) ready to use. I figure if I have to work on it anyway I might as well not pay as much for it.

See now you're getting into voodoo and mumbo-jumbo. I keep ekinomiks up their with religion and politics when it comes to having a civil discussion.

Not to cut you off with that thought but I'm a firm believer that it's all about Norm. Don't worry, I'm not one of those guys whose having his teeth screwed with on purpose so he can look just like Norm. What I've been watching these last three decades is the growth in hobbyist wooddorking. Before Norm (BN) it was awful dismal to say the least. After Norm (AN) it's what you see today. Pretty much in a nut shell you can go to all of the tool and machine makers and look at their Spiky Charts and pretty much SWAG a moment in time when Norm first started being watched by the public. "That" is what drives down the cost of wooddorking tools and machinery.

Okee-dokee.
I've totally missed your point here. Are you apologizing for manufacturers because they've driven the price down with value engineering and cheaper castings?

And don't forget, somebody else got to rub off the shiney which a lot of people just don't understand.

And Grandpa bought a Ford for $350.

All you have to do is start looking.
UA100
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wrote:

I ain't perzactly shur but this might be in the aria of political scientology.
Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker (ret) Real Email is: tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet Website: http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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brought forth from the murky depths:

Political scientology sings to you, does it, Tawm?
------------------------------------------------------ I survived the D.C. Blizzard of 2000...from California. ---------------------------- http://www.diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development --------------------------------------------------
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wrote:

that Norm has had an impact, and I'll grant that equipment started getting more affordable at about the time Norm came on the scene. I'm not sure, however, whether the growth of the hobby (and Norm's popularity) caused the availability of affordable machinery, or whether the hobby has grown because the machinery became affordable, with Norm's popularity coming as a result of the growth of the hobby. Perhaps a bit of both. Regardless, the machinery has relentessly gotten cheaper (in inflation-adjusted terms) during that period.

a bad thing that a hobbyist can now buy a new 20" stationary planer for a tiny fraction of his/her salary when that tool would have cost a major chunk of a years salary a few decades ago. When that Parks planer sold for $1000, $8000 per year was a really good yearly salary. A new planer today is a much more affordable proposition than it was in 1960. It doesn't seem unreasonable to me that this greater affordability for the masses has come along with some quality reduction.

something big. Then I could start looking :-)
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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