Anyone notice a difference in "sharpness"...


Is this a known thing? I haven't encountered it in anything I've read to this point.
When the last surface honed is the trailing surface of the blade, for example, the plane blade back on a bevel-up low-angle plane, and the bevel on a conventional smoothing plane blade, acts noticeably sharper.
I'm using a 8000x stone as the final grit. Could be a final "burnishment" of the edge, resulting in a slight upturn?
er
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That's why the back flattening of bevel-up blades and chisels must be perfectly done. I know I could be wrong about your problem, but look at the back with light reflecting off it, do the light rays concentrate when moving toward the cutting edge? If so, there's a micro-round-off there... and if so, you don't want that on either type of blade. With a bevel down blade it's not as important.
Like I said, I know I could be wrong in my interpretation of what you wrote. Also, if it's an A2 blade, simply harder to sharpen, and it can't get as sharp as HCS, of which by Hock tools is quite superior. Very fine grained steel and RC 62.
Anyone is invited to correct me, if I am wrong.
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AAvK wrote:

The one I'm looking at is a new stanley blade. I touched it up (having used it) to do your test, and I do see a little bending near the edge. Odd, since I used a pristine side of the stone.
Okay, I checked my own blade (O-1 Starrett) and that doesn't do it at all. It's also sharper--I haven't used it since I last sharpened it (had to rub off some paste wax)--a lot sharper. It doesn't show any difference in sharpness from one side to the other either (and I have the bare patches to prove it. :)
Maybe The Stanley metal is just crap. Maybe I need to back up and redo the back...

This should be fun. I ordered the A2 blades. I'll see how they compare to Stanley's, and mine.
er
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The Norton water stone? Possibly too soft. Best for back flattening must be as hard as possible, glass and abrasive paper, Japanese kanaban and grit powder, Norton india oil stone and Arkansas natural oil stones. The glass and abrasive paper is the worst of all the above methods simply because of the softness of the paper, or it takes a lot of 'concentrating on keeping it flat' just to get it right. The Norton waterstone is a veritable PEZ candy compared to an oil stone, or a steel Kanaban. http://japanwoodworker.com /

Yes it is, but with my above mentioned methods it is still doable, then useable. I have two Stanley #4 type 19 planes both with original cutters, these were last made in 1961 (I was born in '64), these blades are definitely worse than Hock HCS, the edge wears down sooner. But they work.

The A2 holds the same edge for a long time, longer than Hock's HCS, I still kinda think it's a bit "bunky".

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AAvK wrote:

I'm skeptical, if only because I've read the soft stones are suited to very hard steel blades, and because with my own blade I'm able to reach the glides-through-hair-without-resistance sharp using waterstones.
Also, since you say you are using green compound on a strop--I think you'll get the same results following up a waterstone with chromium oxide. I haven't been doing that, but I'm getting good results with a hard blade (I didn't bother tempering since the blade is so very thick) and water stones with no green compound.
Now, if I had oilstones, I could make a real test instead of mere protest. :)
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No, you're cutting a pathway into the soft stone, causing the micro-round on the back of that Stanley blade as you push it. Too easy with that blade.

The strop is mainly for touch ups. I mentioned, all one needs is a soft Arkansas and leather for both jobs adding up to a complete job, but going lightly on the back for light polishing and removing burs by 'dragging flat' on the leather. so to speak.
The thing about "gliding through hair" is possible this way.
That blade as un-tempered is still thin at the bevel and cutting edge where it can crack, temper it back in your oven, like 300 F for an hour or less. Fully pre-heat first, with your tray or rack along with it.

Good deals: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p3018&cat=1,43072 Just look at those grits! http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQfgtpZ1QQfrppZ50QQsassZjpfarm4 A nice honest seller.

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an A2 blade, simply harder to sharpen, and it can't get as sharp as HCS, of which by Hock tools is quite superior. Very fine grained steel and RC 62.
You're absolutely right. And for the final edge, I use a leather strop charged with Diamontine or Rouge. That's 'scary' sharp. Bugs
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