Anyone have experience with these California Air Tools compressors

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I'm looking for a small stationary compressor for my small garage/shop. These don't look too bad, but haven't seen any reviews. The 2hp looks pretty good for my applications. Fairly quiet. Any experience?
http://woodworker.com/california-air-compressor-1hp-46-gal-alum-tank-mssu-165-470.asp?utm_source=promo&utm_medium=email&utm_content 5470&utm_campaign=IRW52H
Thanks, Tom
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That looks like another practically useless website.. maybe they insist in accepting their cookies or some other BS. I couldn't get it to show/list any air compressors.
Apparently, these commerce morons will never understand/realize the importance of allowing potential customers to see their merchandise and prices.
--
WB
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08.dc1.easynews.com:

there's something misconfigured on your system.
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That is an old and trusted web site, I'm not having any problems.
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Weird, seems tobe working fine now.. and nothing's changes as far as the computer.
The specs indicate it's imported, not likely a good sign.
Piston pumps are generally better than diaphram pumps. I have some oil-less piston pumps that haven't been used much since I've had 'em but they were used when I got 'em, and they still perform well any time I need them. They're 1/4 or 1/3 HP and have a single cylinder on one end with maybe a 2" piston (or slightly larger). The valves are reed types and the rings are a slippery synthetic material.. the upper ring being a wide band rabbet-notched at the gap and the lower being a width more comparable to a cast iron ring. Similar units were sold under the brand Thomas (one is Pneumotive). The one unit was presumably used a lot.. the centrifugal weight assembly was badly worn but a local motor shop had a replacement.
The smaller capacity California unit doesn't have much air delivery, and would be problematic with many air tools, but might be OK for a brad nailer or stapler. The 2HP unit has better secs for $400+ but specs are commonly exaggerated.
For a 1/2" impact wrench, most sanders and other common shop air tools, the 2HP unit may be barely adequate. A larger displacement belt-driven air compressor would better serve future tool expansion and also last longer.. maybe $100-200 more, approx $600 range although some deals may be available in the $400-500 range.
The aluminum tanks aren't a valuable feature, IMO.. they're probably only slightly lighter than steel (if lighter), and steel tanks will typically last for decades if kept properly drained.
Without pics of the motor and pumps, they aren't revealing much.
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WB
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http://woodworker.com/california-air-compressor-1hp-46-gal-alum-tank-mssu-165-470.asp?utm_source=promo&utm_medium=email&utm_content 5470&utm_campaign=IRW52H

I have not heard of that brand but it seems that everyone is putting their name on a compressor built by some one else these days. I assume you have actually heard it run and are OK with the noise it puts out and are not simply trusting the ultra quiet description. Next thing you should consider is if it will have the CFM that you will need. Compressors this size are typically good for nail guns, air nozzles, and filling tires.
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Looks like the Steele unit sold at Lowes. Except the Lowes rig is half that price.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_447171-48533-SP-CE355TM_4294795218__?productIdF46161&Ns=p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1
--
Steve W.

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tdacon wrote:

http://woodworker.com/california-air-compressor-1hp-46-gal-alum-tank-mssu-165-470.asp?utm_source=promo&utm_medium=email&utm_content 5470&utm_campaign=IRW52H

I wouldn't buy anything with "California" as part of its name. Further, at $300 to over $400, the product screams "rip-off."
At the opposite end of the scale is this one from Harbor Freight:
<http://www.harborfreight.com/2-Horsepower-8-gal-125-PSI-Portable-Air-Compressor-69667.html?ccdenc=eyJjb2RlIjoiOTk0NDM0NDkiLCJza3UiOiI2OTY2NyIsImlzIjoiMTA5Ljk5IiwicHJvZHVjdF9p%0D%0AZCI6IjkxNjEifQ%3D%3D%0D%0A> At $109 (sale), you can get THREE of them for the price of one from California.
If you REALLY want economical, think on (only $60): <http://www.harborfreight.com/3-gallon-100-psi-oilless-pancake-air-compressor-95275.html>
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On 5/30/2013 8:39 AM, Mike Marlow wrote:

<http://www.harborfreight.com/2-Horsepower-8-gal-125-PSI- Portable-Air-Compressor-69667.html...> ...

Central Pneumatic 67501 Portable Air Compressor, 2 Horsepower, 8 Gallon, 125 PSI 2 Horsepower, 8 gal., 125 PSI Portable Air Compressor Item # 67501
Only: $139.99 Sale: $119.99
Central Pneumatic 68740 Portable Air Compressor, 2 Horsepower, 8 Gallon, 125 PSI 2 Horsepower, 8 gal., 125 PSI Portable Air Compressor Item # 68740
Only: $139.99 Sale: $119.99
Central Pneumatic 69667 Portable Air Compressor, 2 Horsepower, 8 Gallon, 125 PSI 2 Horsepower, 8 gal., 125 PSI Portable Air Compressor Item # 69667
Only: $139.99 Sale: $119.99
Can anybody come up w/ what's the difference in these above other than the product number?
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dpb wrote:

The product number changes at HF when they alter the product, either by changing the supplier or even something as simple as replacing a bushing with a ball bearing.
--
Steve W.

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HeyBub wrote:

<http://www.harborfreight.com/2-Horsepower-8-gal-125-PSI-Portable-Air-Compressor-69667.html?ccdenc=eyJjb2RlIjoiOTk0NDM0NDkiLCJza3UiOiI2OTY2NyIsImlzIjoiMTA5Ljk5IiwicHJvZHVjdF9p%0D%0AZCI6IjkxNjEifQ%3D%3D%0D%0A>

<http://www.harborfreight.com/3-gallon-100-psi-oilless-pancake-air-compressor-95275.html>

a 20 gal tank, and the motor looked like a washing machine motor. 110v plug. In big letters it said 5 hp.
--
 GW Ross 

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"G. Ross" wrote in message

The Craftsman stickers must have fallen off...
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On 5/30/2013 7:37 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

No....the Craftsman are currently 6.5HP "peak".
I have a shop vac that can used to jump start jet engines or blow shingles off the house.
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"Pat Barber" wrote in message

"Peak" is the instant before they burst into flames... or at least that is what I figured when my Dremel tool burst into flames, in my hands, while using down spiral bits to cut out drywall around electrical boxes. ;~)
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On 5/30/2013 12:22 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Well, you gotta love their ads....
I liked the one where the guy builds a covered bridge with a circular saw and a hammer in what appeared to be a weekend job.
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wrote:

..>

To me, "contractor grade" these days means when the help drops it off the roof, the contractor isn't out much. Certainly haven't seen many quality tools in the stores with that description plastered on their butts.
Stan
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On 5/29/2013 10:38 PM, tdacon wrote:

http://woodworker.com/california-air-compressor-1hp-46-gal-alum-tank-mssu-165-470.asp?utm_source=promo&utm_medium=email&utm_content 5470&utm_campaign=IRW52H

You might also take a look here, In the same price range and pretty well known brands.
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_air-compressors+single-stage-electric-air-compressors+2-9-cfm
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On 5/29/2013 8:38 PM, tdacon wrote:

http://woodworker.com/california-air-compressor-1hp-46-gal-alum-tank-mssu-165-470.asp?utm_source=promo&utm_medium=email&utm_content 5470&utm_campaign=IRW52H While I do like Woodworker Supply, a "much" better choice would be something along these lines:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Note this is a oil lubed cast iron unit. It is heavy as a mud fence (61 lbs) but it is quiet and should last you a very long time.
There are other besides Makita but look for similar features.
The oil lube and cast iron are the big deals for any compressor.
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"tdacon" wrote in message
Thanks for your comments, folks.
Tom
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On Wed, 29 May 2013 20:38:48 -0700, "tdacon"

Not bad, and if their claimed 3,000 Hours can actually be reached... Good luck with that. I'd want to know who they're buying their bare motor and compressor units from and research that claim.
If you plan to use it a lot (and getting 2,000+ hours between compressor rebuilds actually matters) this isn't the one. They claim 1680 RPM which is quite a bit of slip for an 1800 nominal RPM motor. And with a direct-drive compressor there isn't much flywheel, just the motor mass.
They claim an Aluminum tank is better because "it won't rust" - true, but it still corrodes. And if it gets started it can fail even faster than steel - especially if it develops a crack from the pressure cycling.
You want an oil-lubed compressor running on a belt reduction (they live much longer at ~800 RPM) with a nice big flywheel to smooth out the operation. Run that pump from a real Compressor Duty motor, feeding into a much larger receiver tank.
For small shops the classic 2-HP on a 30-gallon tank is the bare minimum, a horizontal will fit under the workbench. If you plan to use an impact a lot, sandblast or paint, 5-HP (3.5 if you do the math - they like to lie a lot) on a 60 or 80-gallon receiver tank.
A two-stage crams more air into the tank, so it goes longer between starts. And if you run an industrial shop where it's running most of the day, that's when you step up to a screw-type constant run compressor - which is a whole 'nother discussion.
If you get reputable units they'll be rated for expected run life from 10,000 to 25,000 hours. Hook up an hour meter and keep them honest - and it makes it far easier to follow the manufacturers advise to change the oil in the compressor every 100 to 250 hours.
And when it starts having a hard time getting up to 120 or 175 PSI (two-stage) it's time to search down a rebuild kit.
--<< Bruce >>--
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